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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1975) 36 (1): 84–86.
Published: 01 March 1975
... such a child as this. , These Hymnes may worke on future wits, and so May great Grand children of thy prayses grow. STEPHENBOOTH University of California, Berkeley The Blaze of Noon: A Reading of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1979) 40 (3): 317–319.
Published: 01 September 1979
...” and Niglitmare Abbey, but for all his research into sources, parallels, and traditions, he failed to supersede J. B. Priestley’s modest fifty- year-old study that finds Peacock a “baffled idealist.” Dawson’s intention in Vic- torinn Noon is description rather than reevaluation, so he cannot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1973) 34 (1): 20–35.
Published: 01 March 1973
...B. J. Layman Copyright © 1973 by Duke University Press 1973 TOURNEUR’S ARTIFICIAL NOON THE DESIGN OF THE REVENGER’S TRAGEDY By B. J. LAYMAN The characters of The Revenger’s Tragedy have “nimble and des- perate tongues...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1968) 29 (2): 168–182.
Published: 01 June 1968
... falling of the sun. This pattern-rising at dawn, taking refuge from the heat of the sun at noon, and retiring in the evening- owes little to the epic antecedents of Paradise Lost or to the various models that shaped Milton’s conception of Paradise, but descriptions of the three primary times...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 90–92.
Published: 01 March 1972
... disconcerting perhaps is the way in which Liberman permits Por- ter’s finest single work, Noon Wine, to become lost in some not-very-impor- tant distinctions drawn between the novella and the short story. On another level, is there sufficient evidence offered for reading “Maria Concepcion’’ as an...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 92–95.
Published: 01 March 1972
... therefore the method are more polemical than critical. And the chapter which brings to- gether “He,” “Holiday,” and Noon Wine in order to study the ironic inter- play between articulation and inarticulation is challenging and original, but at a cost: for the second time in Liberman’s book, the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1952) 13 (2): 212–213.
Published: 01 June 1952
...- noon glow. Professor May explains the crisis of pessimism by a great variety of reasons, taken from Diderot’s life. These reasons, collected *Paris : Boivin et Cle, Editions Contemporaines, 1951. Pp. 209. 212 Herbert Dieckmann...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1966) 27 (4): 371–387.
Published: 01 December 1966
... him to “see the kingdom of God” (John 3:s). The metaphor insists on God’s “glorious noon,” yet associates it with the “healing wings” of the Incarnation and Ivith the temporal night which is “The day of Spirits.” The first two stanzas establish the light relationships of the metaphor...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1979) 40 (3): 319–322.
Published: 01 September 1979
... like this one: Explaining that Victorian Noon has been a compromise between the “demands of coherence” and the “demands of diversity,” he notes that it has “probably stirred up too many ashes, and it may seem to have done too little to provide sustaining theo- ries” (p. 224). His...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1984) 45 (4): 420–422.
Published: 01 December 1984
.... Lawrence: Mr Noon. Cambridge, London, New York: Cambridge University Press, The Cambridge Edition of the Letters and Works of D. H. Lawrence, 1984. xlvi + 370 pp. $24.95. Watson, Robert N. Shakespeare and the Hazards of Ambition. Cambridge, Mass., and London: Harvard University Press, 1984...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 451–457.
Published: 01 December 1949
... alle the ordres foure is noon that kan so muchel of daliaunce and fair langage as the Friar. There was nowhere swich a vavasour as the Frankeleyn; and the Parson of the Town ! a bettre preest I trowe that nowhere noon ys. So greet a purchasour was nowhere noon, ne was ther swich another...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1973) 34 (2): 146–160.
Published: 01 June 1973
...; Death the Skeleton And Time the Shadow. (26-28) Whatever allegorical schema might be inferred from these figures, their primary importance lies in the fact that their contradictory ’@Wordsworth also refers to noon-spirits in “The Danish Boy. A Fragment” (1799A Spirit...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1976) 37 (4): 349–369.
Published: 01 December 1976
...,” A Sonnet is a moment’s monument,- Memorial from the Soul’s eternity Toone dead deathless hour. The sonnet is to isolate one climactic moment and preserve it in spite of change and mutability. Among the sonnets that realize this aim, “Silent Noon” is perhaps...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1975) 36 (1): 82–84.
Published: 01 March 1975
... University of California, Berkeley The Blaze of Noon: A Reading of “Samson Agonistes.” By ANTHONYLOW. New York and London: Columbia University Press, 1974. ix + 236 pp. 8 12.00. Kepeatedly, Anthony Low remarks upon how the promise of heaven or the divine perspective “lies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1979) 40 (2): 213–216.
Published: 01 June 1979
.... $18.50. Cunningham, Gail. The New Woman and the Victorian Novel. New York: Harper & Row, Barnes & Noble Import Division, 1978. viii + 172 pp. $21.50. Dawson, Carl. Victorian Noon: English Literature in 1850. Baltimore and London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979. xv + 268 pp. $16.00...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1975) 36 (1): 21–53.
Published: 01 March 1975
... angel bright” (10.327), the sun is rising in Aries to its meridian height at noon, so that when Satan is transformed into a serpent he is at the opposite pole from the sun, in the position of a lunar ec1ip~e.l~His light has been entirely extinguished.14 Cirillo observes: “Thus Satan as the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1961) 22 (1): 37–40.
Published: 01 March 1961
... that he uses an informal rather than a formal dating method. For example, the short-time references are to “morwen,” “fro soper unto bedde,” “at pryme,” “a Mayes morwe,” “after noon,” “dayes two,” “er houres twyes twelve,” and “the mountance of an houre.”5 The long-time references are to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1979) 40 (3): 312–317.
Published: 01 September 1979
... sources, parallels, and traditions, he failed to supersede J. B. Priestley’s modest fifty- year-old study that finds Peacock a “baffled idealist.” Dawson’s intention in Vic- torinn Noon is description rather than reevaluation, so he cannot be accused of promising more than he delivers when he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1962) 23 (3): 263–271.
Published: 01 September 1962
... encouragement. Cf. “Sea Surface Full of Clouds” and Whitehead‘s “a sense-object perceived at one time is a distinct object from a sense-object seen at another time. Thus the sight . . . at noon is distinct from its sight at 12:30.” The Aims of Educatiort, Mentor Book (New York, 1949), p. 128...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1975) 36 (4): 339–353.
Published: 01 December 1975
..., is linked by couplet-rhyme. These two sections are also linked because they comprise a single speech by Egelond’s wife, Edyff: Penne sayde be cuntasse: “So moot I the, I wil noui.?t lette tyl I bere he, Tomorwen or it lie noone; -1.0 see hem...