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revenge

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1940) 1 (3): 420–421.
Published: 01 September 1940
...WILLARD FARNHAM Thayer Bowers Fredson. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1940. Pp. viii+288. $3.00. Copyright © 1940 by Duke University Press 1940 420 Reviews Elizabethan Revenge Tragedy: 1587-1642. By FREDSONTHAYER BOWERS. Princeton : Princeton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1973) 34 (1): 20–35.
Published: 01 March 1973
...B. J. Layman Copyright © 1973 by Duke University Press 1973 TOURNEUR’S ARTIFICIAL NOON THE DESIGN OF THE REVENGER’S TRAGEDY By B. J. LAYMAN The characters of The Revenger’s Tragedy have “nimble and des- perate tongues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1960) 21 (3): 223–227.
Published: 01 September 1960
...Robert P. Adams Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 KING LEAR’S REVENGES By ROBERTP. ADAMS In a play filled with grandeur, meanness, and complexly mysterious insights into the human condition, the passage in which Lear pleads, “0...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1954) 15 (3): 201–207.
Published: 01 September 1954
...Samuel Schoenbaum © 1954 University of Washington 1954 THE REVENGERS TRAGEDY: JACOBEAN DANCE OF DEATH By SAMUELSCHOENBAUM Writers on the Elizabethan drama have described The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1978) 39 (4): 331–362.
Published: 01 December 1978
... his story and to swear Hamlet to revenge, Hamlet inherits also an act of filial obligation. In swearing to revenge his father, he swears in effect to relinquish for a time his personal identity and to unite with his father not merely in name but in actional fact. That is, to assume his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1976) 37 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 March 1976
... violent protagonist on the stage, spends the vast bulk of his play trying in vain to avoid be- coming the revenge hero demanded of him by his father’s ghost and, concomitantly, to avoid participating in such a scene as the final blood- bath. H. D. F. Kitto has convincingly demonstrated that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1942) 3 (2): 263–285.
Published: 01 June 1942
... humanity and the equivalent of a tragic flaw, is the real source of the problems in Bussy D’Ambois and in The Revenge of Bussy D’Ambois. Chapman, who has a well-grounded idea of what tragedy should be, attempts to accom- 1 W. Creizenach, The English Drama in the Age of Shakespeare (Lon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1953) 14 (4): 335–340.
Published: 01 December 1953
... structure of the play as a whole.’ 5 A suggestion for the scene is to be found in the twenty-fourth book of the Iliad, in which Andromache foretells the slaying of hf; son by some Greek seeking revenge on Hector, who “never spared a foe. Translated by Pope (Heritage Press, 1945), p...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1982) 43 (3): 297–299.
Published: 01 September 1982
... corruption, infidelity, and revenge” (p. 9), but instead of trying to fit all the plays into one interlocking pattern, he approaches each play “on its own terms” (p. 9). What this turns out to mean is that one of these themes, or some variant, is chosen for each play: the wheel of fortune for The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1984) 45 (2): 191–193.
Published: 01 June 1984
... himself: how to accept his father’s command, to adopt the assigned role of revenger, while at the same time establishing his own independent identity. Calderwood compares Hamlet’s problem with Shakespeare’s problem of how to construct a play that defines itself, that satisfies generic expectations...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1963) 24 (2): 207–209.
Published: 01 June 1963
... gradually from the trifold persona of the satires to a char- acter rooted in the action.” On the other hand, there is ethical consistency as implied by the two tragedies. Antonio’s Revenge has “a complexity produced by satiric intrusions,” while Sophonisbo is perhaps “the simplest, most...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1984) 45 (2): 193–196.
Published: 01 June 1984
... his father’s command, to adopt the assigned role of revenger, while at the same time establishing his own independent identity. Calderwood compares Hamlet’s problem with Shakespeare’s problem of how to construct a play that defines itself, that satisfies generic expectations and yet is unique...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1956) 17 (3): 273.
Published: 01 September 1956
... tragedy among the Jacobeans. Two of the plays upon which this conclusion is based may or may not be Middleton’s. The Revenger’s Tragedy is usually attributed to Tourneur, and The Second Maiden’s Tragcdy has n:ver been satisfactorily connected with any author. Although in recent years...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1974) 35 (4): 339–351.
Published: 01 December 1974
... modern audiences would call “the final curtain.” After Lucrece has confessed, charged her husband to revenge her upon Tarquin, after the embroidered grief in the speeches by her father and Collatine, we should cry for an end. But Shakespeare carries the story on. Neither he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1948) 9 (4): 412–414.
Published: 01 December 1948
... revenge by causing a woman to sin, in this case, the innocent Mary Magdalene.* The World sends Sensuality, his messenger, to summon Flesh to Satan’s council; upon Flesh‘s arrival, Satan begins the debate on Mary. (Compare, in P.L., Book I, Satan’s speech to the demons in hell and their...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1974) 35 (4): 352–363.
Published: 01 December 1974
... as tragedy ruled by divine Providence. Also beyond present limits are in-depth critiques of what seem to be the most radical late Elizabethan tragedies of state: Greville’s first Mustaplza (ca. 1596-1600); Marston’s Antonio ancl Mellicla and Antonio’s Revenge (both 1599); Shakespeare’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1981) 42 (4): 395–397.
Published: 01 December 1981
... situation is echoed in “The Last Tournament,” it is through ironic half-reversal: whereas Pelleas’s revenge has been to place the sword across the necks of the sleeping lovers, “Mark’s way” is to cleave Tristram’s skull from behind. Knightly treachery is simultaneously the revenge of the injured...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1940) 1 (2): 268–269.
Published: 01 June 1940
... Monographs, Studies in Literature and Philology No. 2, April, 1940. Pp. iii+184. $1.25. Bowers, F. T. Elizabethan Revenge Tragedy 1587-1642. Princeton L-niversity Press, 1940. Pp. vii+284. $3.00. Chaucer, G. The Canterbury Tales, text of. Studied on the basis of all known manuscripts...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1947) 8 (3): 368–369.
Published: 01 September 1947
... evident to which of these works one is referred until he has read the entire paragraph. Or again, one wonders in paragraph 421 why Muller should first suggest that At- tila’s death, interpreted as KriemhiId’s revenge, underlies the Nibe- lungen story and then five lines down he should...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1974) 35 (3): 302–316.
Published: 01 September 1974
... town’s destruction of Claire’s reputation and her revenge on the town, Claire’s statement that she has become hell (p. 280) and her conversion of the town into a hell, and Claire’s soullessness in prosperity, which she transfers to the town. This internal evidence identifies the town of Gullen...