1-20 of 90 Search Results for

satyre

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 123–131.
Published: 01 June 1977
...Richard Douglas Jordan Copyright © 1977 by Duke University Press 1977 UNA AMONG THE SATYRS THE FAERIE QUEENE, 1.6 By RICHARDDOUGLAS JORDAN In his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 425–429.
Published: 01 December 1947
.... In The M’ilZ, the phrasing of the bequest “To Je~uitesinasmuch as it names the farilts commonly alleged against the followers of Loyola, has an acrid flavor not found in the juxtaposed clauses. But it is in Satyre IV, which Professor Grierson dates between March and September, 1597,6that Donne...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (1): 19–37.
Published: 01 March 1988
... Poetic: Rochester’s Satyr against Mankind and Artemisia to Chloe, with Notes on Swift’s Tale of a Tub and Gulliver’s Travels,” LanFS, 5 (1972): 123-45. For other readings see David Sheehan, “The Ironist in Rochester’s ‘A Letter from Artemisia in the Town to Chloe in the Country TSL, 25 (1980...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (1): 102–109.
Published: 01 March 1964
... by the lion . . . befriended by the satyrs, and helped by Sir Satyrane . . . seem thematically all to consist of the same material: truth is part of the natural law, and therefore creatures purely under the natural law-wild beasts and half-human beings-though far from the means...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (4): 523–535.
Published: 01 December 1965
... of Poetry.. .Made English, Canto I, line 17, in Poems of John Dryden, ed. James Kinsley, 4 vols. (Oxford, 1958); “An Allusion to Horace: The 10th Satyr of the 1st Book,” line 56, in Poems of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, ed. Vivian de Sola Pinto (London, 1905); quotations from Waller are from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (3): 299–311.
Published: 01 September 1945
... besides a psy- chological basis for the portrayal of types derived from the morali- ties and from Plautine and Renaissance comedy. In the three suc- ceeding plays-the “Comicall Satyres”: Every Man out of his Humor ( 1599), Cynthia’s Rezds ( 1600), and Poetaster ( 1601)- Jonson...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (4): 325–330.
Published: 01 December 1958
.... 325 326 An Unrecognized Poem by John Marston? Of the poets who were writing in 1599 the one who most prided himself on his “rough-hewne lines” was John Marston. Satire I11 of the Certaine Satyres which he published along with The Metumor- phosis of Pigmalions Image in 1598...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (1): 37–40.
Published: 01 March 1952
... of the earlier world of nymphs and satyrs being displaced by these “faery broods.” In both poets the older powers now displaced are the more valued ones, and the less familiar. Upon a time, before the faery broods Drove Nymph and Satyr from the prosperous woods...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (2): 133–150.
Published: 01 June 1976
... of Dryden’s poem, is rather an instance of the perils that all writers must face. The “dang’rous Rocks of Poetry” was in Dryden’s day a common theme. Oldham himself wrote a “Satyr,” in which “The Person of Spencer [Edmund Spenser] is brought in, Dissuading the author from the Study...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (1): 126–128.
Published: 01 March 1952
...). The Whipper Pamphlets (1601). Part I: The Whip- ping of the Satyre (John Weever) ; Part I1 : No Whippinge (N. Breton), The Whipper of the Satyre his Pennaace (E. Guilpin). Liverpool: university Press of Liverpool Reprints, Nos. 5 and 6, 1951. I, xi + 66; 11, viii + 63. Davis, Herbert (editor...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (4): 402–417.
Published: 01 December 1966
... piece as an “Ironical Satyr” as late as 1710. By satire he merely meant a didactic work containing a strong argument or attack; by irony, simply the idea that what he was saying was the opposite of what he meant. To this he added the more general idea of “dissimulation” and wrote through...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 198–201.
Published: 01 June 1972
... in the presentation of character while remaining firmly anchored in the reality of everyday experience” (p. 3 1). Would-be interpreters of the genesis, structure, and vtritable signiJcation of Le Neveu de Rameau have been invited and frustrated by “Satyre 2de” since Goethe’s delighted discovery...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 424–428.
Published: 01 December 1948
... wind that nods the mountain pine,) 0 forester divine! [ 1111 Thou, . . . (By all the echoes that about thee ring,) Hear us, 0 satyr king! [ IV] 0 Hearkener to the loud clapping shears . . . : Winder of the horn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (4): 440–449.
Published: 01 December 1970
... Domestick Bliss be tliin,e! Be no unpleasing Melancholy mine: lo As Alvin Kernan points out, the Elizabethan “satyr” often takes the shape of ;I betrayed idcalist suffcring from an escess of the humor of hlelancholy (The Cankered 1141cse: Sntire ff the English Renaissaiice [New Haven...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (3): 204–212.
Published: 01 September 1956
.... 204 Francis E. Lit& 205 Reason has joined together, let no Man put asunder”; and “Thus their Talk is a constant Satyr upon others, and their Actions a living Satyr upon themselves.” Eighteenth-century opinion of the style of his sermons...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (3): 417–418.
Published: 01 September 1940
... of the ballets themselves, the reappearance of the same Fauns, Satyrs, Zephyrs, Shepherds, Bohemians, and so forth. There emerges in the first part of the book a full-length por- trait of the poet himself, a well-built man of reddish hair, con- nected with the Court at an earlier date than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 179–194.
Published: 01 June 1970
...- geous to folly and knavery (p. 276)-the comic poet and satirist (Butler makes little distinction between the two) are transported by a rapture of hatred for “what is.” And therefore Satyrs that are only provok’d with the Madnes and Folly of the world, are found to conteine inore...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (3): 309–310.
Published: 01 September 1952
... and corruption of the universe.” He has only “a conventional phrase or two” in Satire V and Elegy XVII. He even misses his chance in Satire 111: “The concept of decay is still not central to the poem even in Satyre 111.” Things begin to look better in 77ze Progresse of the Soule. And finally...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (3): 310–311.
Published: 01 September 1952
... not develop the obvious opportunity of describing in detail the decline and corruption of the universe.” He has only “a conventional phrase or two” in Satire V and Elegy XVII. He even misses his chance in Satire 111: “The concept of decay is still not central to the poem even in Satyre 111...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 406–416.
Published: 01 December 1973
...). As I am conjectured to have generally dealt in Kaillery and Satyr, both in Prose and Verse, if that Conjecture be right, although such an Opinion hath been an absolute Bar to my Kising in the World, yet that very World must suppose that I followed what I thought to be my Talent...