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odysseus

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 363–385.
Published: 01 December 1978
...DAVID EGGENSCHWILER Copyright © 1978 by Duke University Press 1978 “DIE VERWANDLUNG,” FREUD, AND THE CHAINS OF ODYSSEUS By DAVIDEGGENSCHWILER For nearly half a century, since Hellmuth Kaiser’s 1931 essay in Ima...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (2): 107–127.
Published: 01 June 2010
... a servant of the monarchy, Du Bellay contests monarchical authority and Ronsardian poetics through a particular reading of Homer: his self-portrayal contrasts with prudent Odysseus, whom Du Bellay's teachers had proposed as a model to the French king and whom the poet claimed ironically to surpass...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 427–444.
Published: 01 September 1942
..., with the as- sistance of Joyce, points out a host of correspondences. I have dis- covered many others, and a considerable number of discrepancies: First, then, let us recall the structure of the -Homeric model. The Odyssey is divided into three parts, the Telemuchk, the Ad- ventures of Odysseus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 341–347.
Published: 01 December 1953
... of these precedents in his development of an old biblical theme and yet to keep my theory sound. Milton undoubtedly followed the Odyssey and the Aeneid in making the epic order of events different from the merely chronological. Thus, as we have Odysseus and Aeneas recount after the respective poems have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (3): 341–364.
Published: 01 September 2004
... Civilizations Project. Among his publications are Religion and Colonization in Ancient Greece (1987), Myth and Territory in the Spartan Mediterranean (1994), and The Returns of Odysseus: Colonization and Ethnicity (1998), as well as an edited collection, Ancient Perceptions of Greek Ethnicity (2001...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (3): 291–315.
Published: 01 September 1986
... issues. Nothing in the story of Odysseus and Telem- achus suggests why Joyce should have brought the son to center stage here: he plays no role in the central books of the Odyssey, and certainly is not involved in the navigation of his father’s craft be- tween Scylla and Charybdis...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 196–200.
Published: 01 June 1977
... page, a line from Horace refers to Odysseus and, presumably, to Tom Jones. He refers, once only in this vast novel, to “epic,” facetiously proclaiming “a Rule necessary to be observed in all Prosai-comi-epic Writing” (V.i). He once 198...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (1): 82–87.
Published: 01 March 1988
... and A Draft ofXVI Cantos, after which he sees Pound yielding to rival systems of historiography. Throughout, Pound’s paradigm was Odysseus’s summoning of ghosts in Book 11 of the Odyssey, which he eventually reworked into the opening of The Cantos. Like Odysseus, the poet-historian must first...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (1): 82–87.
Published: 01 March 1988
..., Pound’s paradigm was Odysseus’s summoning of ghosts in Book 11 of the Odyssey, which he eventually reworked into the opening of The Cantos. Like Odysseus, the poet-historian must first conjure up and then revivify figures from the past before they can speak in his poetry. 84...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (4): 418–420.
Published: 01 December 1974
... tex t i n which we should view Dante’s enigmatic clepiction of Ulysses” (p. Y), or again, “And as Socrates had rejected the study of the external world in order to focus on man, so Odysseus’s leaving Calypso to return to Penelope depicts the renunciation of science for philosophy, the true...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1990) 51 (1): 5–24.
Published: 01 March 1990
... 17 writes, in “a controversy quite irrelevant to the tragic situation.”22 The controversy is, however, most relevant to the defunct moral- ity which dominates the last part of the play. Odysseus enters, and although he had been an enemy of Ajax earlier, he now argues for the hero’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 95–98.
Published: 01 March 2012
... in subsequent ages. For example, when Frans Hals real- izes that the mysterious painter who asks him to sit for his portrait is actually Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus in disguise.’ ” Thus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 98–101.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus in disguise.’ ” Thus, Barolsky notes, Homer “casts a long shadow over the history of art” Insofar as whimsy occasionally outpaces discretion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 101–104.
Published: 01 March 2012
... in the features of the artist in subsequent ages. For example, when Frans Hals real- izes that the mysterious painter who asks him to sit for his portrait is actually Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 105–108.
Published: 01 March 2012
... in the features of the artist in subsequent ages. For example, when Frans Hals real- izes that the mysterious painter who asks him to sit for his portrait is actually Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 108–112.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus in disguise.’ ” Thus, Barolsky notes, Homer “casts a long shadow over the history of art” Insofar as whimsy occasionally outpaces discretion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 112–114.
Published: 01 March 2012
... Hals real- izes that the mysterious painter who asks him to sit for his portrait is actually Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus in disguise.’ ” Thus, Barolsky notes, Homer “casts a long...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 2012
... painter who asks him to sit for his portrait is actually Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus in disguise.’ ” Thus, Barolsky notes, Homer “casts a long shadow over the history of art...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 117–121.
Published: 01 March 2012
... in the features of the artist in subsequent ages. For example, when Frans Hals real- izes that the mysterious painter who asks him to sit for his portrait is actually Van Dyck, Hals sees his visitor, according to the biographer Houbraken, as a “kind of ‘Odysseus...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (2): 159–180.
Published: 01 June 2015
... destitute. Inns are a regular feature of Fielding’s fictional landscapes and are especially significant in the context of Joseph’s epic nostos , which harks back to the hospitality that Odysseus is conspicuously offered at a number of stages during his journey. They allow us to track what happens...