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peacock

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (4): 513–534.
Published: 01 December 1990
... OF (NOT) KEEPING IN STEP READING THE CONSUMER MOBOCRACY OF POE’S “THE DEVIL IN THE BELFRY” AGAINST PEACOCK By KATRINA E. BACHINGER Everybody agrees and nobody agrees on what is attacked when the dashing little dandy in Edgar Allan Poe’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1971) 32 (2): 226–229.
Published: 01 June 1971
... Pen ns y lvu n iu S t a t e U n iversi t y Peacock: His Circle and His Age. By HOWARD~IIILS. Cambridge: At the University Press, 1969. xv -t 257 pp. $9.50. The nature of Thomas Love Peacock’s relationship to English romantic thought has always been a puzzle to scholars...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 287–295.
Published: 01 June 1942
... Peacock’s uncompleted narrative poem AhrirnaneThe extent and nature of this debt have not, I believe, 50 far been suspected although Peacock’s editor, Mr. H. F. B. Brett- Smith, notes a resemblance in “general conception” between an outline of the poem which Peacock left and The Revolt of Islam...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 356–362.
Published: 01 December 1952
... with Macaulay’s in almost every detail and is more elaborately presented was available when the Essay on Milton was written, and it is more than likely that Macaulay drew his theory almost in toto from this source. This was Thomas Love Peacock’s essay Four Ages of Poetry, published in the first...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1971) 32 (2): 219–223.
Published: 01 June 1971
... otherwise: what is now appraised as surface technique--good, bad, or mid- dling-may rather be the clue to an entire deep structure of the genre. KICHARDI,. FRAUl’SCI11 Pen ns y lvu n iu S t a t e U n iversi t y Peacock: His Circle and His Age...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (3): 299–321.
Published: 01 September 1997
... and enlightenment, that the figure of the sun supported in the poems by Seward and Robinson. Although there is no evidence that Shelley read Davy’s 1799 essay, he encountered similar ideas through other reading and through friends. In 18 12 he met Thomas Love Peacock; the two remained cor...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 317–319.
Published: 01 September 1979
... and Lon- don: Johns Hopkins University Press. 1979. sv + 268 pp. $16.00. Readers of Carl Dawson’s other full-lerlgth stlldy (His Fine Wit: A Stull? Thomas Love Peacock) will experience an uneasy feeling of dijci ZIU while reading VicfonanNoon. Dissimilar as they are in subject...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 83–86.
Published: 01 March 1972
... three long chapters to the study of Wordsworth, Byron, and Shelley, and one chapter to the rest of the romantic writers: Cole- ridge, Blake, Burns, Peacock, Landor, Moore, Campbell, Scott, Lamb, hats, and Hood. Essentially, Woodring offers us conclusions. While he has clearly clone his homework...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (3): 305–308.
Published: 01 September 1984
... perspective on history matches that of the author of his most convincing example, The White Peacock. Daleski chose to deal with Law- rence’s first novel because it best represents the crippling and self-castigat- ing dichotomy of flesh and spirit, a narrator off to the side watching his elders...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 205–208.
Published: 01 June 1943
... part, That neither Phoebus beams could through them throng Nor Aeolus sharp blast could worke them any wrong. Shelley’s review of Peacock‘s Rhododaphne leaves no doubt of his acquaintance with Spenser’s Bower of Bliss. “The last canto [of Peacocks poem] relates...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (1): 33–42.
Published: 01 March 1958
... syncopation within these units. The following example will illustrate the point: She was a gordian shape of dazzling hue, Vermilion-spotted, golden, green, and blue ; Striped like a zebra, freckled like a pard, Eyed like a peacock, and all...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 297–302.
Published: 01 September 1946
... manuscript has not been traced, the editor might have improved his incomplete texts by reference to readily available auction catalogues. Thus, Letter 151 is drawn wholly from Peacock’s Memoirs of Shelley, where it is not complete. The record of the sale of the letter at Sotheby’s has a comment...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 312–317.
Published: 01 September 1979
... Vicloriatr Nooti: Englisli Literature in. 1850. By CAKLDAWSON. Baltimore and Lon- don: Johns Hopkins University Press. 1979. sv + 268 pp. $16.00. Readers of Carl Dawson’s other full-lerlgth stlldy (His Fine Wit: A Stull? Thomas Love Peacock) will experience an uneasy feeling of dijci ZIU...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 479–504.
Published: 01 December 2006
... the Enlightenment to the Nineteenth Century as the Victorian period, in the process eliding Romanticism as a distinct formation. It is worth noting what is at issue here in the term Romanticism. For the argument between Thomas Love Peacock, whose Four Ages of Poetry derives from Scottish Enlightenment...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (4): 609–610.
Published: 01 December 1941
... of Tasso: Non merita nome di creatore, se non Iddio ed il Poeta.”l None of the various editors gives the source of this quotation; they are content merely to translate it or to point out that Shelley had used it, in a slightly different form, in a letter to Peacock written from Bagni di...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (4): 521–526.
Published: 01 December 1970
.... $7.50. Melacla, Ivan. The Captain of lndustiy in English Fiction, 1821-1871. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1970. xii + 224 lip. $10.00. Mills, Howard (editor). Thomas Love Peacock: “ibiernoirs of Shelley” an.d Other Essays and lleviezus. New York: New York University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 60–76.
Published: 01 March 1967
... comprise the two basic Gestalten. These two fields, rvi th their subsidiary forms, mingle and disengage; the night wunds of the wind and the peacocks, through synesthcsia, also be<oiiie part ot the movement and color. All impres,ions, as they posse\s the poet, ale “whole.” The hemlocks...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (4): 518–520.
Published: 01 December 1950
... : Geoffrey Cumberlege, Oxford University Press, 1950. Pp. v + 52. $1.00. Peacock, Markham L., Jr. The Critical Opinions of William Wordsworth. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1950. Pp. xxvi + 469. $6.00. Raysor, Thomas M. (editor). The English Romantic Poets: A Review of Research. New...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 81–83.
Published: 01 March 1972
... indirections of the poetry under scrutiny here. The compression is in tense. Woodring devotes three long chapters to the study of Wordsworth, Byron, and Shelley, and one chapter to the rest of the romantic writers: Cole- ridge, Blake, Burns, Peacock, Landor, Moore, Campbell, Scott, Lamb, hats...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 75–77.
Published: 01 March 1972
..., after all, to which Donne and Jonson belonged, or half-belonged. Then, too, Crashaw may not look quite so much like a hoopoe if he is placecl beside those English peacocks Giles and Phineas Fletcher, to say nothing of his friend Benlowes; Henlowes and Cleveland (Summers notes the second poet...