1-20 of 188 Search Results for

semi

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
... 6i in Old French. For the stressed element, the e, the tongue is in a mid-front position and for the semi-vocalic element, the i, it is in the near-by high front position. Precision of utterance demands here too much effort and gradually the tongue moves backward for the k, along its own...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 91–94.
Published: 01 March 1961
... manuscript alternatives, both because of the differing drafts of individual poems and because of the many rough or semi-final drafts in which no choice has been indicated among the variants clustered around the margins and between the lines. Though there will inevitably be continuing scholarly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1944) 5 (2): 240.
Published: 01 June 1944
... to accept the complete letter- writer as a framework for social satire and semi-fictional writing designed to amuse rather than to instruct. Later both the letter- writer of the kind instituted by Breton and the adaptations of the ars dictaminis were overthrown by the French academies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2005) 66 (4): 443–476.
Published: 01 December 2005
... Hubback’s Younger Sister (1850) and Emily Eden’s Semi-Attached Couple (1860) mixed nostalgia and a patronizing contempt for the exploits of immoral aristocrats, yet rescued their protagonists by “domesticat- ing” them. Through a back-projection of Victorian middle-class values, they recuperated the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1942) 3 (1): 5–8.
Published: 01 March 1942
... palatal semivowel [y], like the liquids, the nasals, and the velar semi- vowel [a], is consonantal in the presence of a tautosyllabic sonant ; otherwise, it is sonantal. In a strong syllable it is always conso- nantal, since here a tautosyllabic sonant is always present: thus, in the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1945) 6 (1): 51–52.
Published: 01 March 1945
..., and those which he left in the later version were, in general-such as the ee rimes-of a type that was not so conspicuous to his ear. The 1805 couplets left unchanged in the 1850 version are semi- bility-me (11, 285--11, 270-71), me-greatly (IV, 342-43=IV, 335-36), realities-trees (VI...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1944) 5 (2): 240–241.
Published: 01 June 1944
... public to accept the complete letter- writer as a framework for social satire and semi-fictional writing designed to amuse rather than to instruct. Later both the letter- writer of the kind instituted by Breton and the adaptations of the ars dictaminis were overthrown by the French academies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 540–541.
Published: 01 December 1949
... decade ago as a doctoral dissertation at Yale in a semi-bibliographical survey of Werther plays and poems. The focus of the present work is shifted to “an evaluation of the effect of imitation and notoriety upon the interpretation” of Werther itself. In the past most of our knowledge of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1967) 28 (1): 110–111.
Published: 01 March 1967
... handling of realistic social problems irhich semi A. WALTON LITZ 111 hardly credible. In both cases some good critical observations have been distorted through Donovan’s insistence that a coherent “imaginative vision” informs each novel. This...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1941) 2 (3): 515–516.
Published: 01 September 1941
... semi-notables as Thomson, Shenstone, and Isaac Watts; by those who are interested in chart- ing the progress of sincere interest in an external nature not en- tirely methodized; and by those who would observe some of the early workings of the ferment that was to become Methodism. The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1972) 33 (2): 188–189.
Published: 01 June 1972
... high style in terms of thq idea of Gravity (chap. 7). The difficulty with these chapters is that the Ideas-lofty, semi-platonic extrapolations upon the older (and more current in the Kenaissance) catego- ries of high, low, and middle style-tend to be, when applied to specific pas...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 80–81.
Published: 01 March 1972
... court and her love rather “a clefeat-a failure to meet the challenge of life, a selfish withdrawal from the risks of self-giving, a semi- neurotic flight from reality” (p. x)? Helen Karen Kaps proposes to answer the question by bringing out “the moral viewpoint implicit in the total clesign of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1940) 1 (3): 420–421.
Published: 01 September 1940
...- revenge lent a semi-religious tone to the plays, and the atmosphere was correspondingly serious,” he seems to me to be overstating the case. There was a vital Elizabethan background of moral serious- ness, which he has studied to good purpose, but the acceptance of that background for...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 376–377.
Published: 01 September 1946
... the extreme opposite, the voiceless consonant. One also notes that j, described as a spirant (p. 15), is equated with the English y, which is a semi-vowel. From the point of view of historical development one occasionally, but rarely, meets a statement that one would wish expressed other...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 377–378.
Published: 01 September 1946
... for example r, with which one has long been familiar as indicating the vocalic us;of the liquid, is here employed for the extreme opposite, the voiceless consonant. One also notes that j, described as a spirant (p. 15), is equated with the English y, which is a semi-vowel. From the point...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1948) 9 (1): 104–105.
Published: 01 March 1948
... manuscript Harley 3859 (Cymmrodor, IX, 170, and XXI, 67). The line goes back to the semi-historical Cunedda, and nowhere contains any reference to Arthur. Geoffrey must have known this, for nothing that he says is inconsistent with it, and nowhere does he suggest that Arthur left any descendants. I...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 504–505.
Published: 01 December 1950
...- in The Mark of Anarchy and Swellfoot the Tyrant receive something of the appreciative exposition they deserve. On the other hand, one of the main areas of weakness is in the treatment of the autobiographicaland semi-autobiographical poems, for Baker determinedly shuts his eyes to the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1950) 11 (4): 505–506.
Published: 01 December 1950
... that on the political poems where- in The Mark of Anarchy and Swellfoot the Tyrant receive something of the appreciative exposition they deserve. On the other hand, one of the main areas of weakness is in the treatment of the autobiographicaland semi-autobiographical poems, for Baker...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1950) 11 (3): 374–375.
Published: 01 September 1950
... the preceding rhythm, thus lessening both the beauty and significance of these lines: “Hard wrestled he with the horrors / Of Ancient Death. / Heavy upon him lay / The weight of the Old Wor!d.” But most unfortunate is this translator’s clinging to the prettifying semi- Biblical tone...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1951) 12 (2): 231–232.
Published: 01 June 1951
... history plays, their sources, their political philosophy, and possible contemporary allusiveness. “The Elizabethan Playhouse” is a brief semi-popular presentation of the subject as it looked in 1918. Much less dated are the textual notes on Shakespeare at the end of the volume. These contain...