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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 237–244.
Published: 01 September 1963
...Allen Guttmann Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 FROM TYPEE TO MOBY-DICK MELVILLE’S ALLUSIVE ART By ALLEN GUTTMANN The complex allusiveness of T. S. Eliot and James Joyce has been the subject of much adverse criticism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 172–176.
Published: 01 June 1963
...J. J. Boies Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 THE WHALE WITHOUT EPILOGUE By J. J. BOIES Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick was first published by Richard Bentley in London in a three-volume edition entitled The Whale ( 1851...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (4): 325–331.
Published: 01 December 1955
..., was followed in the Transcript by a list of works which included these erudite items: “a philosophical romance, ‘Redburn’ ; ‘Plute [sic] Jacket ; or the World on [sic] a Man-of-War’ ; ‘Moby Dick’ ; ‘Pierre’ ; ‘Israel Potter’ ; ‘The Prazza [sic] Tales’ . . . .” The Albany Argus, by the same day, had...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 195–206.
Published: 01 June 1940
... and his work in a way that leaves them recognizable though unreal. For example: The best general discussion of Melville in print insists that “with Mardi, Moby-Dick, and Pierre . . . . he deliberate- ly set himself against the main currents of fiction-writing of his time” ; it refers...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 337–352.
Published: 01 December 1962
... seems to have made an independent, implicit judg- ment which emerges in those sections of Moby-Dick deriving from the Holy State. Melville as creative artist thus appears as a deeper and more perceptive critic than his professional contemporaries ;5 and con- 1 Merton M. Sealts, Jr...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 125–134.
Published: 01 June 1961
...- counters them, so to speak, with the arrival of every fresh disaster. In Moby Dick, Captain Ahab sets forth with distinctively Emer- sonian expectations. The white whale, as Ahab conceives of it, is simply a visible object, fraught with metaphysical meaning. Under- taking his voyage around...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 54–66.
Published: 01 March 1972
...’ By HERSHELPARKER The Melville industry’s biggest year was 1970, with at least eight books. Complicity exempts me from discussing three of them: “Moby-Dick” as Doubloon and two volumes in the Northwestern- Newberry Edition, Marcli and .White-Jacket. Even without these three, the others...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 317–324.
Published: 01 September 1950
... Melville’s books there is warm understanding and sympathy shown for the Negro. In Redburn Melville speaks of the freedom Negro sailors enjoy in Liverpool as contrasted with the restrictions on them in their own country.ll In Moby Dick Melville hits a high-water mark in his presentation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 181–186.
Published: 01 June 1964
... mastered the com- mon techniques of fiction.“lHis early works were strongly autobio- graphical, and, once he had found his theme, his knowledge of the craft of fiction was no match for his vision of metaphysical immensity. His later works, from Moby-Dick to Budd,Billy provide ample evidence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (2): 173–186.
Published: 01 June 1988
... historical romance? Does not Melville’s “insular city of the Manhattoes, belted round by wharves . . . [and] commerce,” have this same “authenticating force” in Moby-Dick? Still less satisfactory is Dekker’s definition of the “romance.” Having opened this can of worms, he attempts to close...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 218–219.
Published: 01 June 1952
... symbolizes the Fall.” (Here the Fall would be succeeded by Eden.) Granted that Moby-Dick, Pierre, The Confidence Man, Billy Budd, and much of Melville’s other work merit search for complex intention, surely Professor Chase is putting a burden of symbolism on Typee more oppressive than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 118–127.
Published: 01 June 1956
..., for the opening words of his next book (Moby-Dick) are “Call me Ishmael.” In Moby-Dick the recurrent image, hitherto delectable, becomes a shape of death-a coffin or a whale; but whereas the delectable image threatened death, the threatening image carries life in its belly, Life-in-Death. Immersed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (1): 105–110.
Published: 01 March 1993
... and Moby-Dick, that still count as literature for many readers of the late twentieth century. Other valu- able prose narratives of the time, such as Uncle Tom’s Cabin, often trou- ble readers now because they fit into no clear conceptual category. Accordingly, chapters 1 through 3 define...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (2): 159–164.
Published: 01 June 1951
... in the ranks of the amateurs. Though he was later, in Moby-Dick, to show a surprising mastery of cetological information, in the trial period of Mardi he seems to have relied upon reading restricted to semi-scientific works like those of Bennett and other travel writers as well as upon his own...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 375–412.
Published: 01 December 1953
... of “Symbolism in Moby-Dick” in the Journal of the History of Ideas (1951), where I discuss the present-day inten- tional or unintentional ignoring of the writer’s intention, I have come upon a somewhat relevant opinion of Mr. Eliot’s. “Perhaps all great works of art,” says the fine critic in his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 344–345.
Published: 01 June 1965
... artistic problems in practical terms, and in this light the positive attainment of American writers cannot be adequately presented. His analysis of Moby Dick, however, seems to me extraordinarily revealing, and the other literary discussions are very well sustained. In general, this book...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (4): 528–530.
Published: 01 December 1999
... her debt to Foucault by arguing that while the Revolution’s ideas were “produced by the discourse of natural rights, [they] were not intrinsically attached to a particular political agenda or class” but, rather, were “mobi- lized and deployed for different and often opposed ideological...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1965
... of practical thought is not an artistic failure, his whole method causes him to put artistic problems in practical terms, and in this light the positive attainment of American writers cannot be adequately presented. His analysis of Moby Dick, however, seems to me extraordinarily revealing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2005) 66 (3): 365–390.
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (2): 282–284.
Published: 01 June 1999
... transparent or legible. But what about the materiality of the language itself? A cheap paperback copy of Moby-Dzck may be available to more readers than the thousand-dollar Arion Press edition whose craftsmanship he scrutinizes, but Melville’s allu- sive, punning, digressive language is no less...