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oroonoko

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 401–405.
Published: 01 September 1942
...Wylie Sypher Copyright © 1942 by Duke University Press 1942 A NOTE ON THE REALISM OF MRS. BEHN’S OROONOKO By WYLIESYPHER The “realism” of Mrs. Behn’s Oroonoko is a vexed question.’ Yet no matter what Mrs. Behn owes to French...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 286–291.
Published: 01 September 1951
...Edward D. Seeber Copyright © 1951 by Duke University Press 1951 OROONOKO AND CRUSOE’S MAN FRIDAY By EDWARDD. SEEBER Some years ago, Professor Arthur W. Secord published a method- ical investigation of the sources of Robinson Crusoe,l with abundant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (3): 341–367.
Published: 01 September 2011
... background and foreground and between text and New World context, Aphra Behn's Oroonoko: A Royal Slave exploits these tensions between the economic and political domains to reveal the market not only as an ethical framework for political freedom but also as a tyrant ruling over those it dispossesses. Taken...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (2): 189–203.
Published: 01 June 1946
... reaching her height in The Fair Jilt and Oroonoko, a slump was all too natural. I1 Despite her ventures in heroic romance, hlrs. Behn shows, from 1683 when she wrote her first novel, a growing interest in gaining a semblance of reality in and through setting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 269–272.
Published: 01 June 2009
... texts — Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1689), Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative (1789), and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter (1850) — with far less obvious choices, including Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina (1725), Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa (1748), and George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda (1876...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 272–274.
Published: 01 June 2009
.... Doyle brings together the predictable texts — Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1689), Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative (1789), and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter (1850) — with far less obvious choices, including Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina (1725), Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa (1748), and George...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 275–278.
Published: 01 June 2009
... texts — Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1689), Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative (1789), and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter (1850) — with far less obvious choices, including Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina (1725), Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa (1748), and George Eliot’s Daniel Deronda (1876...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 278–282.
Published: 01 June 2009
.... Doyle brings together the predictable texts — Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1689), Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative (1789), and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter (1850) — with far less obvious choices, including Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina (1725), Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa (1748), and George...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 282–286.
Published: 01 June 2009
..., respectively. The sweeping temporal and geographic scope of Freedom’s Empire is at once its strength and its weakness. Doyle brings together the predictable texts — Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1689), Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative (1789), and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter (1850...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (2): 287–290.
Published: 01 June 2009
.... Doyle brings together the predictable texts — Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko (1689), Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative (1789), and Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Scarlet Letter (1850) — with far less obvious choices, including Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina (1725), Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa (1748), and George...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 485–486.
Published: 01 September 1942
...- lication of Aphra Behn’s novelette, Oroonoko, in 1688, until the early nineteenth century, this noble savage stalked through English literature ; always he was endowed with traits and characteristics so superior to other mortals that the language scarcely sufficed to express his virtues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2024) 85 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2024
...—how the “stain of slavery, going forward from early modern England, [could] only be inscribed on the bodies of black persons” (198). In this regard it might have been helpful for Chakravarty to consider contemporaneous sources that draw on both traditions (such as Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko ) rather...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 633–643.
Published: 01 December 1996
...”in her discussion of Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko obscures essential distinctions in the meaning of slavery and sovereignty in Africa and Surinam. Not taking into account the effects of class on gender makes it impossible to explain why upper-class women did not sign (or even publish) their literary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 192–195.
Published: 01 June 1987
... Charlotte Welldon in Oroonoko (p. 164). An extremely strained critical reading of a short simile from Astraea Redzuc supports the conclusion that Dryden at once repudiates the primitive and betrays a fascination with it (p. 8), but there is no discus- sion of Dryden’s extensive and explicit concern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 527–530.
Published: 01 December 2006
... Cary, and Aphra Behn. The studies set particular works — La cité des dames, story 67 from the Heptaméron, The Tragedy of Miriam, Oroonoko, and The Widow Ranter — against the interrelated narratives of imperialist nation building, linguistic standardization, and the fortunes of the “clerkly” class...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 531–533.
Published: 01 December 2006
... the Heptaméron, The Tragedy of Miriam, Oroonoko, and The Widow Ranter — against the interrelated narratives of imperialist nation building, linguistic standardization, and the fortunes of the “clerkly” class. The dis- cussion is layered and sophisticated and (deliberately) resists easy summary. It is both...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 534–536.
Published: 01 December 2006
... pp. The second half of Margaret W. Ferguson’s book consists of case studies of four women writers: Christine de Pizan, Marguerite de Navarre, Elizabeth Cary, and Aphra Behn. The studies set particular works — La cité des dames, story 67 from the Heptaméron, The Tragedy of Miriam, Oroonoko...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 536–543.
Published: 01 December 2006
... particular works — La cité des dames, story 67 from the Heptaméron, The Tragedy of Miriam, Oroonoko, and The Widow Ranter — against the interrelated narratives of imperialist nation building, linguistic standardization, and the fortunes of the “clerkly” class. The dis- cussion is layered...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 544–546.
Published: 01 December 2006
... — La cité des dames, story 67 from the Heptaméron, The Tragedy of Miriam, Oroonoko, and The Widow Ranter — against the interrelated narratives of imperialist nation building, linguistic standardization, and the fortunes of the “clerkly” class. The dis- cussion is layered and sophisticated...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (4): 547–549.
Published: 01 December 2006
..., The Tragedy of Miriam, Oroonoko, and The Widow Ranter — against the interrelated narratives of imperialist nation building, linguistic standardization, and the fortunes of the “clerkly” class. The dis- cussion is layered and sophisticated and (deliberately) resists easy summary. It is both dense...