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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 97–116.
Published: 01 March 2009
...Odai Johnson One of the most violent and influential inaugural mappings of migrational theater in the Western world occurred in the second century BCE, a period of aggressive Roman expansion (into Greece, the Near East, North Africa, and Spain). In one traumatic century Rome circled the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (2): 215–235.
Published: 01 June 1993
...Anne Mack; J. J. Rome; Georg Mannejc Copyright © 1993 by Duke University Press 1993 Literary History, Romanticism, and Felicia Mernans Anne Mack, J. J. Rome, and Georg Mannejc AM. How agreeably “historical” we’ve all become in thinking about literature. But have we...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (2): 107–127.
Published: 01 June 2010
... commission to write the Franciade , but also Joachim Du Bellay were exploring epic as a change from love poetry. Having formally renounced Petrarchist lyric, Du Bellay drew on his experience in the French diplomatic service in Rome to compose his most famous sonnet collection, the Regrets . Although a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (1): 25–52.
Published: 01 March 2018
... particular the religious civil wars of the preceding century. Albeit in the discreetly displaced form of a martyr story set in imperial Rome, the play enacts the violent disorders associated with religion itself and so, by extension, the virtues of the new secular order that theater embodies. All of this...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (3): 319–347.
Published: 01 September 2020
... Theseus primarily through vernacular authors. Vernacular literature’s depictions of the mythic founders of Rome and Athens foreground classical heroes’ treachery and duplicity and minimize their roles as progenitors of empire and culture. Shakespeare’s quotation strategies in A Midsummer Night’s Dream...
Image
Published: 01 June 2019
Figure 1. Caravaggio, The Inspiration of Saint Matthew ( San Matteo e angelo ), 1602. Église Saint-Louis-des-Français. Courtesy of the Pieux Établissements de la France à Rome et à Lorette. Figure 1. Caravaggio, The Inspiration of Saint Matthew (San Matteo e angelo), 1602. Église Saint-Louis More
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 347–365.
Published: 01 September 2008
... that change, the play suggests a new conception of the relations between metropole and province. Corneille, drawing on Plutarch, tells the story of Rome out of joint with itself. The city’s power has been split between two factions, one led by the tyrannical Sylla, based in Rome, and the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 601–607.
Published: 01 December 1941
...Robert Warnock Copyright © 1941 by Duke University Press 1941 BOSWELL AND ANDREW LUMISDEN By ROBERTWARNOCK From Rome in May, 1765, Boswell wrote mysteriously to Sir Alexander Dick in Scotland: “I have the pleasure of being ac- quainted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 203–227.
Published: 01 September 1982
.... Taught by Richard Mulcaster, a contributor to London’s street pageants who once wrote that he loved Rome, but London more,15 he received a gown and a shilling to represent his school at the fu- neral of Robert Nowell, a wealthy London citizen whose family later contributed to Spenser’s support...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 115–134.
Published: 01 June 1979
... that Julius Caesar appears near the beginning of his maturity as a tragic dramatist, and Antony and Cleopatra and Cori- olanus near the end of his career, suggests that ancient Rome contin- ued to attract Shakespeare’s interest, providing a point of departure and final return. Frequent...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (1): 106–107.
Published: 01 March 1959
..., one of the most varied in the world, the speech of the city of Rome stands out not so much by reason of phonological or grammatical divergence from the standard language as because of the racy, spicy, picturesque character of its vocabulary, word combinations, and special expressions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 173–174.
Published: 01 June 1956
... scarcely published his second edition in 1856 before he began making preparations for a third, amplified, edition of his poems. Some time late in 1858 or 1859 (Bowers thinks the latter) Whitman turned over a batch of holographs to his friends, the Rome Brothers in Brooklyn, to set in type...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 174–175.
Published: 01 June 1956
... published his second edition in 1856 before he began making preparations for a third, amplified, edition of his poems. Some time late in 1858 or 1859 (Bowers thinks the latter) Whitman turned over a batch of holographs to his friends, the Rome Brothers in Brooklyn, to set in type. Whether...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 260–263.
Published: 01 June 1970
.... We see, too, how expertly Browning manages the monologues of Half Rome, the Other Half Rome, and Tertium Quid so that their combined, more or less covert effect is to sway the reader’s sympathies toward Pompilia and away from Guido. Sullivan’s treatment of Caponsacchi and Pompilia is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (3): 345–362.
Published: 01 September 2007
... tradefull Merchants that with weary toyle” or “This holy season fit to fast and pray” Amoretti( , 15, 22). Sans du Bellay, no “Ruines of Rome,” no “Visions of Bellay,” and probably no “Ruines of Time.” Apart from Chaucer, it is hard to think of an English poet who had as much influence on Spenser as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 645–648.
Published: 01 December 1996
...- mination, an ideologue’s dream.1 But the Aeneid, as Michael Putnam, W. Ralph Johnson, and Gordon Williams, among others, have argued, does not exorcise Rome’s enemies. Rather, it gives them an everlasting and unset- tling place in the world. Dido stands permanently apart from Aeneas...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 648–651.
Published: 01 December 1996
... that he will never get. This Vir- gil, like David Quint’s in his Epic and Empire, is a pillar of moralistic deter- mination, an ideologue’s dream.1 But the Aeneid, as Michael Putnam, W. Ralph Johnson, and Gordon Williams, among others, have argued, does not exorcise Rome’s enemies. Rather, it...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (1): 1–27.
Published: 01 March 2013
... a renewed ancient) French poetry that would raise France to the literary greatness of classical Greece and Rome. Although the Deffence  ostensibly aimed at a classical revival, contemporary Italy was the main source of material to be appropriated and imported. The Olive  and the Deffence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 331–334.
Published: 01 December 1953
... Rome had gone to the Campagna to escape the pestilence, tells how a noble barbarian from the banks of the Danube journeyed to Rome in the first year of his consulship to complain of the oppression and cruelty with which Germany was being ruled by Roman officials and to seek justice.2 A...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (3): 285–298.
Published: 01 September 1945
... occurs in connection with the choice of his successor, Pius I11 (Francesco Piccolomini), to celebrate whose elevation to the papacy in September, 1503, ambassadors were sent to Rome by Henry VII.15 Before their arrival, however, Pius, “not beguiling the hopes which the cardinals conceiued of...