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monologue

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (2): 229–239.
Published: 01 June 1967
...Derek Bickerton Copyright © 1967 by Duke University Press 1967 MODES OF INTERIOR MONOLOGUE A FORMAL DEFINITION By DEREKBICKERTON Every novelist who tries to present character in depth faces the prob- lem of conveying...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 3–12.
Published: 01 March 1963
...H. A. Kelly, S.J. Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 CONSCIOUSNESS IN THE MONOLOGUES OF ULYSSES By H. A. KELLY,S.J. The year 1955 marked the climax of a renewed interest in the lit- erary technique of stream of consciousness. In that year...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 260–263.
Published: 01 June 1970
... centre around the relationship between the speaker and his environment or, more simply, the functions of “voice and address.” (p. xiii) Each monologue, therefore, will be considered in terms of (1) the speaker, (2) the addressee or audience, (3) the third person (the absentee who...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (1): 82–85.
Published: 01 March 1978
..., but historically disparate genres-the dramatic monologue and the prosopopoeia, or impersonationsuller seeks to a1 ter our generic preconcep- tions about such poems as “Oenone,” “Tithonus,” “Ulysses,” and “Tiresias.” A preliminary conception of a poem’s generic type determines in advance what most...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 1997
... or herself, and dramatists began to employ a new kind of soliloquy that represented thought (and that was actually an interior monologue, even though that term was not introduced until much later). The highest purpose of this new kind of soliloquy was to repre- sent the innermost thoughts...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (3): 225–230.
Published: 01 September 1958
... as the monologue of a wanderer, which is in turn set forth and commented upon by the poet; they have concluded that it is, after all, little more than an extremely primitive elegy, or that it is essen- tially a kind of lament-and-consolation poetic e~emplum.~ 1 The theory of these interpolations...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2005) 66 (4): 505–538.
Published: 01 December 2005
... new verse form to the English language.”23 If so, then interpreting these poems should be a much more complicated affair than reading protocols have hitherto allowed. Whereas unreconstructed attempts to assimilate the blues poems into the genre of dramatic monologue (perceiving the “I...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (2): 193–214.
Published: 01 June 2014
... . Browning after a Generation: The First Presidential Address to the Australian English Association . Sydney : English Association . ———. 1925 . The Dramatic Monologue in the Victorian Period . London : Published for the British Academy by Oxford University Press . ———. n.d. “Jottings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2014) 75 (2): 171–191.
Published: 01 June 2014
... . Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press . Croly J. C. Mrs. 1898 . The History of the Women’s Club Movement in America . New York : Allen . Curry S. S. 1906 . Browning and the Dramatic Monologue: Nature and Interpretation of an Overlooked Form of Literature . Boston...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 329–340.
Published: 01 September 1968
... novelists” (and Vargas Llosa) refuse to admit that they know any more about their protagonists than the reader does; they allow their char- acters to reveal themselves only through their actions, dialogues, inte- rior monologues (streams of consciousness), or through the minds of other...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 422–426.
Published: 01 June 2000
... mind Tennyson’s dramatic monologues (including In Memoriam)2 or Arnold’s melancholy personas, even Wordsworth’s prosaic poetry was instantly revealed as “literary” by Coleridge in the Biographia. So why is it so interesting to ask—as Yopie Prins repeat...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 161–166.
Published: 01 June 1945
..., 47 vols. (Madrid, 1888-1922). Teatro is vol. 35. 2Undertaken in January, 1906, long after the acclaim with which her Los Pazos de Ullou (1886) and La madre naturaleza (1887) were received. Her monologues, however, are earlier : 1898 and 1904. *I have examined the following...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 415–419.
Published: 01 June 2000
....”1 Cultured Victori- ans would not have imagined that an “I” in a lyric poem belonged to a uni- fied or autobiographical self; never mind Tennyson’s dramatic monologues (including In Memoriam)2 or Arnold’s melancholy personas, even Wordsworth’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 419–421.
Published: 01 June 2000
... mind Tennyson’s dramatic monologues (including In Memoriam)2 or Arnold’s melancholy personas, even Wordsworth’s prosaic poetry was instantly revealed as “literary” by Coleridge in the Biographia. So why is it so interesting to ask—as Yopie Prins repeat...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 426–432.
Published: 01 June 2000
... mind Tennyson’s dramatic monologues (including In Memoriam)2 or Arnold’s melancholy personas, even Wordsworth’s prosaic poetry was instantly revealed as “literary” by Coleridge in the Biographia. So why is it so interesting to ask—as Yopie Prins repeat...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (2): 115–136.
Published: 01 June 1981
... reason Camillo, Florizel, and Perdita do not overhear Autolycus’s monologue is that they are deeply absorbed in discussing the details of their intended flight from Bohemia. They are so absorbed that they do not even notice his en- trance, and they are certainly not on stage with the expressed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 130–139.
Published: 01 June 1972
... claims that “Fancy with fact is just one fact the more”;l he writes The Ring and the Book to find some new adjustment of their claims. The same problem of combining imagination and intellect is the explicit subject of one of Tennyson’s most exciting monologues, “Lucretius,”2 in which...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (1): 61–76.
Published: 01 March 1968
... could argue that As I Lay Dying is patternless to a fault-that it is, in places, confused and self-destroying. The crucial monologue of Addie Bundren, for instance, is a marvel of dazzling unintelligi- bility. Why does she call herself “three” (herself, Cash, and Darl) *For example...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 432–447.
Published: 01 December 1953
..., and it is not in vain that his imagination dwells on the skull of Yorick, the clown, and that he conceives the play within the play. He is the only real actor. Gautier addresses him in this manner: The great question for you is that of the monologue. You have the vertigo of life, the dream of a shadow...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 172–176.
Published: 01 June 1963
...), 417-48, 3 See N. Bryllion Fagin, “Herman Melville and the Interior Monologue,” AL, VI (1934-35) 433-34, for a discussion of the likeness of Chapters 37, 38, and 39 of Moby-Dick and James Joyce’s “stream of consciousness.” 172 J. J...