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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1980) 41 (1): 90–93.
Published: 01 March 1980
... Chaucer and Ovid. By JOHN M. FYLER.New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1979. x + 206 pp. $14.50. John Fyler does not attempt to reassess or add to the work done in E. F. Shannon’s Chaucer and the Roman Poets (1929) and Richard L. Hoffman’s O-cd and the “Canterbury Tales” (1967...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1949) 10 (1): 113–115.
Published: 01 March 1949
...-century life from following his activities. DOUGLASBUSH Harvard University Milton and the Renaissance Ovid. By DAVISP. HARDING.Urbana: University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, Volume XXX, No. 4, 1946. Pp. 105. $1.50...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2007) 68 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 2007
... Beauty: Ovid and the Argument of Keats’s “Ode on a Grecian Urn” Arnd Bohm hat happens to people when their gods die, when their belief and Wfaith are dismissed as mere superstitions? A poignant account from recent times is found in Michelle Z. Rosaldo’s report about her experiences...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1951) 12 (1): 13–19.
Published: 01 March 1951
...Eugene M. Waith Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 THE POET’S MORALS IN JONSON’S POETASTER By EUGENEM. WAITH The parting of Ovid and Julia in Jonson’s Poetaster is a perplexing scene. The poet has been banished by Caesar for his impious behavior...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2006) 67 (1): 103–128.
Published: 01 March 2006
... as the politics of sympathy, absolutist jests and games, what Shakespeare's heroines want, and the political status of Ovid in the early modern period. She is also coeditor of the Norton Anthology of World Literature . Her essay “Royal Jokes and Sovereign Mystery in Castiglione and Marguerite de...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1949) 10 (1): 115–116.
Published: 01 March 1949
... “man,” the erect animal, only emphasizes the poverty of the acknowledgment of the Platonic ele- ment in both Ovid and Milton. When we come to Paradise Regained and Samson, the question at the end of Mr. Harding’s opening chapter is answered with a round affirmative. In neither poem can he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1949) 10 (1): 112–113.
Published: 01 March 1949
.... DOUGLASBUSH Harvard University Milton and the Renaissance Ovid. By DAVISP. HARDING.Urbana: University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, Volume XXX, No. 4, 1946. Pp. 105. $1.50. This is a valuable, readable, and admirably planned thesis. The opening chapter on...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1945) 6 (1): 101–102.
Published: 01 March 1945
... which once included Oenone and Paris might have been made by the owner of the so-called “Burton volume,” a similar collection of five poems published in octavo. Though he is Ovid’s debtor, “T. H.” does not imitate Ovid’s sophistication, nor does he indulge in those touches of morbid...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1983) 44 (3): 311–313.
Published: 01 September 1983
... focus is on a few major pieces of narrative fiction by a handful of prominent poets- chiefly Ovid, Boccaccio, Chaucer. He argues that each of these writers, in different ways, created characters who were more than the typical figures called for in classical rhetorical treatises. To...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1952) 13 (1): 121–123.
Published: 01 March 1952
... modern French poet to adopt a psychology of love having close affinities with one to be found in Ovid. One wonders whether it is not at the same time an attempt to alter and increase Ovid’s stature by assimilating certain moments in his work to certain products of Racine’s tragic genius. In...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1946) 7 (2): 175–178.
Published: 01 June 1946
... owe its origin to Lyte’s account of the flower which was identified with the equally famous youth, Hyacinthu Following his original, Lyte identifies the flower “of Ovide called Hyacinthus” as the “red purple Lilly.”6 He describes the three kinds -“small purple,” “greater red...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1981) 42 (2): 184–191.
Published: 01 June 1981
...). Much is new here too: the dazzling ninth chapter on the last books of Paradise Lost (in the 1667 version, Book 10) in contrast to the ending of Camoens’s Lusiads, and most of Part 111 devoted to figurations of Ovid and set forth in three chapters of sustained brilliance: “The Anti-heroic Epic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1952) 13 (1): 81–89.
Published: 01 March 1952
... which we recognize both a pagan and a patristic tradition. The themes of the pagan tradition appear as expressed by Ovid and Seneca. Some of Ovid’s notions are quoted directly from him, in the Marot translation, others as quoted by Seneca and woven into his thought. They run as follows...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1980) 41 (1): 88–90.
Published: 01 March 1980
... acknowledging the author’s debt to others. It is one of the indispensable critical works of our time. NORMANKAHKIN University of Calzfornia, Berkeley Chaucer and Ovid. By JOHN M. FYLER.New Haven and London: Yale University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1985) 46 (4): 459–461.
Published: 01 December 1985
... by it (pp. 35, 215). In Poetaster, Jonson moves into an Oedipal phase, shifting authority to the repressively parental Caesar, whose banish- ment of Ovid violates our sympathy for the poet-hero, while Ovid’s satiric counterpart, Horace, though vindicated, “seems tired and nervous, trap...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1945) 6 (1): 102–104.
Published: 01 March 1945
... eight quarto texts which once included Oenone and Paris might have been made by the owner of the so-called “Burton volume,” a similar collection of five poems published in octavo. Though he is Ovid’s debtor, “T. H.” does not imitate Ovid’s sophistication, nor does he indulge in those touches...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 140.
Published: 01 March 1941
.... His translations of foreign languages and of Chaucer are correct and skillfully phrased. He outlines the influence of Ovid, The Troubadours, ChrCtien de Troyes, Andreas Capellanus, Italy and I1 duke stil nuovo before discussing I1 Filo- strato. He lays a solid foundation for the study of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1980) 41 (1): 93–96.
Published: 01 March 1980
...Ilona Bell Kiefer Lewalski Barbara. Princeton: Pricenton University Press, 1979. xiv + 536 pp. $27.50. Copyright © 1980 by Duke University Press 1980 ILONA BELL 93 Dante chooses Vergil to be his guide, he leaves Ovid to Chaucer by...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1950) 11 (2): 248.
Published: 01 June 1950
..., essentially unchanged. It was a program of teaching based upon the procedures and purposes of the ancient Roman schools which had educated Cicero and Ovid, and it was still designed to train a picked class of youths in grammar, logic, and rhetoric, which is to say, in the learned languages...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 379–380.
Published: 01 September 1946
... Farmer. The Percy Letters, general editors, David Nicol Smith and Cleanth Brooks. Louisiana State University Press, 1946. Pp. xviii + 218. $3.50. Harding, Davis P. Milton and the Renaissance Ovid. Urbana: University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, Volume XXX, 1946. Pp. 105...