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physiognomy

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (2): 137–152.
Published: 01 June 1981
...Michael G. Ketcham Copyright © 1981 by Duke University Press 1981 THE ARTS OF GESTURE THE SPECTATOR AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PHYSIOGNOMY, PAINTING, AND THE THEATER By MICHAELG. KETCHAM In Spectator No. 4, Richard Steele...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (4): 445–469.
Published: 01 December 1998
...: for cover pur- poses (and despite the wealth of visual and popular literary material summoned in the book itself), what is beneath the American Renais- sance is beneath representation.4 The physiognomies of the Renais- 3 Reynolds, Beneath the American Renaissance: The Subversive Imagination...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 133–134.
Published: 01 March 1947
... that “the translator of skaldic verse . . . must nowise discard those features . . . which give it its peculiar physiognomy-neither the consistent alliterative scheme . . . nor the syllable-counting . . . nor its prevailing trochaic cadence and the feminine ending of the lines.” But in executing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (4): 328–345.
Published: 01 December 1980
... was repeated endlessly. To admirers of Socrates it en- gagingly exemplified his modesty and humor; to detractors it con- firmed what they had suspected all along. More particularly, however, the story became the proof-text for all writers on physiognomy. Not only did it have the wisest man...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 December 1949
... of something like a general physiognomy of the European mind of the period, always remem- bering, however, that sensations of horror, of the plentitude of power, of bitter- ness in the collapse of the Weltanschauung are expressed with the strongest possible display of passion and eccentricity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 1944
... does not pretend it to be. But, for the student of literature or of intellectual history, the false notions men have held are as important as the true; therefore the attention Thorn- dike pays to astrology, alchemy, chiromancy, physiognomy, and witchcraft increases the usefulness of his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (2): 199–201.
Published: 01 June 1959
... results in the preservation of 200 Reviews Goldsmith’s frailties, which continue to be the most memorable portion of any biography of this enigmatic personality. Yet, rather than share the amusement his contemporaries found in his uncomely physiognomy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (1): 64–80.
Published: 01 March 1952
... the writer : physiognomy and what Lichtenberg, following Nicolai, later called “pathognomy,” fleeting facial expressions which through frequent repetition may become permanent features. At the age of twenty-two he had lectured on the need for the student of man to acquire skill...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 431–458.
Published: 01 December 1940
... of Chaucer’s reading was much more secular than ser- mons, as Professor W. C. Curry has proved to the shocked admira- tion of scholarship in his essay “The Secret of Chaucer’s Par- doner.”18 From a study of the physiognomy literature, Mr. Curry shows that the ecclesiast had the physical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 528–531.
Published: 01 December 1949
... Shakespeare in terms of something like a general physiognomy of the European mind of the period, always remem- bering, however, that sensations of horror, of the plentitude of power, of bitter- ness in the collapse of the Weltanschauung are expressed with the strongest possible display of passion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (1): 100–104.
Published: 01 March 1982
...: An Ajipi.onch to Romtinti- cisni. Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press; London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1982. xvi + 264 pp. $27.50. Tytler, Graeme. Physiognomy in the Eziropecin Novel: Faces and Fortunes. I’ri nceton : Princeton University Press, 1982. xx + 436 pp. $28.50...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 386–391.
Published: 01 December 1963
... of Hogarth’s Art,” Journal of the Warburg and Courfazild Institutes, XV (1952), 191. However, the contemporary interest in physiognomy was so widespread as to make any firm attributions of influ- ence somewhat doubtful. See Henry Knight Miller, Essays on Fielding’s “Miscellun~ies” (Princeton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (3): 299–321.
Published: 01 September 1997
... set it aside. Romanticists now concentrate primarily on scientific discourses that, like mesmerism and physiognomy, are no longer used by anyone to guide interaction with the world. Such discourses are no less “scientific” than chem- istry- the term pseudoscience has no place in historical...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 180–188.
Published: 01 June 1950
.... Traditionally it was “bearded like the pard.”6 It was characterized by “a Crab-tree looke, a sowre countenance, and a hard favoured visage.”6 Commenting upon types known to physiognomy, Ben Jonson pays detailed attention to “your souldiers face, a menacing, and astounding face, that lookes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (4): 415–427.
Published: 01 December 1994
... banknotes to his newly discovered relatives and then exits, announcing that he has “done the Duty of a Grandfather” (92). Announced by strong instinctual feeling and corroborated by familiar physiognomy, the consanguineal connection across genera- tions in Austen’s parody is ratified...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 227–236.
Published: 01 September 1963
.... He intends the plot as a joke on the Reeve, but he has in himself enough of that which he embodies and punishes in his own characters. His is the lechery suggested by his physiognomy and bagpipes.24 His is also the vainglory which makes him insist that he go before the monk, a pilgrim...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 195–206.
Published: 01 June 1940
... no possible purpose, as when he revises the description of the black fish given in one of the sources for the chapter on “cetology” from “the angles of the lips are curved upwards, giving the physiognomy of the animal an innocent, smiling expression” to “the inner angles of his lips are curved...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (1): 48–64.
Published: 01 March 1981
... for isolation, his misanthropy is no more than a pose. He soon complains more about the “dearth of the human physiognomy” (p. 130) than of his illness. Yorkshire has its charms in summer, to be sure; when the weather is fine, there is “noth- ing more divine, than those glens shut in by hills, and those...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2007) 68 (3): 417–436.
Published: 01 September 2007
... to speak of style as the “physiognomy” of the “spirit of the age,” the “race,” the “nation,” or politicoeco- nomic systems (as Whitman’s “poetry of democracy” or Marx’s culture of capitalism). This concretization starts with the Hegelian notion that there is no spirit outside social practice...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 505–525.
Published: 01 December 2006
... force, therefore, secures unique identity. Eclectic origins are transformed as if by consuming fire: “what is past and alien” becomes fuel for the expression of signature forms of an original physiognomy.20 But Nietzsche also echoes Herder in the complementary notion of the experiential...