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scotch

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (3): 309–311.
Published: 01 September 1943
... not to himself but to the Scotch people. Almost immediately after writing the sonnet Keats added, “I will endeavour to get rid of my prejudices and tell yoti fairly about the Scotch. . . This remark is patently intended to be a comment on the poem; the sonnet, he thinks, has shown his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 499–500.
Published: 01 December 1944
..., in the humanity of a profound thinker, an Inquirer after truth.” It is not, however, a biography, but rather a series of essays showing Hume as either patron or opponent of several Scotch, Eng- lish, and French contemporaries. Since Boswell fortunately, or per- haps unfortunately, chose to write a life...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 117–121.
Published: 01 March 1967
... of novels. Hart does not confine himself to the “Scotch novels,” and he makes a convincing case for seeing several at least of the novels generally dismissed as “tushery” not only as interesting and sometimes good novels, but as novels dealing with variations of the same themes that occupy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 247–248.
Published: 01 June 1946
... greatness.” Akenside was a deist and a republican. Dr. Kahrl believes that if Smollett were satirizing Aken- side for offending the Scotch, the novelist would have had a Scotch- man as well as Pallet and Jolter disgrace the Physician. Yet, as Howard S. Buck, in the article cited by Dr. Kahrl...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 616–618.
Published: 01 December 1965
... to me, an occasional straining to fit everything into the pattern. I would protest, too, though mildly, at the frequent references to “Scotch Calvinism,” undefined and undifferentiated, as a generalized term for all the religious ideas against which Stevenson rebelled. If that rebellion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 195–207.
Published: 01 September 1960
.... By January 25, 1818, the Scottish boom in English culture had reached new proportions, and balladry was only one of its voices. The reviewer in the Champion begins : When a Leith Smack arrives in the river freighted with a Scotch novel, when ten thousand copies of this novel are subscribed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 375–377.
Published: 01 September 1970
... prosecuted by the crown. Clearly, Marston had a grudge against the Scottish adventurers who accompanied James to G. K. HUNTEK 377 London. None the less I believe that he was capable of using the word Scotch without requiring James to wince...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 377–379.
Published: 01 September 1970
.... None the less I believe that he was capable of using the word Scotch without requiring James to wince. The “Scotch barnacle” was a well- known phenomenon (like the “Scotch boot Marston would have been in- capable of expressing what these objects were if he had not used the adjec- tive...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 1967
... not confine himself to the “Scotch novels,” and he makes a convincing case for seeing several at least of the novels generally dismissed as “tushery” not only as interesting and sometimes good novels, but as novels dealing with variations of the same themes that occupy the center of Scott’s attention...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 501–503.
Published: 01 December 1948
... and moderns. Chap- ter three is devoted to Thomas Blackwell’s Enquiry into the Life and Writings of Homer (1735), chapters four and five to “Scotch Criti- cism after 1750” and to “English Historical Interpretations,” and chapter six to Robert Wood’s Essay upon the Original Genius and Writings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 142–143.
Published: 01 March 1942
... becomes epic. The good and bad sides of Scott’s style, his pompous eighteenth- century mannerisms on the one hand and his lively, simple, straight- forward realism on the other, become equally “epic” in their de- rivation. Any of the realistic Scotch characters, their vivid talk bris- tling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 194–210.
Published: 01 June 1947
...” (Prothero, I, 236). 17. MS 6514 [Fragment of English Bards and Scotch Re~ewers] 2 pp. 4to. Untitled, unsigned, and undated. No watermark. On p. 2, written in different ink and by different hand from that of the verses, is the remark, “Lord Byron’s first copy-English...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 429–439.
Published: 01 December 1948
... and Scotch Reviewers, employed the same kind of scathing and denunciatory satire as Odes and Epistles. There is no similarity of subject matter between the two satires, but Byron must have been * Prothero, op. cit., V, 169. Hoover H. Jordait 43 1 impressed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 500–501.
Published: 01 December 1944
... that the wares he is bargaining for are a’ ae ’00,’ for the names of the two collabora- tors have long been known to be in the foremost rank of editors and interpreters of whatever pertains to Burns. But if he is at all touched with the caution of Scotch thrift, he may finger his bawbees rather...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 191–204.
Published: 01 June 1943
... or norm. The two regional dia- lects he singles out for condemnation are the Scotch and the Irish. Thus he points out, not without a touch of malice, what he regards as Scotticisms in the style of Bishop Burnet’s History of His Own Times: the use of the words piousest for most pious, liker...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 501–503.
Published: 01 December 1944
... buyer of this work can rest assured that the wares he is bargaining for are a’ ae ’00,’ for the names of the two collabora- tors have long been known to be in the foremost rank of editors and interpreters of whatever pertains to Burns. But if he is at all touched with the caution of Scotch...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 415–441.
Published: 01 December 2009
... more than a century old. In England, since at least the 1650s, Dave Harker notes, “songs deal- ing with ‘rustic or humble life’ had invariably been termed ‘Northern’ or ‘Scotch’ by Genteel people.”22 In London publications, “Northern” and “Scotch” songs, often entirely fabricated in the south...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (1): 37–40.
Published: 01 March 1952
... of Chaucer’s time,” and adds, “I hope you will like this for all its Carelessness” (Letter 147, p. 456). In apologizing for Chaucer’s verse (“The verse of Chaucer, I confess, is not harmonious Dryden says, “there is the rude sweetness of a Scotch tune in it.” Poetical Works, p. 744. 40...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 433–436.
Published: 01 December 1986
... experiments in traditional satiric modes and of English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, Beaty provides an economical yet enlightening overview of the literary climate in which Byron’s early satiric impulses were fostered. He reminds us, for instance, that Byron had recourse to a “living tradition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 443–446.
Published: 01 December 1986
... experiments in traditional satiric modes and of English Bards and Scotch Reviewers, Beaty provides an economical yet enlightening overview of the literary climate in which Byron’s early satiric impulses were fostered. He reminds us, for instance, that Byron had recourse to a “living tradition...