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phoneme

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 5–8.
Published: 01 March 1942
.... This difference is sometimes taken to be ph0nemic.l Most authori- ties, however, recognize only one phoneme in such cases. In a recent paper, I followed the conventional interpretation, accord- ing to which a syllable with sonantal liquid or nasal is a mere phonetic variant of a standard or normal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 472–475.
Published: 01 September 1942
... the Atlas evidence plus the history of westward migration would suggest. Professor Kemp Malone’s analysis of the phonemes and pho- nemic structure of modern English is an expansion and in certain minor instances a modification of his previous phoneme-studies (American Speech, XI, 205-18...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
...Carroll E. Reed Copyright © 1945 by Duke University Press 1947 A SURVEY OF PENNSYLVANIA GERMAN PHONOLOGY By CARROLLE. REED A. PHONEMICSTRUCTURE The following table is designed to illustrate the phonemes of Pennsylvania German1 according...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 175–184.
Published: 01 June 1940
... classifications, and of new attitudes toward the use and study of our language. Among the most significant illustrations of what I have just said are the phoneme, the morpheme, and the semanteme. After arguing for some decades about the individual and presumably exact charac- ters of certain speech...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (3): 262–263.
Published: 01 September 1957
... is enthusiastic enough about the book to adopt it for class use, he wishes to point out what seem to be a few fundamental drawbacks in the work. These may be summarized as the uncritical acceptance of analytic dogmas, one of which is the Smith-Trager treatment of English vowel phonemes, the other...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (3): 263–264.
Published: 01 September 1957
... use, he wishes to point out what seem to be a few fundamental drawbacks in the work. These may be summarized as the uncritical acceptance of analytic dogmas, one of which is the Smith-Trager treatment of English vowel phonemes, the other is glottochronology. While the latter will either...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1963
... relationship of Middle English long open and close mid vowels with the short high and mid vowels, respectively, is also demonstrable in examples of lengthening, e.g., OE wicu, zvudu, stelan, stolen. The positing of two ME phonemes, /h/ and /x/, rather than one, is un- necessary, since...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (1): 17–46.
Published: 01 March 1994
... is created by the grammar and lexicon of the language, the sound by segmental and suprasegmental phonemes whose qualities do not bear on the linguistic meaning. This sound, organized in poetry by both the grammar and the prosody, is com- monly referred to as the music.’ The notion that two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
... on the phonology the reader is hereby referred to Reed’s Our phonetic symbols differ from Reed’s in the following particu- lars, which are further elucidated in the text below : (1) Where Reed uses the phonemic symbol /a/ we use variously [a], [ae], and [ae (See Nos. V-VII.) (2) Occasionally...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly 11196159.
Published: 03 June 2024
...., lines), others smaller (e.g., phonemes) that both form and fracture a poem s language. After the loosely tetrameter tercets of part 1, the poem proceeds through clipped, variably rhymed free verse stanzas (part 2), strictly endrhymed tetrameter couplets (part 3), and nally a range of stanza lengths...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (4): 339–343.
Published: 01 December 1959
... within fixed limits of phonemic count, would in itself create rhythm. This has been a regular assumption. In speech sounds rhythm necessarily implies regularity within a temporal sequence. And so long as repeated sounds form the structure of the rhythm, they must occur at relatively fixed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 375–377.
Published: 01 September 1951
... of scholars (or George Bernard Shaw) is the deplorable state of English orthography; Hall’s remedy for its condition (like that of Shaw) is about as impractical as the current system itself, although his initial emphasis on phonemic spelling seems eminently laudable. It is indicative of his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 257–260.
Published: 01 June 1947
... this is an oversight, or else the writer must be of the opinion that [ts] is a unit phoneme and [pf] is a consonant cluster. Some phonemicists treat both [ts] and [pf] as unit phonemes, and others treat both as clusters, but certainly both must be treated alike. One of the strong points of this dictionary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 377–380.
Published: 01 September 1951
...) is the deplorable state of English orthography; Hall’s remedy for its condition (like that of Shaw) is about as impractical as the current system itself, although his initial emphasis on phonemic spelling seems eminently laudable. It is indicative of his consistent desire for scientific method. In fact...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2023) 84 (1): 53–70.
Published: 01 March 2023
..., for the individual phoneme or letter as well as the larger semantic import” (xii). This experiment, which claims to depart both from merely “close” reading and from “art for art’s sake” by embracing “history, geography, and culture,” offers a “possible methodology” but also a defense of poetry, a way of showing what...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (4): 413–431.
Published: 01 December 1943
... lonely town of Kasan, was teaching, as early as 1868, that the sounds as sense-data are not a psychological reality to the community: in the minds of a speaking group there is a psychological correspondent of the actual sound; this he called a “phoneme.” To give a practical example: whenever...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 417–418.
Published: 01 December 1952
... Language, which embodies the spirit of 1876 and ignores seventy-five years of subsequent research in linguistics. In a brief attempt to modernize his thinking, Mr. Bithell sums up the concept of the phoneme (pp. 42-45) in the manner of the London school and character- istically fails to show...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 313–314.
Published: 01 September 1963
... very little, since the nearest phoneme in the recipient language may be expected to have replaced a foreign [v] had such existed. Some minor quibbles may now be registered. OE dwellan did mean ‘to lead astray’ (p. 213), but it often meant ‘to hinder, delay.’ The following is am...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 416–417.
Published: 01 December 1952
..., which embodies the spirit of 1876 and ignores seventy-five years of subsequent research in linguistics. In a brief attempt to modernize his thinking, Mr. Bithell sums up the concept of the phoneme (pp. 42-45) in the manner of the London school and character- istically fails to show...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (1): 124–125.
Published: 01 March 1950
...“ as in pas, which has acquired the vowel in patte, he still prescribes that we distinguish en, an, from on, as in the cultured tradition. Further, positional variation in /e/ and (open in closed syllables, close in open syllables) is duly noted, but the /o/ phoneme, which belongs with them (cor...