1-20 of 59 Search Results for

prospero

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1995) 56 (2): 111–144.
Published: 01 June 1995
... Prospero’s slave: “This lack of familiarity [with names of the heroes among the Caracas of Venezuela] is but another proof of our subjection to the colonialist perspective of history that has been imposed on us, causing names, dates, circumstances, and truths to vanish from our consciousness...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1970) 31 (1): 3–21.
Published: 01 March 1970
...Melvin Seiden Copyright © 1970 by Duke University Press 1970 UTOPIANISM IN THE TEMPEST By MELVINSEIDEN Remote, “uninhabitable,” and uncivilized though Prospero’s island is made to seem, it is not, in any Hobbesian or Lockean sense, in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1953) 14 (3): 258–273.
Published: 01 September 1953
...Bernard Baum Copyright © 1953 by Duke University Press 1953 TEMPEST AND HAIRY APE THE LITERARY INCARNATION OF MYTHOS By BERNARDBAUM When human society broke upon the sight of Prospero’s daughter, there leapt that well-known response...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1980) 41 (1): 73–87.
Published: 01 March 1980
... ripeness, And the ripeness all. (p. 202) Auden develops this equation of silence and ripeness, and the opposi- tion of both to the play-spirit, in “Prospero to Ariel.” It will be obvious here that I completely disagree with Lucy and John McDiarmid in their interpretation of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1985) 46 (1): 92–95.
Published: 01 March 1985
... artist and as a symbol of man’s ambiguous place in the universe (pp. 34-35). She then devotes a longish chapter each to Friar Bacon, Doctor Faustus, Bussy D’Ambois, and Prospero, before concluding with a chapter on the masque. In these analyses Traister is adroit, sensible, and persuasive in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1941) 2 (3): 510–512.
Published: 01 September 1941
... facts. Discussion of The Tempest exemplifies the critic’s method. AS always, Stoll defends a thesis, combating here those who would make of this drama a mere allegory, with Ariel presenting the spirit of poetry, Caliban the spirit of prose, and Prospero the author him- self bidding...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1941) 2 (3): 512–514.
Published: 01 September 1941
... prose, and Prospero the author him- self bidding farewell to the stage. Each one of these assumptions he shows to be irrational, but he goes further to characterize both Ariel and Caliban as actual and convincing figures whose geniuses reside in the world of men. Ariel’s work is play...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1949) 10 (1): 3–15.
Published: 01 March 1949
... “Prince Prospero” who, “with a thousand . . . knights and dames of his court” has “retired to the deep seclusion of one of his castellated abbeys.” This omission of date and geographical place, in designed contrast to some stories of the romanticists and other writers iiicluding himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2003) 64 (3): 389–392.
Published: 01 September 2003
... Schmidt Žnds distinctively, though not uniquely, Dutch. The book’s Žrst footnote recalls that in The Tempest Shakespeare balances Miranda’s wonder at a “brave new world” with Prospero’s canny rejoinder, “’Tis new to thee.” Like Prospero, Schmidt cautions his readers against exaggerating...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2002) 63 (1): 65–88.
Published: 01 March 2002
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2019) 80 (1): 51–74.
Published: 01 March 2019
... father or the play’s narrative. Indeed, Prospero gives her virtually no room to wander, carefully monitoring her interactions with Ferdinand and arranging their dynastic marriage, which guarantees the succession. 10 As Melissa E. Sanchez ( 2008 : 67) argues, “Miranda’s consent to the marriage on which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1994) 55 (2): 223–225.
Published: 01 June 1994
... “king plays,” including The TmFt,which Billington sees as anti-utopian despite Prospero’s resemblance to “a courtly Christmas prince” (248). Some readers may feel at this point that the author belabors her thesis too strongly, yielding to a temptation to turn every reference to a mound of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1969) 30 (4): 611–613.
Published: 01 December 1969
..., while in Macbeth they presage the temporary destruction of inno- cence and virtue. Similarly, not everyone will share Wickham’s view that when Prospero, with every third thought devoted to his grave, be- queathes his island to Caliban, a creature compounded of the impure SYLVAN...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2015) 76 (3): 393–396.
Published: 01 September 2015
... safety of land is Miranda’s distress as a spectator of the shipwreck in Shakespeare’s Tempest (1.2). In this ur-scene of dramatic pity, Prospero deflects Miranda’s sympathy for others to a care for her self and finally to sleep. The play’s elegiac tone comes partly from the ephemerality of any...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2003) 64 (3): 384–389.
Published: 01 September 2003
... new world” with Prospero’s canny rejoinder, “’Tis new to thee.” Like Prospero, Schmidt cautions his readers against exaggerating America’s novelty for Europe and observes how swiftly America was pressed into the service of European alliances and rivalries, how the New World was drafted into...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1942) 3 (2): 235–242.
Published: 01 June 1942
... following two passages: Faral, chap. 16; Griscom 1.11 St. Gall Inter haec et alia, duobus die- Inter haec et alia duobus die- bus et una nocte prospero vento- bus et una nocte prospero ven- rum flatu concurrerunt applicue- torum flatu cucurrerunt appli- runtque in quamdam insulam, vo...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1964) 25 (3): 346–355.
Published: 01 September 1964
... the logic of a machine. It is present even in The Tempest (which Kott considers as a tragedy), for Prospero, who has lost his dukedom to his disloyal brother, has, in taking over the island, himself dispossessed Caliban. Sebastian, too, though shipwrecked and hundreds of miles from the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1966) 27 (3): 270–284.
Published: 01 September 1966
... stamp’d upon it” (I.i.49-51) has come true in a way he never dreamed: the metal is brass stamped with a character that the world can read. The Duke, then, controls his play from the start. He is a Viennese Prospero, and the commissioning of Angelo is the created shipwreck which will begin...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1985) 46 (4): 453–456.
Published: 01 December 1985
... ungainly (“Cymbeline is . . . an intertextual mixture of several texts . . . that come together in the artist’s mind, sparking his production of a text that differs from the others” [p. 140 sometimes hard to fathom (“Prospero, for Ferdinand, constitutes both an opaque and a transparent text” [p...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1986) 47 (2): 194–197.
Published: 01 June 1986
... Othello, say, or Prospero. Metadramatic critics have long called to our attention Shakespeare’s persistent concern with language, with the challenge of using a medium he seems always to find artificial and suspect. Fineman’s major accomplishment, at least for me, is that he has gone farther than...