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nana

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (1): 75–105.
Published: 01 March 2011
...Christopher L. Hill In the decades following the publication of Emile Zola's novel Nana (1880), “Nana figures” resembling Zola's heroine appeared in fiction around the world. The history of the Nana figure contradicts current models for the study of world literature, based on the diffusion of forms...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 360–372.
Published: 01 December 1962
... i ses enfants tm livre plein de merveilleuses gravures, il lui fallait vivement et frequemment tourner le feuillet devant telle ou telle nuditk.6 Louis Ulbach opened a sharp attack on Nana with the speculation that Zola sought to protect his book from criticism by filling it with filth...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2022) 83 (1): 124–127.
Published: 01 March 2022
... topoi found in many such works also roughly correspond to three Émile Zola novels, L’assommoir , Nana , and Germinal , and to the titular figures that serve as the locus for the three main body chapters, titled “The Degenerate Body,” “The Unbound Woman,” and “Plains, Boats, and Backwaters.” Each...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (1): 64–80.
Published: 01 March 1985
... involved, Bibighar and Chillianwallah, provide the link. During the Indian Mutiny, the Nana Sahib of Bithur promised fair terms of armistice to the British community besieged at Cawnpore. After they left their defenses, he treacherously am- bushed them, killing most. Later, as British...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 165–176.
Published: 01 June 1948
... as did Nana, but rather are presented as unfortunate victims who fight against each successive step downward. As we follow Monsalvat in his long fruitless searches for Nacha from one brothel to another, we share his repulsion and disgust at what he finds.’ The reader can readily imagine...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (3): 206–210.
Published: 01 September 1957
... dans Yurt (Paris, 1890), pp. 366-67. 8E.-M. de VogiiC, “La DCbicle,” Revue des Deux Modes, series 111, CXII (Aug. 15, 1892), 448. 208 Zolds Romanticism objects. Thus Nana was sometimes taken as a symbol of France rotting under the Second Empire, and Maurice and Jean...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 165–178.
Published: 01 June 1960
... possilile only in periods free from the rational and moral restraints of the present. For the portrait of the Duchess there were nnny ininiediate prede- cessors. Tlmn’s Hedcla Gahler, Wedeliind’s Lu~u,Zola’s Nana, are od!. some of the more familiar studies of an outstandin!; wo~iia~isuf...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 367–371.
Published: 01 September 2010
... 377 Beauty thus envisioned, Mao proposes, might be called “fateful beauty.” His phrase, emphasizing beauty’s power to determine us, simultaneously dissociates beauty from what we assume naturalism would make of it: a fatal- ity. In Zola, one might recall, even when Nana’s beauty — and her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 371–373.
Published: 01 September 2010
... 377 Beauty thus envisioned, Mao proposes, might be called “fateful beauty.” His phrase, emphasizing beauty’s power to determine us, simultaneously dissociates beauty from what we assume naturalism would make of it: a fatal- ity. In Zola, one might recall, even when Nana’s beauty — and her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 374–376.
Published: 01 September 2010
... 377 Beauty thus envisioned, Mao proposes, might be called “fateful beauty.” His phrase, emphasizing beauty’s power to determine us, simultaneously dissociates beauty from what we assume naturalism would make of it: a fatal- ity. In Zola, one might recall, even when Nana’s beauty — and her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 376–379.
Published: 01 September 2010
... 377 Beauty thus envisioned, Mao proposes, might be called “fateful beauty.” His phrase, emphasizing beauty’s power to determine us, simultaneously dissociates beauty from what we assume naturalism would make of it: a fatal- ity. In Zola, one might recall, even when Nana’s beauty — and her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 380–384.
Published: 01 September 2010
... 377 Beauty thus envisioned, Mao proposes, might be called “fateful beauty.” His phrase, emphasizing beauty’s power to determine us, simultaneously dissociates beauty from what we assume naturalism would make of it: a fatal- ity. In Zola, one might recall, even when Nana’s beauty — and her...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 582–602.
Published: 01 December 1969
... de las Siete-rozas,” is divided into two sections. In the first of these (chap. S), the revenge oE the land is carried a stage further when one group of Indians, the Tecunes, murders another, the Zacatones, after a curandero has revealed that the Zacatones bewitched the aging Nana Tech...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (3): 295–317.
Published: 01 September 1991
... postscripts to various correspondents- “My nanae is Marian Evans Laues”-itself an act of willed renaming that points up the source of Liggins’s successful imposture; Liggins’s camp merely exploited the indeterminacy of the secret authorship. That they could do so for so long, unchecked...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (4): 345–382.
Published: 01 December 1994
... Master, George Eliot’s Casaubon, Huysmans’s Des Esseintes, Kipling’s Creigh ton -or reproducing an anthropological perspective in their narrative point of view, from Balzac’s Cousine Bette, Flaubert’s SalammbG, Melville’s “Encantadas,”Zola’s Nana, and Pater’s Marks the Epicurean...