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roderick

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (4): 415–417.
Published: 01 December 1948
... Espi- nele and Q~evedo,~and the disputed LuzariZZo de Tormes; and closer still the Frenchmen d’Aubig Sore1,O l’Hermite,1° Scarron,ll and Fureti6re ;12 and at the head-source, weakly but distinctly, the Roman 1 See the Preface to Roderick Random and the dedicatory letter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (1): 68–71.
Published: 01 March 1949
... was phenomenal, and a second edition was called for in the same year.’O Smollett’s well-known citation of the GiZ BZas as the inodel for his Roderick Random1S established an affinity between the young suc- cessful author and the GiZ BZm, the emulation of which had brought him sadly needed recognition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (3): 353–356.
Published: 01 September 1966
... 355 (p. 71), this cannot be done simply by noting the distinctive character of Roderick Random. The legitimacy of Smollett’s novel as the picaro’s first “full-dress appearance on English soil” (p. 57) must be established by identi- fying Roderick’s resentment with an alternative...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (4): 415–427.
Published: 01 December 1994
..., Smollett’s Roderick Random arrives in Rio de la Plata near the end of the book in the company of his maternal uncle. Merchant partners, Random and his uncle have come to trade; they are co-owners of a vessel filled with a legal cargo of Guinea slaves and an illegal cargo of European bale goods...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (1): 29–31.
Published: 01 March 1955
..., are the last three chapters of Part I and most of the poetry. 4 For example: Book 111, Chap. 1 : Jarvis: “Tizonu: a romantic name given to the sword of Roderick Diaz de Bivar, the famous Spanish General against the Moors.” Smollett : “Tizona, which is the word in the original, is a romantic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (2): 263–284.
Published: 01 June 1993
... but only appears to belong to them exclusively. Bowen shows Stella’s son Roderick knowing and acting in the same muted way as his mother-and in the same inarticulate way as Louie. Roderick’s decision to revive the Irish estate where he was conceived blends with his irresoluteness in interpreting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 243–244.
Published: 01 June 1944
... such as the Chichester aboard which Smollett served. As the essay progresses, however, it comes to rely more exclusively upon Smollett’s works, thoiigh Professor Jones admits that “little seamanship is to be found in the pages of Roderick Random” (p. 69). The same holds true of all of Smollett’s writings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 241–243.
Published: 01 June 1944
... such as the Chichester aboard which Smollett served. As the essay progresses, however, it comes to rely more exclusively upon Smollett’s works, thoiigh Professor Jones admits that “little seamanship is to be found in the pages of Roderick Random” (p. 69). The same holds true of all of Smollett’s writings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (1): 98–100.
Published: 01 March 1966
..., relations stop nowhere, and the exquisite problem of the artist is eternally but to draw, by a geometry of his own, the circle within which they shall happily appear to do so” (preface to Roderick Hudson [New York, 19071, p. vii). As Franklin in the world of doing and becoming, so James...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (3): 279–281.
Published: 01 September 1955
... that he knew more about it than this. I would suggest, however, that Roderick, the name of Poe’s hero, was suggested by Tieck’s Liebeszauber (181 1 ), accessible to Poe in three translations. The brief sixth chapter on Tieck’s attitude toward America is negative in its results. Like many...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 21–33.
Published: 01 March 1946
..., And the earth lies still to hear How the rivers, gently murmuring, To the sea their tribute bear. . . . (John Oxenford, The Death of King Roderick.) Who had ever such adventure, Holy priest or virgin nun, As befell the Count Arnaldos...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 602–605.
Published: 01 December 2012
... and of gender, attending to the problematic masculinity of the hero of sensibility. For the Scottish author, the question is how to present the “feeling” hero as suffi- ciently masculine to compete in the economic world of eighteenth-­century Britain. In readings of Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 605–609.
Published: 01 December 2012
...- ciently masculine to compete in the economic world of eighteenth-­century Britain. In readings of Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random and Henry Mac­ kenzie’s Man of Feeling, Shields identifies how the picaresque or sentimental novel explores the danger of deviating from the modern nation’s “mascu...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 609–612.
Published: 01 December 2012
...- ciently masculine to compete in the economic world of eighteenth-­century Britain. In readings of Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random and Henry Mac­ kenzie’s Man of Feeling, Shields identifies how the picaresque or sentimental novel explores the danger of deviating from the modern nation’s “mascu...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 616–618.
Published: 01 December 2012
...- ciently masculine to compete in the economic world of eighteenth-­century Britain. In readings of Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random and Henry Mac­ kenzie’s Man of Feeling, Shields identifies how the picaresque or sentimental novel explores the danger of deviating from the modern nation’s “mascu...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (2): 227–250.
Published: 01 June 2002
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 597–602.
Published: 01 December 2012
...- ciently masculine to compete in the economic world of eighteenth-­century Britain. In readings of Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random and Henry Mac­ kenzie’s Man of Feeling, Shields identifies how the picaresque or sentimental novel explores the danger of deviating from the modern nation’s “mascu...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (4): 612–615.
Published: 01 December 2012
... and of gender, attending to the problematic masculinity of the hero of sensibility. For the Scottish author, the question is how to present the “feeling” hero as suffi- ciently masculine to compete in the economic world of eighteenth-­century Britain. In readings of Tobias Smollett’s Roderick Random...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (3): 243–251.
Published: 01 September 1959
... in “ ‘Logical Structure’ in Eighteenth-Century Poetry,” PQ, XXX (1952), 315-36: “AS, in the novel, Tristram Shundy only emphasizes the tendency noticeable in Clarissa, Joseph Andrews, and Roderick Random, in The Spiritual Quixote, The Man of Feeling, and The Adventures of a Guinea, to- ward a small...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 297–311.
Published: 01 September 1968
... in Roderick Hudson and “The Death of the Lion,” though in both instances the men involved (Rowland Mallet and the young journalist) develop rather uncon- vincing loves for women. This theme of “comradely love” carries no hint of sexuality, but does embody the emotional core of the stories...