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roxana

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2016) 77 (4): 595–597.
Published: 01 December 2016
... reader is fully prepared for the moment, but she can still be surprised by it, over and over again” (177). At its best Miller’s book succeeds in isolating surprise as a crucial aesthetic phenomenon, deployed in both fiction and poetry. In recently rereading Roxana , for example, I was taken—surprised...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2003) 64 (3): 323–347.
Published: 01 September 2003
..., Defoe’s Roxana, Fielding’s Tom Jones, Burney’s Eve- lina, Lennox’s Female Quixote—we could extend the list at will.) Perhaps the following will stand as a working hypothesis: If action becomes unstuck in the early novel, if action no longer seems to carry Žxed prov- idential meanings, it is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1996) 57 (3): 510–512.
Published: 01 September 1996
... ghostly. Three essays deal with individual works (Roxana, The Female Husband, Clam’ssa);two in effect summarize the argu- ment of Castle’s book Masquerade and Civilization; one, the title piece, con- siders the metaphor of the thermometer as a measure of female feeling and the perplexed relation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 194–196.
Published: 01 June 1977
... satire. Defoe may treat him with irony on occasion, but in the beginning, with Crusoe, he feels considerable sympathy and some identification with his creation. Ac- cording to this scheme, by the time he reached his last novel, Roxana, Defoe had ceased to sympathize with the rationalizations...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1966) 27 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 June 1966
... University Press, 1965. xiii + 203 pp. $6.50. G. A. Starr seeks to show Defoe’s debt, in Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, and Roxana, to the tradition of spiritual autobiography in the seventeenth century. In reviewing the tradition, he concentrates on Presbyterian and Anglican sources rather than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1980) 41 (3): 287–291.
Published: 01 September 1980
... “anachronisms” are not examples of hasty and careless planning, but are the result of Defoe’s deliberate placing of his characters in two times at once, thus enabling them to be immediate and sympathetic, and yet remote and mythic. “Defoe manages to have it both ways” (p. 35). Thus Roxana, Singleton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1983) 44 (4): 410–418.
Published: 01 December 1983
... voluminous output has concerned itself with the artistry of those fictions. This delightfully illustrated little book collects five of Novak’s essays published over a fifteen-year period, ranging from a trail-blazing 1966 study of the aesthetic and moral complexity of Roxana, to a 1981 survey of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 196–200.
Published: 01 June 1977
... plea is doubtful in Roxana is that she has already relieved her immediate hunger and rid herself of her family when she plunges into what she herself knows is a course of sin. She replaces pleading her poverty with a plea of a fear of poverty, then with an argument from overwhelming passion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1978) 39 (2): 191–193.
Published: 01 June 1978
... references to each); instead he writes of Dyer’s Ruins of Rome and The Fleece, Roxana, the Graveyard School, The Deserted Village, and, most extensively, Wordsworth. Even if the book does not match our expectations, however, it works. At least so it seems to me. Goldstein, one learns, is a poet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1978) 39 (2): 193–195.
Published: 01 June 1978
... Fleece, Roxana, the Graveyard School, The Deserted Village, and, most extensively, Wordsworth. Even if the book does not match our expectations, however, it works. At least so it seems to me. Goldstein, one learns, is a poet; and this book may have had its beginning with a reading of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1966) 27 (2): 222–224.
Published: 01 June 1966
..., 1965. xiii + 203 pp. $6.50. G. A. Starr seeks to show Defoe’s debt, in Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, and Roxana, to the tradition of spiritual autobiography in the seventeenth century. In reviewing the tradition, he concentrates on Presbyterian and Anglican sources rather than Baptist and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1966) 27 (2): 226–228.
Published: 01 June 1966
... even a distant model for Roxana, whose heroine (Starr observes) is perhaps beyond salvation? On the evidence of this study, the case is not completely proven. Starr successfully demonstrates how widespread was the confessional form in the seventeenth century. He also blurs theological...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 373–375.
Published: 01 December 1960
...” that he filled the allotted space even when his manuscript was sent from the northernmost part of Scotland. He is not known to have been required to cut any of his tracts, but several were expanded for republication ; his Roxana has been considered so incomplete that a poor continuation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1972) 33 (4): 456–459.
Published: 01 December 1972
... “no learning whatsoever can give a man the knowledge of another’s heart.” The last statement sounds very much like Defoe’s attitude toward conscience, and the way he treats casuists in Roxana suggests further sym- pathy with South’s position. But what of the Protestant casuistry of Jeremy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2008) 69 (2): 221–243.
Published: 01 June 2008
... Roxana (1724) that “it is not always necessary that the names of persons should be discovered,” and the preface of Moll Flanders (1722) blandly asserted the unimportance of anonymity: “The author is here supposed to be writing her own history, and in the 53  Jeffrey Rothschild, “Renaissance...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1987) 48 (3): 294–300.
Published: 01 September 1987
... pp. $10.95, paper. Dijkstra, Bram. Dejii and Economics: 7he Fortunes of “Roxana” in the History of Intqfwetation. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1987. xvi + 247 pp. $29.95. Evans, Mary. Jane Austen and the State. London and New York: Tavistock Publica- tions, 1987. xi + 97 pp. $6.95...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1958) 19 (4): 343–351.
Published: 01 December 1958
... the diver- gence. See Spiro Peterson, “The Matrimonial Theme of Defoe’s Roxana,” PMLA, LXX (1959, 186-87. 350 Lapponia, Laplund, and Laputa would “praise the Beauty of a Woman,” they might draw upon “Words of Art . . . from Musick.” Is this the way to praise a woman...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2013) 74 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2013
... Plague Year  reveals risk taking within its plot of risk aversion, while in Roxana  Defoe’s attempt to move from will  to should creates what has been widely recognized as an unsettling conclusion. Here Molesworth applies one of many stimulating...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2013) 74 (1): 118–121.
Published: 01 March 2013
... to speculate on likely outcomes, Molesworth argues, served to conceal the plot’s “transgressive” orientation toward exception- ality. Thus A Journal of the Plague Year  reveals risk taking within its plot of risk aversion, while in Roxana  Defoe’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2013) 74 (1): 121–125.
Published: 01 March 2013
... taking within its plot of risk aversion, while in Roxana  Defoe’s attempt to move from will  to should creates what has been widely recognized as an unsettling conclusion. Here Molesworth applies one of many stimulating comparisons, aligning Roxana’s...