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ophelia

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2013) 74 (4): 441–463.
Published: 01 December 2013
... reconciliation of father and daughter, as, also tragically, does the final action between Gertrude and Hamlet when she wipes his forehead, fulfilling his promise that “when you are desirous to be blessed, / I’ll blessing beg of you.” The blessing of marriage between Hamlet and Ophelia exposes another abruption...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 201–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
... with the influence of empowered Ophelias who illustrate a less solipsistic version of melancholy. Thus both authors criticize the inertia that gripped their male counterparts directly after the French Revolution. Staël's novel ultimately follows a tragic pattern, while Owenson's gestures toward the possibility...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (2): 115–136.
Published: 01 June 1981
...- curs, it returns to being the plausible utterance of a dramatic character. That scene begins with the entrance of Claudius, Gertrude, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, and an unspecified number of “Lords.” In response to Claudius’s opening question, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 1997
... to try to deter- mine what is bothering Hamlet, Claudius and Polonius plan to eaves- drop on an encounter between Hamlet and Ophelia. Claudius has summoned Hamlet to this place: “We have closely sent for Hamlet hither” (3.1.29).Polonius and Claudius go into hiding but remain within earshot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (4): 323–332.
Published: 01 December 1952
...-precisely the emotional lack which he will later find in himself. I, iii. The Polonius-Laertes sub-plot is introduced; the theme, how- ever, continues on a secondary level. Ophelia is warned of Hamlet’s impulsive ardor, “a toy in blood, / A violet in the youth of primy nature, / Forward...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 163–170.
Published: 01 March 2009
... responds, “Let us haste to hear it,” but he is able neither to listen nor really to reflect on what we have seen (in the words of Ophelia, “Oh woe is me / T’have seen what I have seen, see what I see Failing even to pay attention to the details of the tragedy that has just come to a close, he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 432–447.
Published: 01 December 1953
... the contradictory flagellation of duty-but, if he fixes his inner gaze upon an image of himself which he preserves intact, as that of Ophelia who has never drowned herself, he is again in possession of his faculties. A pure jewel kept intact amid disaster. The plume, the disaster, the “pure jewel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 331–362.
Published: 01 December 1978
... with their concrete universality, or lack of it. ?‘he play presents us with one Ophelia, one Gertrude, one Laertes, one Polonius, one Horatio, one Osric, and so on. That these characters require only a forename suggests their singularity-though not their individuality , for they certainly have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (3): 269–288.
Published: 01 September 2018
... English Novels . Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press . Miller J. Hillis . 1991 . “ The Critic as Host .” In Theory Now and Then , 143 – 70 . Durham, NC : Duke University Press . Showalter Elaine . 1985 . “ Representing Ophelia: Women, Madness, and the Responsibilities...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 March 1976
... memory, deny all that he has been and is, and become the simple in- strument of another power’s purpose. The scene which follows suggests that Hamlet makes at least an initial attempt, for Ophelia describes what may be called a “hail and farewell”: Hamlet’s leave-taking from the one dearest...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 135–154.
Published: 01 June 1979
... the closet scene. In the company of Ro- sencrantz and Guildenstern, Hamlet then watches Fortinbras’ army cross the stage. Immediately thereafter we see Horatio, Gertrude, and Claudius” observing, but doing nothing about, the mad Ophelia. Ham- let returns from the voyage to watch Ophelia’s funeral...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 223–227.
Published: 01 September 1960
...” but is more like Hamlet’s spontaneous leap into Ophelia’s grave. It is worth remembering, too, with Bowers (1940), that King Leur was written when the older revenge-drama was evolving into a form more suited to the artificial and sensational tastes of the Jacobean age. The earlier plays...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (4): 505–529.
Published: 01 December 2004
... his first Shake- spearean performance in 1827. The love-struck composer filtered his admiration for the English playwright through an infatuation with Ophelia, performed by Harriet Smithson. For an entire generation of Romantics, from François Guizot to George Sand to Eugène Delacroix...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (4): 323–335.
Published: 01 December 1977
... playing king with all the formal trappings, Othello the perfect commander, Cleo- patra the dramatic queen, and Macbeth the loyal warrior. Hamlet the prince is slightly different, since his breakdown is well under way when the play opens, and his iconic perfection is presented only in Ophelia’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (3): 293–294.
Published: 01 September 1959
... 293 Heine’s La A4ouche (which the Penguin Book prints without identification). But it is disturbing to have to do with occasional splinters and excerpts from dramas (Heath drops the second half of Heym’s Ophelia, Penguin prints only Part I1 of Brentano’s Nuchkliinge Beethoverarcher...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 415–417.
Published: 01 September 2008
... defined by unfamiliar theological, icono­ graphic, and imperial coordinates. The phrase “Hamlet without Hamlet” calls us to strip away our preconceptions of the hero to confront the differ- ence between his epoch and ours. By paying more attention to characters such as Laertes, Fortinbras, Ophelia...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 418–420.
Published: 01 September 2008
... to characters such as Laertes, Fortinbras, Ophelia, and the gravediggers, we can reevalu- ate and reencounter Hamlet himself in a more plotted, more active, more syntactic scene than the one inhabited by the deracinated Romantic Hamlet, whose subjective autonomy freed him to wander the uncharted realms...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 421–423.
Published: 01 September 2008
... defined by unfamiliar theological, icono­ graphic, and imperial coordinates. The phrase “Hamlet without Hamlet” calls us to strip away our preconceptions of the hero to confront the differ- ence between his epoch and ours. By paying more attention to characters such as Laertes, Fortinbras, Ophelia...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 423–426.
Published: 01 September 2008
...” calls us to strip away our preconceptions of the hero to confront the differ- ence between his epoch and ours. By paying more attention to characters such as Laertes, Fortinbras, Ophelia, and the gravediggers, we can reevalu- ate and reencounter Hamlet himself in a more plotted, more active, more...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (3): 426–431.
Published: 01 September 2008
...” calls us to strip away our preconceptions of the hero to confront the differ- ence between his epoch and ours. By paying more attention to characters such as Laertes, Fortinbras, Ophelia, and the gravediggers, we can reevalu- ate and reencounter Hamlet himself in a more plotted, more active, more...