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rosalind

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (2): 113–135.
Published: 01 June 1991
... gracious way of life. Taking issue with Halio, Rawdon Wilson has argued that the dialectic of As You Like It concerns not time consciousness and timelessness but the objective process of either public or natural time and the subjec- tive, private time sense of characters such as Rosalind...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 179–184.
Published: 01 June 1941
... from his family or from the reigning Duke. He overthrows the court wrestler with only the unsubstantial reward of Rosa- lind’s love; he escapes with Adam’s help from his brother’s plots, comes upon Rosalind in the Forest of Arden, and after some pretty fooling marries her with her ducal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (3): 231–247.
Published: 01 September 1980
... in As You Like It, where the layering of the disguise reaches dizzying proportions as Rosalind disguises herself as Ganyniede, and Ganymede in turn pretends to be Orlando’s Rosalind. The layered dis- guise means that Rosalind can have, simultaneously, a male admirer in Orlando and a female one...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 61–63.
Published: 01 March 1946
...Helge Kökeritz Copyright © 1946 by Duke University Press 1946 TOUCHSTONE IN ARDEN AS YOU LIKE IT, 11, iv, 16 By HELGEKOKERITZ When the runaway trio Rosalind, Celia, and Touchstone eventually arrive in the Forest of Arden...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 188–190.
Published: 01 June 1987
...David McPherson Miles Rosalind. London and New York: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1986. xiv + 306 pp. $55.00. Copyright © 1987 by Duke University Press 1987 188 REVIEWS find it similarly odd that a discussion of pervasive social...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 207–209.
Published: 01 June 1963
..., and Spenser’s friendships with important members of the Young and Leicester circles.” The “real meaning of the Calender,” he argues, is “an attack on [Elizabeth’s] French marriage.” According to the political allegory, the “story of Colin Clout, Rosalind, and Menalcas” mirrors “England’s sorrow...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 209–211.
Published: 01 June 1963
... of Colin Clout, Rosalind, and Menalcas” mirrors “England’s sorrow at, and opposition to, the contemplated marriage of the Queen with Alenqon.” Menalcas is “a daringly close anagram for Alenqon,” and Rosalind symbolizes Queen Elizabeth (“if we take R first, spell Elisa backwards, and change...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1995) 56 (4): 513–516.
Published: 01 December 1995
... for contrasting different types of heroines. This section also includes a discussion of Lyly’s (;allathuti and Fletcher’s 1,ovu’r I’ilp’mngu. In contrast, the analysis of A.5 You I,ikp It focuses rather appropriately on the significance of a second cross-gender disguise. Thus, the character of Rosalind...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (4): 467–475.
Published: 01 December 1968
... ‘your lordship’ moves right across the page until it becomes the subject of the final sentence. @p. 126-27) A second example is Vickers’ comment on Rosalind’s denial that peo- ple die of love. He points out that whereas all of Rosalind’s longer speeches in the part...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 111–114.
Published: 01 March 2007
... period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona in As You Like It and Othello shed light on the baffling medical assumptions of the period while offer- ing keen insights into the actions of characters that have posed interpre- tive problems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 115–118.
Published: 01 March 2007
... propounded in the early modern period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona in As You Like It and Othello shed light on the baffling medical assumptions of the period while offer- ing keen insights into the actions of characters that have posed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 119–122.
Published: 01 March 2007
.... The “body without organs” proffers a nonhierarchical, nonor- ganistic body that splinters out into the world around it: a body that Pas- ter sees propounded in the early modern period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona in As You Like It and Othello...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 123–126.
Published: 01 March 2007
... around it: a body that Pas- ter sees propounded in the early modern period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona in As You Like It and Othello shed light on the baffling medical assumptions of the period while offer- ing keen insights...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 126–128.
Published: 01 March 2007
... body that splinters out into the world around it: a body that Pas- ter sees propounded in the early modern period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona in As You Like It and Othello shed light on the baffling medical assumptions of the period...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 129–131.
Published: 01 March 2007
...-body dichotomy. The “body without organs” proffers a nonhierarchical, nonor- ganistic body that splinters out into the world around it: a body that Pas- ter sees propounded in the early modern period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (1): 132–135.
Published: 01 March 2007
... body that splinters out into the world around it: a body that Pas- ter sees propounded in the early modern period in similar terms through humoral theory. Paster’s analyses of Rosalind and Desdemona in As You Like It and Othello shed light on the baffling medical assumptions of the period...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 186–188.
Published: 01 June 1987
... documen- tation (as Marchette Chute’s readable Ben Jomon of Weslmimter [I9531 does not), synthesize knowledge gained since the early fifties, and add to our knowledge by original research. Rosalind Miles starts promisingly by an- nouncing that her book “is intended to supply the need for a modern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 219–236.
Published: 01 September 1979
... exclusion there to be part of a deliberate pattern, for the framing dialogue opposes the lay’s elaborate emphasis on gathering and harmony with a series of estrange- ments between Colin, Hobbinol, and Rosalind. Colin, says Hobbinol, has changed his “frend” for a “frenne”-a stranger (28).The result...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (1): 30–32.
Published: 01 March 1960
... that the Nymph “dies together with the fawn” (p. 238), while she obviously still lives at the end of the poem. And this is no mere slip, since he repeats the assertion later in the article. I almost feel provoked to quote Rosalind’s answer to Orlando: “men have died from time to time and worms have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 654–657.
Published: 01 December 1996
... for this collection, Huyssen makes a case for the modern museum as an “escape from amnesia” (311). He dismisses the modernist and left intellectual critique of the museum by writers such as Douglas Crimp, Rosalind Krauss, and Fredric Jameson. He shows how museums can revivify contemporary culture by drawing...