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revenger'

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (1): 20–35.
Published: 01 March 1973
...B. J. Layman Copyright © 1973 by Duke University Press 1973 TOURNEUR’S ARTIFICIAL NOON THE DESIGN OF THE REVENGER’S TRAGEDY By B. J. LAYMAN The characters of The Revenger’s Tragedy have “nimble and des- perate tongues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (3): 201–207.
Published: 01 September 1954
... of the skull, and Death shown joining the dance in the masque of revengers. Vindice, himself, may be regarded as a sort of “Docteur,” pointing out the moral and warning all potential sin- ners. There is only one divergence of any consequence: the slaughter in Z%e Revenger‘s Tragedy is not random...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (3): 420–421.
Published: 01 September 1940
...WILLARD FARNHAM Thayer Bowers Fredson. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1940. Pp. viii+288. $3.00. Copyright © 1940 by Duke University Press 1940 420 Reviews Elizabethan Revenge Tragedy: 1587-1642. By FREDSONTHAYER BOWERS. Princeton : Princeton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 223–227.
Published: 01 September 1960
...Robert P. Adams Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 KING LEAR’S REVENGES By ROBERTP. ADAMS In a play filled with grandeur, meanness, and complexly mysterious insights into the human condition, the passage in which Lear pleads, “0...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 331–362.
Published: 01 December 1978
... and to swear Hamlet to revenge, Hamlet inherits also an act of filial obligation. In swearing to revenge his father, he swears in effect to relinquish for a time his personal identity and to unite with his father not merely in name but in actional fact. That is, to assume his father’s cause...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 March 1976
... and violent protagonist on the stage, spends the vast bulk of his play trying in vain to avoid be- coming the revenge hero demanded of him by his father’s ghost and, concomitantly, to avoid participating in such a scene as the final blood- bath. H. D. F. Kitto has convincingly demonstrated...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 263–285.
Published: 01 June 1942
... and the equivalent of a tragic flaw, is the real source of the problems in Bussy D’Ambois and in The Revenge of Bussy D’Ambois. Chapman, who has a well-grounded idea of what tragedy should be, attempts to accom- 1 W. Creizenach, The English Drama in the Age of Shakespeare (Lon- don, 1916), p. 128...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (4): 339–351.
Published: 01 December 1974
... “the final curtain.” After Lucrece has confessed, charged her husband to revenge her upon Tarquin, after the embroidered grief in the speeches by her father and Collatine, we should cry for an end. But Shakespeare carries the story on. Neither he nor his public could forego...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 335–340.
Published: 01 December 1953
... to the structure of the play as a whole.’ 5 A suggestion for the scene is to be found in the twenty-fourth book of the Iliad, in which Andromache foretells the slaying of hf; son by some Greek seeking revenge on Hector, who “never spared a foe. Translated by Pope (Heritage Press, 1945), p...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 193–196.
Published: 01 June 1984
... father’s command, to adopt the assigned role of revenger, while at the same time establishing his own independent identity. Calderwood compares Hamlet’s problem with Shakespeare’s problem of how to construct a play that defines itself, that satisfies generic expectations and yet is unique...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (4): 352–363.
Published: 01 December 1974
... as tragedy ruled by divine Providence. Also beyond present limits are in-depth critiques of what seem to be the most radical late Elizabethan tragedies of state: Greville’s first Mustaplza (ca. 1596-1600); Marston’s Antonio ancl Mellicla and Antonio’s Revenge (both 1599); Shakespeare’s Julius...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (1): 67–86.
Published: 01 March 1982
..., and Polyphontes’ tragic fall; in Electra Orestes’ return for revenge, Electra’s reunion with her brother, and the fall of Clytemnestra and Aegisthus. In both plays the avenging son and his mentor reveal their plans in introductory scenes; the recognition scene between family members occurs cli...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 142–157.
Published: 01 June 1960
... asks whether revenge is a course of action compatible with wisdom. Certainly the one who is the first to offend does the most evil, but he that seeks revenge deserves blame because the injury will of necessity follow. It is absurd to seek revenge when it involves danger, and it is ignoble...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 191–193.
Published: 01 June 1984
... to accept his father’s command, to adopt the assigned role of revenger, while at the same time establishing his own independent identity. Calderwood compares Hamlet’s problem with Shakespeare’s problem of how to construct a play that defines itself, that satisfies generic expectations and yet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (1): 5–24.
Published: 01 March 1990
... be, are nevertheless disturbers of the social and political spheres also, extremists who must be removed. Likewise the puritanical ex- tremist Pentheus is punished in The Bacchantes, even though Dionysus’s revenge ensnares his own devotees, Agave and her sisters. The two extremists Creon and Antigone suffer...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 297–299.
Published: 01 September 1982
... conservative, is intent on no such novelty; he offers nothing incredible or radical. He recognizes that there are “certain things that recur in Marston’s plays-for example, the themes and images of lust, pride, envy, Fortune (and her wheel), disease and corruption, infidelity, and revenge” (p. 9...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (2): 137–146.
Published: 01 June 1954
... and the Poe-English feuds2 and as a sublimation of Poe’s desire for revenge upon Hiram Fuller, editor of the New York Even- ing Mirror and the New York and upon Dr. Thomas Dunn English. 1 The War of the Literati refers to the verbal sallies and consequent slander...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 207–209.
Published: 01 June 1963
... the trifold persona of the satires to a char- acter rooted in the action.” On the other hand, there is ethical consistency as implied by the two tragedies. Antonio’s Revenge has “a complexity produced by satiric intrusions,” while Sophonisbo is perhaps “the simplest, most homo- geneous...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 246–249.
Published: 01 June 2020
..., Bate relies on uninterrogated general terms and concepts. He assumes their transparency. “Shakespeare deploys the word ‘revenge’ and its cognates more than two hundred times in the corpus of his works, but instead of bringing the figure on stage as a Chorus, he allows his characters to internalize...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (1): 77–105.
Published: 01 March 1996
.... But in that becoming, he exposes her and that is his revenge. Her lack of confidence is corrobo- rated by his lack of love. Excluded from the circle of desire are the husband and his family: That consuming love, woman’s everlasting m’ de coeur, ‘When you have a child of your own, you’ll know...