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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 532–533.
Published: 01 December 1949
... Fair Rosamond: A Study of the Development of a Literary Theme. By VIRGIL B. HELTZEL. Evanston, Illinois : Northwestern University Studies in the Humanities, No. 16, 1947. Pp. viii 4- 135. $3.00. Of England‘s royal mistresses, few have attained such literary fame, quanti- tatively...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 December 1949
...- perhaps we could say even baroque. We could well hope that the book will not suffer at the hands of some English translator the fate of the earlier Der Sinn des Hamlet. E. AYERSTAYLOR University of Wmhington Fair Rosamond: A Study...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 107–109.
Published: 01 March 2011
...). In a fascinating reading of the novel that gets at some of the schadenfreude John Portmann invoked in When Bad Things Happen to Other People (1999), Puckett argues that “thanks to Rosamond, the plot of the novel can . . . proceed in a way it had threatened not to” (104). By giving her the task of spilling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 110–113.
Published: 01 March 2011
... at some of the schadenfreude John Portmann invoked in When Bad Things Happen to Other People (1999), Puckett argues that “thanks to Rosamond, the plot of the novel can . . . proceed in a way it had threatened not to” (104). By giving her the task of spilling the beans about Casaubon’s will, Eliot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 114–116.
Published: 01 March 2011
... at some of the schadenfreude John Portmann invoked in When Bad Things Happen to Other People (1999), Puckett argues that “thanks to Rosamond, the plot of the novel can . . . proceed in a way it had threatened not to” (104). By giving her the task of spilling the beans about Casaubon’s will, Eliot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 116–120.
Published: 01 March 2011
...). In a fascinating reading of the novel that gets at some of the schadenfreude John Portmann invoked in When Bad Things Happen to Other People (1999), Puckett argues that “thanks to Rosamond, the plot of the novel can . . . proceed in a way it had threatened not to” (104). By giving her the task of spilling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 120–124.
Published: 01 March 2011
... invoked in When Bad Things Happen to Other People (1999), Puckett argues that “thanks to Rosamond, the plot of the novel can . . . proceed in a way it had threatened not to” (104). By giving her the task of spilling the beans about Casaubon’s will, Eliot can disparage Rosamond’s “aesthetic error...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 124–127.
Published: 01 March 2011
... at some of the schadenfreude John Portmann invoked in When Bad Things Happen to Other People (1999), Puckett argues that “thanks to Rosamond, the plot of the novel can . . . proceed in a way it had threatened not to” (104). By giving her the task of spilling the beans about Casaubon’s will, Eliot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (3): 231–250.
Published: 01 September 1983
... in the rec- ognition that each artifact reflects an individual and active mind. The opening poem, Rosamond’s letter to Henry I1 (pp. 133-39), firmly establishes the analogy between self and artifact. For Rosa- mond, the ink-stained paper epitomizes her blighted innocence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (1): 37–50.
Published: 01 March 1948
... with the outward structure of George Eliot’s novels-has no connection what- soever with what happens. “Miss Brooke,” the first book, does not end when Dorothea’s history reaches a definite point (the wedding trip), but includes the beginning of the Rosamond and Lydgate episode. The titles...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 513–514.
Published: 01 December 1947
..., 1947. Pp. xxxviii + 413. $3.50. Heltzcl, Virgil B. Fair Rosamond: A Study of the Development of a Literary Theme. Evanston : Northwestern University Studies in the Humanities, No. 16, 1937. Pp. viii f 135. $3.00. Heltzel, Virgil 13 (editor). Of Honour, by Robert Ashley. San Marino, Cali...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1989) 50 (1): 58–63.
Published: 01 March 1989
... is at least as interested in Dorothea’s relationship with Lydgate and Rosamond as she is in Dorothea’s relationship with Will. You can hear the creaking when Kucich tries to twist that into his theoretical structure. No matter. He has devised a powerful new instrument in the understanding of Victorian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (1): 86–91.
Published: 01 March 1966
... imagery (particularly as it characterizes Rosamond in Middlemarch) to a “biological in- sight” of T. H. Huxley (pp. 297-98). In fact, this insight (essentially that human beings in a sense recapitulate the evolutionary process in their individual development) was a nineteenthcentury common...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (4): 370–389.
Published: 01 December 1976
... to, defines passion as a source of pain and prevents a full vision of the inevitable and beneficial interaction of Love, Fate, and natural creation which Swinburne in his mature years intuited as fundamental to all life. The joy of passion is always mitigated (as it is in Swinburne’s Rosamond...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 216–223.
Published: 01 June 1948
... dinner party at the hotel and in the midst of it I asked her quietly if I could offer a ‘silent toast.’ She said, ‘I wish you would,’ knowing well what it would be-so we drank in silence to ‘A bright and beautiful memory.’ ” (Rosamond Gilder, ed., Letters of Richard Watson Gilder [Boston...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 175–186.
Published: 01 June 1945
... of the noise that stil increased: [G~v] for ye the Heroycke Lady, had so wounded him on the legg, that almost shee had cut it cleane asunder. Admiration would the sight of this battaile breede: for the nimblenesse and dexteritie that awayted on Rosamond cannot be imagined, which had so tyred...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (1): 150–183.
Published: 01 March 1965
... RENAISSANCE ENGLISH LITERATURE Only through an awareness of the element of convention in a poem are we able to respond fully and precisely to its significance. As a literary historian, C. S. Lewis writes of Daniel’s Complaint of Rosamond: It is shocking to find that the same year (1592) which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 308–329.
Published: 01 September 1970
... sonnets attempt to strike a posture somewhere between ornamental stylistic celebration and moral concern-precisely the strains to be found in Rosamond and a balancing point quite appropri- ate to a poet from the Pembroke circle. Whatever opinion one may have of Daniel’s relationship to his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 583–604.
Published: 01 December 2004
..., offer the crux of Eliot’s grander, more labyrinthine novel in a nutshell? Of Dorothea’s idealism? Of Lydgate’s professional ambition as much as of Rosamond’s vain fancies? Why not? In the explicit sector of Fred’s story, by way of the reversals and rectifications of Eliot’s deviously providential...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (1): 85–112.
Published: 01 March 1999
... 91 spirit communications from a recently deceased judge were still read and cited by spiritualists decades later, also published novels, plays, children’s stories, and a book of poems. Rosamond Dale Oliphant, an American spiritualistwho for a time devoted eight hours of each day...