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pandarus

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1980) 41 (2): 115–130.
Published: 01 June 1980
...By JOHN M. FYLER Copyright © 1980 by Duke University Press 1980 THE FABRICATIONS OF PANDARUS By JOHN M. FYLER One of the most powerful and disturbing qualities of Troilur and Cri- seyde is its insistence that we remain uneasy about things in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 37–40.
Published: 01 March 1961
... short-time plan, appears to span a period from May 3 to May 6, and its dramatic purpose centers upon the machinations of Pandarus. Another set of references, the long-time plan, seems to cover an indeterminate period, and its function appears to be one of logic; that is, it centers on...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1954) 15 (4): 312–320.
Published: 01 December 1954
.... The picture of her and her maidens in the early stanzas of Book I1 shows an urbane and serene household; in harmonious leisure they listen to the reading of the tale of Thebes; when Pandarus enters, Criseyde welcomes him with graciousness and wit. During her interview with Ector, although...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1975) 36 (2): 115–132.
Published: 01 June 1975
... love” (484-90). By the time Pandarus gets to him, he is once more pleading with an absent Criseyde to save him from death (535-36), even though appar- ently the Greeks still “as the deth him dredde” (483). Pandarus knows that underneath his passivity is battle-pride: “Allas...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 297–308.
Published: 01 December 1962
... wownde”; on the other hand, Troilus is smitten by Cupid, succumbs to Fortune, and is then led by Pandarus to disclose the cause of his torment and sorrow, to “unwre his wownde.” Both Troilus and Boethius, therefore, are afflicted by the same illness, react in similar ways, and turn to the aid of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 140.
Published: 01 March 1941
... study of Chaucer’s use of courtly love in the characterization of Pandarus, Criseyde, Diomede, and Troilus. In his discussions, he presents fully the opinions of modern scholars and shows conclusively that Chaucer, using Boc- caccio’s story, altered and increased the courtly love elements...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1968) 29 (2): 131–144.
Published: 01 June 1968
...; throughout Books I1 and 111, he never really knows what he is doing or what is happening to him; and when disaster comes in Book IV, he is little more than pitiful. The only time he seems to act in a manner we would call admirable is when he refuses to accede to Pandarus’ plan to forget Criseyde and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1989) 50 (3): 209–226.
Published: 01 September 1989
... Pandarus. The Trojans in many ways resemble the English aristocracy, or at least that part of it closely associated with the court. Part of the national mythol- ogy was that ancient Britain had been civilized by a Trojan, Brutus, and many noble families, particularly those with Welsh ancestry...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1992) 53 (1): 23–40.
Published: 01 March 1992
... characterization. Lydgate does use Chaucer’s name for Guido’s Briseida, but the name Pandarus appears in the narrative, as it does in the Histwia, as that of a king who came to fight on the Trojan side (2.7626). The role of Pandarus in the love affair is men- tioned only in passing during the summary of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1985) 46 (3): 329–332.
Published: 01 September 1985
... means, concentrates around the person and bed of Criseyde. As the repeated violations of the church lead to its corruption and finally the Babylonian captivity of the Avignon papacy, so the equivalent images in the Troilus trace the effects of the encroachments of Pandarus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1985) 46 (4): 450–452.
Published: 01 December 1985
... in love with Troilus from the start and makes the first overtures; she is determined not to go to the Greek camp until she is commanded to go by Pandarus and Troilus. Her going is required to fulfill the cliche of her falsity and Troilus’s constancy. But this persuasive reading, like that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1990) 51 (1): 90–96.
Published: 01 March 1990
...); furthermore, that he chooses and shapes his characters, his narrators, his forms and his sources in order to explore these consequences. Chapter One, “Reading Like a Man: The Critics, the Narrator, Troilus, and Pandarus,” offers a feminist reading of the decidedly masculinist Troilus and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 151–155.
Published: 01 March 1941
... excellent illustration of the importance of studying sources and influences for a fuller appreciation of a work of art. The greater part of the chapter devoted to Troilus and Cm’- seyde is made up of quotation, paraphrase, and commentary on the characters of Criseyde, Troilus, and Pandarus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1963) 24 (1): 61–65.
Published: 01 March 1963
... in its celestial ring, and also provides a standard sexual figure. The lost ruby itself probably represents sexual passion. This last quoted line strongly echoes a passage in which Pandarus suggests by innuendo to Criseyde that she will not exactly satisfy Troilus’ desire and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1945) 6 (3): 271–284.
Published: 01 September 1945
... of Robert Henryson (Edinburgh, 1933), p. xxxi. (Wood’s text is used here.) 3 See the Testament, lines 40 ff. 4 Pandarus is not referred to by Henryson. Since the sequel takes up the story long after Pandarus has played his part in bringing the two lovers together, and since the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1985) 46 (2): 115–128.
Published: 01 June 1985
... York: Dutton, 19721, pp. 103-4), su gests that Criseyde at least is capable of such double- entendre, despite syntax. Speaking of Troilus’s love, Pandarus argues: “Ther were nevere two so we1 ymet, / Whan ye ben his a1 hool, as he is youre.” Criseyde answers with what appears to be some...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1953) 14 (4): 335–340.
Published: 01 December 1953
...’ last act is to cast out Pandarus. Thus Cressida’s faithlessness and the ignoble death of Hector, the man who sacrificed love and life to honor, help make Troilus the mature soldier destined to succeed Hector. We can now see why Shakespeare chose to give us a Hector so uniform and so...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1944) 5 (4): 439–447.
Published: 01 December 1944
... Pandarus, “right in my litel closet yonder. y’28 Both poets use very effectively the contrast of the warm comfort within and the storm without. A great deal of the strength of Keats’s scene comes from this contrast, which is not present in the Filocolo. Stanzas 35, 36...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1968) 29 (4): 467–475.
Published: 01 December 1968
... as a gentleman in the circle of Mirabell. Although Vickers calls Troilus and Cressidu a tragicomedy, he apparently ac- cepts the views of Oscar J. Campbell and Alice Walker on the play, and he attempts to use what he calls “the decadent prose” of Troilus, as well as that of Pandarus and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1984) 45 (4): 395–403.
Published: 01 December 1984
... deserves mention: on p. 85, Ganim refers to Pandarus as “one not in love,” whereas his desper- ate love, so close to a parody of Troilus’s, constantly complicates our response to the unfolding love affair in Book 2. 400 MIDDLE ENGLISH NARRATIVE POEMS In her...