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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 183–191.
Published: 01 June 1944
...Ernst Rose Copyright © 1944 by Duke University Press 1944 TWO GERMAN TRANSLATIONS OF LOUXZE LABfi’S SECOND SONNET By ERNSTROSE After centuries of comparative oblivion, modern times have wit- nessed quite a reawakening of interest...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (1): 91–92.
Published: 01 March 1954
... Amours de 1552 et 1553 dtaient, selon son oreille tout autant que selon son coeur, en vCritd ‘proprement nez pour les amours”’ (p. 232). The second important revelation concerning Ronsard‘s revisions results from a well-documented study of numerous details having to do with the lyricism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 41–44.
Published: 01 March 1942
...William Riley Parker Copyright © 1942 by Duke University Press 1942 MILTON ON KING JAMES THE SECOND By WILLIAMRILEY PARKER In the first published life of Milton, Anthony h Wood included a bibliography of Milton’s printed works, the thirty-fourth...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 9–16.
Published: 01 March 1942
...Norman E. Eliason Copyright © 1942 by Duke University Press 1942 CHAUCER’S SECOND NUN ? By NORMANE. ELIASON Discussions about the Second Nun are usually confined to two questions : whether or not it was proper for her to be the chcrpeleyne...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 66–78.
Published: 01 March 1963
...Henry Kratz Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 1 A shortened version of this paper was read at the Pacific Northwest Conference of Foreign Language Teachers in Portland, Oregon, April 14, 1962. THE SECOND SOUND SHIFT IN OLD FRANCONIAN...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 217–218.
Published: 01 June 1961
...Victor E. Hanzeli James Doolittle. Genève: Librairie E. Droz; Paris: Librairie Minard, 1960. Pp. 136. Copyright © 1961 by Duke University Press 1961 Victor E. Hanseli 217 Rameau’s Nephew: A Study of Diderot‘s “Second Satire...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (2): 125–144.
Published: 01 June 1989
...MARVIN GLASSER Copyright © 1989 by Duke University Press 1989 THE POET AND THE ROYAL PERSONA LYRICAL STRUCTURES IN SHAKESPEARE’S SECOND TETRALOGY By MARVINGLASSER In addition to its historical and political...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (1): 81–89.
Published: 01 March 1952
...Panos Paul Morphos Copyright © 1952 by Duke University Press 1952 RENAISSANCE TRADITION IN ROUSSEAU’S SECOND DISCOURS By PANOSPAUL MORPHOS It has been suggested by students of Rousseau that, whereas he shows in his writings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (2): 215–237.
Published: 01 June 2014
...: Essays on Victorian Writers . London : Heinemann . ———. 1899 . Matthew Arnold . Edinburgh : Blackwood . ———. 1923 . A Second Scrap Book . London : Macmillan . ———. 1924 . A Last Scrap Book . London : Macmillan . ———. 1935 ( 1900-1904 ). A History of Criticism and Literary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (2): 123–155.
Published: 01 June 2012
...Jerome McGann This essay reconsiders Cooper’s work and its historical position in two salient relations: first, the Euro-American legal representations that organized the seizure and settlement of the American land from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth century; second, the canonical ways...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 97–116.
Published: 01 March 2009
...Odai Johnson One of the most violent and influential inaugural mappings of migrational theater in the Western world occurred in the second century BCE, a period of aggressive Roman expansion (into Greece, the Near East, North Africa, and Spain). In one traumatic century Rome circled...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 117–131.
Published: 01 March 2009
..., doubling can mean either standing in for another actor (as in the case of a stunt double) or taking more than one part in the same performance: the first conjoins (two actors on one mask); the second bifurcates (two masks on one actor). Both kinds of doubling figure in the production history...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 229–269.
Published: 01 September 2010
...David Quint Milton tightly structures book 3 of Paradise Lost around analogies and distinctions between divine and solar light, the invisible heaven beheld by the poet's blind faith in the book's first half and the visible universe and sun visited by Satan in its second, vision down and up...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 69–94.
Published: 01 March 2012
... transnational position, the first conceiving of the Protestant Ascendancy as neofeudal landlords who transform Irish labor into capitalist wealth, the second characterizing the Anglo-Irish as a cosmopolitan class of professional managers. By regarding these socioeconomic roles as affective dispositions between...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 289–308.
Published: 01 September 2012
... second claim involves periodization and uneven development. The events that produced the 1968 social explosions in the global North are bound up with the earlier liberation movements of the global South. Thus the global South’s 1968, partially reflected in these novels, offers a perspective...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 351–372.
Published: 01 September 2012
... of the novel’s conception of reality in the Mexican borderlands: first, the Ciudad Juárez femicides as objects of representation; second, the economic conditions underlying the systemic violence perpetrated against female maquiladora workers and the rift between labor and capital; and third, the relation of art...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (2): 151–170.
Published: 01 June 2013
... in original languages and in translation. In the second part Damrosch proposes that the fundamental tension today has shifted to the question of the place of literary studies in a multimedia age, and he explores how we can make affirmative use of the common translation of classic texts across not only...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (2): 171–195.
Published: 01 June 2013
...-translated, first, because they appear simultaneously in multiple languages and, second, because they engage formally, thematically, and typographically with the theory and practice of translation. Chang and Voge help us think about the relationship between modernism and world literature. They show...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (3): 331–362.
Published: 01 September 2013
...Robert D. Hume Some 250 English comedies are set in London between circa 1600 and 1737. Three clichés about them remain current. First, “Jacobean city comedy” performs serious sociopolitical work. Second, the social level of the protagonists rises in the “comedy of wit” or “comedy of manners...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (4): 465–492.
Published: 01 December 2013
... famously claims about freedom: that it is best understood not as sovereignty but as natality, being freed from life’s automatic routines and partaking, in a sense, of a second birth. Rather than conjure free movement—whether through self-control, capable pursuit of self-interest, or unimpeded intellectual...