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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (3): 247–257.
Published: 01 September 1955
...Ants Oras Copyright © 1955 by Duke University Press 1955 THE MULTITUDINOUS ORB SOME MILTONIC ELEMENTS IN SHELLEY By ANTSORAS In the final, climactic act of Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, imme- diately before the paean-like...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (4): 355–369.
Published: 01 December 1972
...,” will try to “save appeerances” (8.80, 82); but they will fall into absurdities rather than simplifications, for they will gird the Sphear With Centric and Eccentric scribl’d ore, Cycle and Epicycle, Orb in Orb...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 131–148.
Published: 01 June 1952
... Philosopher, in his physical disputation with Galileus. de phaenomenis in orbe Lunae, cap. 9, will admit” (4th ed. [ 16321, p. 252 ; Bell, 11, 58). Burton thus shows continuing interest in the matter, though his added source is a book almost thirty years old by this time. In 1632 or later he got...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 449–452.
Published: 01 December 1944
...” (line 614), and her feet may well be described as “hovering” (line 624). The phrase “orbed brow” (line 616) may be derived from either of the definitely named portraits of Diana cited, for in both the crescent representing the moon’s orb appears on her forehead. Furthermore, Spence, in his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (1): 21–53.
Published: 01 March 1975
... as needful to the Sun of the intellectual heavens as the Sun to the shadows; and though opposite to it. . . their existence was the very consummation of its perfection .” The relationship between the sexes in Paradise Lost is a reflection of that between sun and moon, two great orbs...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (3): 257–271.
Published: 01 September 1974
... to knowl- edge which Cain thirsts for so desperately. Cain-after his apostrophe -identifies them with good: “Within those glorious orbs . . . / I11 cannot come: they are too beautiful” (V, 248). Even in Don Juan in the midst of the most flippant or realistic pas- sages (as in the shipwreck...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 287–295.
Published: 01 June 1942
... and he sees “shadowy orb,” which grows a dark “spot” “stained with larger and larger before his eyes. shadow” emerging out of a (I. iii.) “chasm of light,” which grows larger and larger. (I. ii, iv, vi, vii...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1987) 48 (2): 145–161.
Published: 01 June 1987
... of biblical apocalypse. His images drawn from biology, geology, and astronomy suggest a vast, temporal trajectory: the “huge first Nothing” (1 153), the “Monstrous sauroids” (1 167), “the nebula” that “cohered to an orb,” “the long slow strata piled” upon it (1 164-65), all having progressed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 79–80.
Published: 01 March 1956
... than to translate literally, but their translations differ from Dasent’s. For example, the phrase en bat mlcn Jd Mar reymst, which Dasent renders “But that will be put to the proof by and by,” they translate as “but we shall see what we shall see.” Or margir kjdsa eigi orb ci sik, which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 80–81.
Published: 01 March 1956
... as “but we shall see what we shall see.” Or margir kjdsa eigi orb ci sik, which in Dasent’s version was “Listeners do not often hear good of themselves,” is in the new translation, “You can’t prevent people from talking ill about you.” The treatment of names, ever a knotty problem, has been...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (2): 162–173.
Published: 01 June 1966
... a kind of demonstration in orb or circle, one part illuminating another, and therefore satisfy” (VI, 291-92). The image characterized not only the systems which were to become Idols of the Theater, but also their parts, such as the old logic by “congruity, which is that which Aristotle...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (3): 235–252.
Published: 01 September 1953
... Chambers begins the poem: Knight of the Polar Star! by Fortune plac’d To shine the Cynosure of British taste; Whose orb collects, in one refulgent view, The scatter’d glories of Chinese Virth; And spread their lustre in so broad a blaze...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 267–285.
Published: 01 September 1951
... complex geo- graphical or astronomical material. He spake; and Uriel to the sun return’d,21 . . . on that bright beam, whose poifit now rais’d Bore him slope domward to the Sun now fall’n Beneath the Azores; whither the prime Orb...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 229–269.
Published: 01 September 2010
...  A similar sequence appears in Milton’s sonnet to Cyriack Skinner on his blind- ness: “Nor to their idle orbs doth sight appear / Of sun or moon or stars throughout the year, / Or man or woman.” 238 MLQ September 2010 Concitaque arcano fervent mihi...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 435–447.
Published: 01 December 1947
...: Did that glorious Orb Of embodied Light Direct all his Beams to me, I could not see him So perfectly as now, If uniting into one they scorch’d me not, A night of darkness...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 472–475.
Published: 01 September 1942
... evidence, however, seems to me to argue against his phonemic analysis of words like mars and orb in “r-less” speech. (See Heffner, Ant. Sp., XV, 77.) In such speech is there no phonemic difference in mars, mu’s-granted that the vowels are qualitatively the same? Copyright © 1942 by Duke...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 45–50.
Published: 01 March 1942
... The internal surface on each glassy orb Repells their forward passage into air ; That thence direct they seek the radiant goal From which their course began; and, as they strike, In different lines the gazer’s obvious eye, Assume a different lustre, through...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (3): 259–263.
Published: 01 September 1952
...; And Atlas, type of human nature, throw The ponderous orb of death and slavery From his bent form, that crouched beneath its woe ;- And Earth to Heaven’s embrace espoused and queenly go. (Lyric of the Golden Age, p. 174) Apparent discrepancies were...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1982) 43 (3): 203–227.
Published: 01 September 1982
... earth ioin’d to the heauen hie” (8.106). From a purely temporal perspec- tive, the river triumphs over the city, and only “T’ber hastning to his fall / Remaines of all” (3.39-40). As “The pray of time, which all 24 Isidore observes, “Vrbs vocata ab orbe, quod antiquae civitates...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (1): 60–81.
Published: 01 March 1953
... Leaves of Me.” (10) That the divine poet-prophet-lover is like the sun and like the world. “Thou Orb Aloft Full-Dazzling” ; “Earth, My Likeness.” (11) That the poet is the soul. “Encircling all, vast-darting up and wide, the American Soul, with equal hemispheres, one Love...