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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 115–124.
Published: 01 June 1961
...Terence Martin Copyright © 1961 by Duke University Press 1961 THE UNITY OF MOLL FLANDERS By TERENCEMARTIN The flat, episodic nature of the narrative in Moll Flanders leaves Moll herself as the one immediately discernible principle of unity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (1): 33–40.
Published: 01 March 1966
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (2): 369–379.
Published: 01 June 1996
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (4): 456–459.
Published: 01 December 1972
... statements, 1 do not; so for the purposes of this review I will divide my discussion between Starr’s critical approach and his treatment of casuistry. I will begin with Starr’s discussion of the famous section of Moll Flanders in which Moll meets and marries her Lancashire husband, Jemmy, she...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (2): 224–226.
Published: 01 June 1966
... Press, 1965. xiii + 203 pp. $6.50. G. A. Starr seeks to show Defoe’s debt, in Robinson Crusoe, Moll Flanders, and Roxana, to the tradition of spiritual autobiography in the seventeenth century. In reviewing the tradition, he concentrates on Presbyterian and Anglican sources rather than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (3): 353–356.
Published: 01 September 1966
... chosen as major objects of study-Moll Flanders and Tom Jones-are not essentially in the picaresque mode. Ostensibly, the Spanish picaresque tradition is substantially ignored because it has already been thoroughly studied by F. W. Chandler and others. But one suspects that it may also have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (3): 287–291.
Published: 01 September 1980
..., Singleton, Moll, and Crusoe exist both in his readers’ time, “the flow of historical time,” and “outside their own periods . . . in that timeless realm of the imagination where they may easily be regarded as one of us” (p. 41). Yet when Alkon shows the coupling of chronologies in the fictions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1966) 27 (2): 226–228.
Published: 01 June 1966
...Lewis M. Knapp Copyright © 1966 by Duke University Press 1966 Donald Bruce. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1965. 240 pp. $4.95. 226 REVIEWS Moll’s editor is not assured of her change of heart, we may also be uncertain. And if we...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 194–196.
Published: 01 June 1977
... and created a character whose unwillingness to lie to herself brings her close to madness. And with that creation and self-discovery he gave up fiction. Zimmerman reads Moll Flanders, Colonel Jack, and Roxana in terms of Defoe’s technical achievement in allowing the reader to see the disparity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2004) 65 (3): 457–480.
Published: 01 September 2004
... and of Western morality. For Swift, the Tokugawa policy of sakoku (closed country) isolates Japan from the corruptions of modern Eu- 12 [Herman Moll], Atlas Geographus; or, A Compleat System of Geography, Ancient and Modern, 5 vols. (London, 1711–17), 3:818. Moll reissued different versions of his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 132–148.
Published: 01 June 1977
... Jour- nal, but they remain incipient or latent-certainly revealing but pre- sented in troubled confusion. The ways in which he will broach and then evade such provocative details evidence both his desire for honesty and the boundaries of his understanding. Boswell is much like Moll...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (4): 410–418.
Published: 01 December 1983
... much like his fictional narrators, for whom the sublime is always beyond description (p. 32). And double-entendres and paren- thetical asides issue from such autobiographers as Moll Flanders and Roxana as well as the quite different biographer of Jonathan Wild (pp. 82, 84, 103, 123...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 453–456.
Published: 01 December 2001
... works, his discussions are always nuanced, provocative, and valuable to students of the period. His second chapter, on Defoe, is particu- larly well done. In Robinson Crusoe (1719), Colonel Jack (1722), Moll Flanders (1722), and Roxana (1724), Richetti subtly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 456–460.
Published: 01 December 2001
... to students of the period. His second chapter, on Defoe, is particu- larly well done. In Robinson Crusoe (1719), Colonel Jack (1722), Moll Flanders (1722), and Roxana (1724), Richetti subtly traces a changing relationship between psychological and social space. His...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 461–465.
Published: 01 December 2001
... to students of the period. His second chapter, on Defoe, is particu- larly well done. In Robinson Crusoe (1719), Colonel Jack (1722), Moll Flanders (1722), and Roxana (1724), Richetti subtly traces a changing relationship between psychological and social space. His...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 465–468.
Published: 01 December 2001
... to students of the period. His second chapter, on Defoe, is particu- larly well done. In Robinson Crusoe (1719), Colonel Jack (1722), Moll Flanders (1722), and Roxana (1724), Richetti subtly traces a changing relationship between psychological and social space. His...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 468–474.
Published: 01 December 2001
... works, his discussions are always nuanced, provocative, and valuable to students of the period. His second chapter, on Defoe, is particu- larly well done. In Robinson Crusoe (1719), Colonel Jack (1722), Moll Flanders (1722), and Roxana (1724), Richetti subtly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (4): 415–427.
Published: 01 December 1994
... that their subversive differences almost seem like denials of its force. Nowhere is the utter disregard for the voice of blood in early-eigh- teenthcentury fiction more extravagantly illustrated than in Moll Flan- ders ( 172 2). Defoe represents Moll as marrying her own brother with- out any inkling...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (2): 139–172.
Published: 01 June 2017
... and the best of what it inspires—take the case of the first ballad opera in England, John Gay’s Beggar’s Opera (1728). But consider Moll Flanders (1722), a popular novel ascribed to Defoe some forty years after his death. Quite a few literary historians have praised the novel as an important stepping-stone...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 110–111.
Published: 01 March 1967
... Donovan into overstate- ment. His chapter on Moll Flanders exaggerates the consistency and control of Defoe’s irony, lvhile his treatment of I’cr11zcIn-altlioiigh it is refreshingly free of the standard argument concerning Pamela’s “morality”-iiiakes clainis for Richardson’s handling...