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polonius

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (4): 441–463.
Published: 01 December 2013
.... The “double blessing” that Polonius gives Laertes shows this ritual comically, as do those of earlier sons Launce and Launcelot in The Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Merchant of Venice ; All’s Well That Ends Well renders it confusingly in feudal transition into a new age. King Lear offers it in the peaceful...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (2): 115–136.
Published: 01 June 1981
...- curs, it returns to being the plausible utterance of a dramatic character. That scene begins with the entrance of Claudius, Gertrude, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, and an unspecified number of “Lords.” In response to Claudius’s opening question, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 331–362.
Published: 01 December 1978
... with their concrete universality, or lack of it. ?‘he play presents us with one Ophelia, one Gertrude, one Laertes, one Polonius, one Horatio, one Osric, and so on. That these characters require only a forename suggests their singularity-though not their individuality , for they certainly have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 135–154.
Published: 01 June 1979
...- tiously silent Hamlet, who, summoned outside by Horatio and Mar- cellus, himself joins the vigil. When the Ghost reappears, Horatio and Marcellus follow, carefully observing the meeting. Polonius hatches the plot to spy on Hamlet and Qphelia, and Claudius employs Rosencrantz and Guildenstern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 163–200.
Published: 01 June 2011
... (1.2.52 – 53, 56). Having assured Laertes the grant of any request of “reason,” and having ascertained that Laertes has already obtained his father Polonius’s consent (1.2.44 – 45), Claudius graciously allows him the “negative” freedom to go where and to do as he wishes by bidding 7  See...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 March 1976
... that Hamlet is doomed from the moment he kills Polonius (p. 192) and yet sees him as transformed into God’s minister by the end of the play (a conversion she feels but cannot explain); reduces the tragic experience by seeing it as avoidable if only Hamlet had not followed bad advice (a view...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (4): 483–511.
Published: 01 December 1993
.... As “the glass of fashion and the mould of form,” in the panopticon of the court Hamlet is “th’ observed of all observers” (3.1.154-55). Yet (undeterred by Polonius’s spying, Ophelia’s pity, or Claudius’s sus- picion) he dons an “antic disposition” (1.5.172). So, free to play in public, he watches those...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 323–332.
Published: 01 December 1952
...-precisely the emotional lack which he will later find in himself. I, iii. The Polonius-Laertes sub-plot is introduced; the theme, how- ever, continues on a secondary level. Ophelia is warned of Hamlet’s impulsive ardor, “a toy in blood, / A violet in the youth of primy nature, / Forward...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 1997
... to try to deter- mine what is bothering Hamlet, Claudius and Polonius plan to eaves- drop on an encounter between Hamlet and Ophelia. Claudius has summoned Hamlet to this place: “We have closely sent for Hamlet hither” (3.1.29).Polonius and Claudius go into hiding but remain within earshot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 432–447.
Published: 01 December 1953
... on Delacroix;7 Janin and others of the influence of Delacroix on the actors. All were right. The first gravedigger in Hamlet became an important character, and we know that when Sarah Bernhardt played the leading role, Coquelin gave up the role of Polonius for the part of the gravedigger...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 125–126.
Published: 01 March 1942
... plan to slay Claudius and hides the body of Polonius in order to give himself time to carry out his plot. He sees Hamlet in this situation, not as hesitant, but as delayed with a twofold action, the slaying of the king and the conversion of his mother. In some instances the author shows...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 362–363.
Published: 01 September 1950
... for later audiences. L. B. Campbell, assuming soundly that no amount of extra-literary annotation can tell us how to interpret a character in a play, proceeds to show that within the play Polonius is an ignoble busybody, that his knowledge of Elizabethan wisdom literature does not make him...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 214–215.
Published: 01 June 1952
... in Shakespeare’s comedy (p. 408), he seems to limit “comic” to low comedy, an impression reenforced by his discussion of Polonius (p. 281). This semantic difficulty arises to plague every writer upon comedy and makes desir- able a careful delimitation of terms. It would be particularly helpful when...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (2): 174–176.
Published: 01 June 1982
... Gloucester as a traitor and finds a more appropriate parent in Cornwall (“thou shalt find a dearer father in my love and, in a more complex vein, on the two parallel parts of Hamlet 1I.i (Hirsh’s scene 6), in which Polonius recruits first Keynaldo and then Ophelia as spies, abusing and misusing son...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (4): 381–383.
Published: 01 December 1980
... generalizations to himself, as Grudin claims: the speech in fact establishes him as more of a Polonius than a Hamlet, its jingly tetrameter couplets mirroring his characteristic pleasure in overly neat solu- tions. This book, then, itself generates critical responses that might be termed “mighty...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 246–249.
Published: 01 June 2020
... that . . . might be described as the second-order phenomenon of self-examination”; therefore Hamlet is “essentially a Christianised version of Seneca’s discourse on providence” (228–29). First, what would be a first-order phenomenon of examination? Examination of others? As in the spying of Polonius on Prince...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 363–365.
Published: 01 September 1950
... explain its effectiveness for later audiences. L. B. Campbell, assuming soundly that no amount of extra-literary annotation can tell us how to interpret a character in a play, proceeds to show that within the play Polonius is an ignoble busybody, that his knowledge of Elizabethan wisdom...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (4): 320–338.
Published: 01 December 1987
... his audience to regard verbal insufficiency as a general failing. Like the King, Bertram’s mother often futilely scatters sayings in Bertram’s and Helena’s ears. If her advice to Bertram as he leaves for Paris (see I.i.57-66) resembles that of Polonius when Laertes departs for France...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (3): 313–343.
Published: 01 September 1998
.... The entire production of Hamlet within this novel seems bent on supplanting parents. The cast- ing of Claudius and Gertrude is barely mentioned: they end up being played by Madame Melina and the actor known as the Blusterer [der Polterer], whereas Polonius is played by Serlo, Ophelia by Aurelie...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (4): 404–407.
Published: 01 December 1984
... as the author shows us the Polonius plot follows the Hamlet plot early in Hamlet; or that the masked ball in Act I1 of Much Ado adumbrates the later maskings in which Margaret is taken for Hero and Hero for her imaginary cousin. One understands why Hartwig would pass by the most brilliant proleptic...