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radcliffe

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (1): 29–55.
Published: 01 March 2014
...Jesse Molesworth The manipulation of local time, or clock time, constitutes a vital aspect of gothic storytelling, as seen in Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto , Matthew Lewis’s Monk , and Ann Radcliffe’s novels. Several concepts emerge: the importance of the hour as a temporal unit...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (3): 253–271.
Published: 01 September 1986
...Evan Radcliffe Copyright © 1986 by Duke University Press 1986 KEATS, IDEALS, AND ISA B ELLA By EVAN KADCLIFFE In the summer of 1818, during a walking tour of northern Eng- land and Scotland, Keats visited the cottage of Robert Burns, hop- ing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (2): 251–254.
Published: 01 June 2016
... not to forget, a memorial “stands for a mode of commemoration that admits the inevitability of forgetting and that seeks to preserve not what has been lost, but rather its remembered image” (14). Sentimental Memorials devotes chapters to Sophia Lee, Ann Radcliffe, Charlotte Smith, and Mary Robinson, writers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (3): 334–336.
Published: 01 September 1994
...Eric Rothstein Hill David. Radcliffe. Baltimore, Md.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1993. xvi + 232 pp. $38.50. Copyright © 1994 by Duke University Press 1994 334 MLQ I September 1994 Forms of &fiction: Genre and Culture in Meditational...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (1): 102–105.
Published: 01 March 2019
... novelists conceived of their works as narrative machines is thus open to question, depending as it does on four primary examples: Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess , Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones , Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy , and Ann Radcliffe’s Mysteries of Udolpho . Yet Orr’s otherwise persuasive...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 633–643.
Published: 01 December 1996
... appropriations of chivalrous sentimentality for politically conservative purposes-the “family values” of another day-afFected the gender position of women writers. “As Wollstonecraft, Burney, and Radcliffe severally show, sentimental man, having taken over once-fem- inine attributes, leaves to women only...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (3): 263–294.
Published: 01 September 1991
... W0LLSTONECMFI”S LEl77BS FROM NOR WAY tural splitting of the familiar categories of landscape description, the sublime, the beautiful, and the picturesque. Ann Radcliffe, another enthusiast of the picturesque whose works flourished during the decade of the 1790s, provides an instructive ana...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (4): 429–436.
Published: 01 December 1951
... part of the century : on the one side, there were those who wished to minimize the supernatural element, and who therefore admired Mrs. Radcliffe’s device of the 1 J. B. Heidler, The History, from 1700 to 1800, of English Criticism of Prose Fiction, University of Illinois Studies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (3): 336–338.
Published: 01 September 1994
..., is disappointing. Nonetheless, I hope that Forms of fijec- tion gets the positive attention it deserves. Although it leaves the hard theo- retical work for others, or perhaps Radcliffe himself, it may help to provoke readers into the systematic thought that it scants. One of its virtues is its treatment...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 366–368.
Published: 01 September 1951
... bourgeois realism, Goldsmith’s benevolence, Smollett’s quixotic zeal (Launcelot Greaves), Sterne’s eccentricity (so mad, so wise, so gay, as Diderot called it), Miss Burney’s manners transcript, Bage’s utopian amelioratives, Miss Radcliffe’s Udolphian horrors, Godwin’s political polemicism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 201–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
.... Its clearest expression was prob- ably given by Radcliffe: “that delicious melancholy which no person, who had felt it once, would resign for the gayest pleasures,” a sentiment that can “waken our best and purest feelings, disposing us to benevo- lence, pity, and friendship.”25 24...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 119–123.
Published: 01 March 2002
... in the Regency, anthologies become the voice of the people. At the same time, they create differences between audiences. Her second chapter elucidates some of the hybrid forms, exemplified by Vicesimus Knox’s Elegant Extracts, Ann Radcliffe’s epigraph-studded gothic fictions, and several editors’ exam...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 123–126.
Published: 01 March 2002
... in the Regency, anthologies become the voice of the people. At the same time, they create differences between audiences. Her second chapter elucidates some of the hybrid forms, exemplified by Vicesimus Knox’s Elegant Extracts, Ann Radcliffe’s epigraph-studded gothic fictions, and several editors’ exam...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 126–130.
Published: 01 March 2002
..., they create differences between audiences. Her second chapter elucidates some of the hybrid forms, exemplified by Vicesimus Knox’s Elegant Extracts, Ann Radcliffe’s epigraph-studded gothic fictions, and several editors’ exam- inations of Shakespeare, that publishers contrived to control the audience. She...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 130–133.
Published: 01 March 2002
... in the Regency, anthologies become the voice of the people. At the same time, they create differences between audiences. Her second chapter elucidates some of the hybrid forms, exemplified by Vicesimus Knox’s Elegant Extracts, Ann Radcliffe’s epigraph-studded gothic fictions, and several editors’ exam...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 133–136.
Published: 01 March 2002
... in the Regency, anthologies become the voice of the people. At the same time, they create differences between audiences. Her second chapter elucidates some of the hybrid forms, exemplified by Vicesimus Knox’s Elegant Extracts, Ann Radcliffe’s epigraph-studded gothic fictions, and several editors’ exam...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 136–140.
Published: 01 March 2002
... in the Regency, anthologies become the voice of the people. At the same time, they create differences between audiences. Her second chapter elucidates some of the hybrid forms, exemplified by Vicesimus Knox’s Elegant Extracts, Ann Radcliffe’s epigraph-studded gothic fictions, and several editors’ exam...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (2): 237–239.
Published: 01 June 1944
... of ( 1) George Gascoigne, (2) Sir Nicholas Bacon, (3) Sir James Dyer, (4) Thomas Radcliffe, Earl of Sussex, (5) Francis, Earl of Bedford (Lord Russell), and (h), belatedly, Sir Philip Sidney. The author concludes by citing ap- provingly the opinion of Professor Stauffer that “Whetstone might...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 364–366.
Published: 01 September 1951
... called it), Miss Burney’s manners transcript, Bage’s utopian amelioratives, Miss Radcliffe’s Udolphian horrors, Godwin’s political polemicism is Deism, only if we allow the new philosophy to be all of these things. Ostensibly, it is not. Professor Foster’s difficulties are conspicuously...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2005) 66 (2): 253–255.
Published: 01 June 2005
.... Nowhere is the choice of texts explained: there is one chapter on Defoe, one on Fielding, then one on Defoe and Fielding, with glances at Sterne and Mackenzie. The two fi nal chapters are on Radcliffe and Scott. Just as evidence of shift in objectifi cation and disembedding is about to be pre- sented...