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rhythm

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 195–221.
Published: 01 June 2009
... to Literature and Political Philosophy . Music on Location: Rhythm, Resonance, and Romanticism in Eichendorff’s Marmorbild John T. Hamilton The metaphor of the little brooks that rustle “to and fro” is brilliantly false, for brooks flow in one direction only, but the back and forth...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (4): 405–412.
Published: 01 December 1967
...D. W. Cummings; John Herum Copyright © 1967 by Duke University Press 1967 METRICAL BOUNDARIES AND RHYTHM-PHRASES By D. W. CUMMINGSand JOHN HERUM The perception of metrical effects depends upon set expectations in the mind of a reader...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (1): 65–80.
Published: 01 March 2016
... rhythm and rhyme, are well suited for theorizing the repetitions of political power through their own intrinsic repetitiveness. Copyright © 2016 by University of Washington 2016 repetition politics rhythm rhyme Spenserian stanza The natural sciences and the quantitative social sciences...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (1): 3–17.
Published: 01 March 1966
..., prescriptive-a kind of ossified form. The Formal- ists, more concerned with what gave life and action to the poem, preferred to focus on rhythm. Like the advocates of Futurism and of free verse, they thought of meter at best as merely the mechanism by which rhythm might be generated...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 302–306.
Published: 01 September 1961
... dessous : lucidit6 ; devenir ; Musique. Or notre art devient justement enivrant d?s qu’il est pris par le rythme et qu’il tend vers la musique.1 If a play is written in verse, it is self-evident that the language the actors speak will possess the element of rhythm. The adoption of a metrical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (1): 133–135.
Published: 01 March 1969
... at this point conclude that either he or Barnes has no ear for poetry. Barnes’s impressionism is equally evident in his treatment of prosody. Failing to distinguish between meter and rhythm, he is unable to recognize the function of meter, either as a structural principle of composition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (4): 339–343.
Published: 01 December 1959
... the range of evidence bearing on textual problems. These arguments employ statistical evidence from the Beowulf text and pursue further the questions of alliteration, rhetoric, and rhythm. The manuscript reading of the on-verse reaes ond hattres leaves no Robert D. Stevick...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (1): 135–141.
Published: 01 March 1969
... of prosody. Failing to distinguish between meter and rhythm, he is unable to recognize the function of meter, either as a structural principle of composition or as the implied arithmetrical norm which makes rhythm possible. Stress for Barnes seems to be determined by the most important words...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 393–421.
Published: 01 December 1986
... instinct which Eliot defines as the feeling for syllable and rhythm, penetrating far below the conscious levels of thought and feeling, invigorating every word; sinking to the most primitive and forgotten, returning to the origin and bringing something back, seeking...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 21–33.
Published: 01 March 1946
... in the broadest sense, and has practically nothing to say about verse rhythm and rime; his comments on verse translation have to do mainly with the translation of Greek and Latin poetry, and there is, of course, no reference to the translation of Spanish ballads. The principle as stated gives...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 105–108.
Published: 01 March 1941
... appear in the Civil War volume-a point which may be made clear if one should glance for a moment at “Pioneers! 0 Pioneers or at “As Toilsome I Wan- der’d Virginia’s Woods.yy (The titles alone indicate how conscious Whitman had become of the necessity of more regular rhythms.) Furthermore...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (2): 168–182.
Published: 01 June 1968
... of excellent commen- tary on the nature of life in Eden before the Fall. Because Milton gave Adam and Eve work to do and delicately adjusted their activity to the rhythm of nature’s changes, the bliss of Paradise cannot be understood except in terms of the pattern of their daily activity. The constant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (1): 117–118.
Published: 01 March 1948
.... Rigid, stereotyped patterns of meter are discarded or re- valued, e.g., the author rightly ignores the strict differentiation between dactyl and anapest when dealing with German two-syllable dips (p. 31). The various chapters on the single verse-line, stanza, rhyme, and rhythm...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 147–161.
Published: 01 March 2009
... unsophisticated. In the 1834 song “Jim Crow” (fig. 6), the melody of the accompaniment is the same for each verse as the vocal melody, which never leaps more than a perfect fourth. The rhythm is also fairly straightforward; the most interesting detail is the dotted figure in the vocal line. The refrain...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (1): 121–141.
Published: 01 March 2016
... am Main : Suhrkamp . Attridge Derek . 1982 . The Rhythms of English Poetry . London : Longman . Banville Théodore de . 1891 . Petit traité de poésie française . Paris . Barthes Roland . 2002a . “ Musica practica .” In Oeuvres complètes , edited by Marty Éric...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 374–375.
Published: 01 September 1950
...” appears as “(when) Many of higher senses ripe / Resembled still their prototype.” The difficplt ottavc rime with their sudden break of rhythm have been rendered very.skillfully. But the changing rhythm has not always been followed. When, after the short, almost staccato, verse describing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (2): 99–117.
Published: 01 June 1954
... in a work of art: the inherent rhythm and symbolic language and ethos of a poet. To this one must add the individual claim and demand which tlie material makes on the creator of a work of art. Michelangelo, for ex- ample, seeks to apprehend the latent form potentially inherent in material...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (3): 379–381.
Published: 01 September 1948
... rhythms in the German lyric. The author is peculiarly fitted for the task. His acquaintance with German poetry in all periods is comprehensive and profound, and he controls the poetic literature of other lands as well as the vast mass of poetic theory and criticism relevant to his explorations...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (4): 479–494.
Published: 01 December 1945
... for many later translations. The trochaic meter, in lines of seven and eight syllables with a strong stress on the seventh, imitates the rhythm of the original ; consonantal rime replaces the assonance, h-u, of the romance. The smooth-flowing verses present the content of the ballad with notable...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 341–350.
Published: 01 September 1968
... vividly pick out that sudden shift of rhythm, to involve one in the ironic sense of a peremptory bulk and grandeur thrusting athwart the trudging tread of the poet’s drudgery. This keen imaginative involvement is the nerve of Dunbar’s vivacity and truth: “And busk him lyk ane bischopis...