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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (1): 120–123.
Published: 01 March 1994
... (lggo), Wang’s work attempts to wrest modern Chinese literary realism from the grip of the tired Marxist paradigm imposed by Mao Zedong in his 1942 pronouncements at Ya’nan. Only recently relinquished, the old narrative told of an ever-more confident socialist ideology taking increasing hold...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 97–118.
Published: 01 March 2008
... She's representation of Dr. Mao and Dr. Wen also pose challenging questions for his contemporaries and for twenty-first-century readers alike: Can one ever refuse to be defined by the local, either by birth or by acculturation? What are the implications and consequences if one so chooses? © 2008...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 376–379.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Robert L. Caserio Fateful Beauty: Aesthetic Environments, Juvenile Development, and Literature, 1860 – 1960 .By Douglas Mao. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. x + 319 pp. University of Washington 2010 Reviews Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy. By Joseph Luzzi...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 367–371.
Published: 01 September 2010
...-2010-017 Fateful Beauty: Aesthetic Environments, Juvenile Development, and Literature, 1860 – 1960. By Douglas Mao. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. x + 319 pp. Naturalism and aestheticism insist that environments determine us. Does the shared insistence mean...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 371–373.
Published: 01 September 2010
...-2010-017 Fateful Beauty: Aesthetic Environments, Juvenile Development, and Literature, 1860 – 1960. By Douglas Mao. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. x + 319 pp. Naturalism and aestheticism insist that environments determine us. Does the shared insistence mean...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 374–376.
Published: 01 September 2010
..., Race, and Psychoanalysis” appeared in the March 2003 issue of MLQ. doi 10.1215/00267929-2010-017 Fateful Beauty: Aesthetic Environments, Juvenile Development, and Literature, 1860 – 1960. By Douglas Mao. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. x + 319 pp. Naturalism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 380–384.
Published: 01 September 2010
..., Race, and Psychoanalysis” appeared in the March 2003 issue of MLQ. doi 10.1215/00267929-2010-017 Fateful Beauty: Aesthetic Environments, Juvenile Development, and Literature, 1860 – 1960. By Douglas Mao. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2008. x + 319 pp. Naturalism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (3): 249–267.
Published: 01 September 2018
... 2015 ), with emphasis on China’s. To my surprise, I received two papers exclusively devoted to Badiou’s thought and its relation to the Cultural Revolution and Maoism. They certainly informed my Chinese and even my Western colleagues about the influence of Mao’s theoretical doctrines. Here I briefly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (3): 323–340.
Published: 01 September 2018
...) is officially condemned by the CCP’s ( 1981 ) resolution as a political debacle and social calamity, and its legacy remains one of the most explosive and controversial issues in the post-Mao era, it is practically inconceivable to extol it publicly in China today “as a drastic revolution for humanity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 119–140.
Published: 01 March 2008
... Language Quarterly 69:1 (March 2008) doi 10.1215/00267929-2007-028  © 2008 by University of Washington 120 MLQ March 2008 Mao wenti, or “the Mao genre.”2 The emergence and proliferation of genres in critical discourse since then has contrasted post-Maoist...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2002) 63 (1): 89–118.
Published: 01 March 2002
...–Cultural Revolution or post-Mao era; the naming of the avant-garde came in the post- Tiananmen (1989) era, after the high political drama had gone awry; and the theoretical underpinning for the self-styled avant-garde critics and writers was postmodernism, imported from the West. As a literary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 81–96.
Published: 01 March 2008
... the founding of a new China, was launched to oppose the imitation and appropriation of Western modernism. This movement started in the 1940s, when Mao Zedong postulated the principle of “socialist content, national form,” contended that “speech must be that of the people,” and declared that these ideas...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 45–60.
Published: 01 March 2008
... the wife of Mao Zedong.) In Nanjing the nationalist government prevented a performance of A Doll’s House by the Grinding Wind Society (Mofeng Jushe), an amateur drama group. Wang Ping, a primary-school teacher who played Nora, was dismissed by her headmaster. This incident generated a heated...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 521–535.
Published: 01 December 2011
..., at the inaugural conference  Performing a New France of the Modernist Studies Association in 1999, which provided an annual venue devoted specifically to modernist scholarship; and third, in Doug- las Mao and Rebecca L. Walkowitz’s thorough survey of the field...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 13–27.
Published: 01 March 2008
... outcome is that some overrated canonical writers, such as Guo Moruo, Mao Dun, and Zhao Shuli, are subject to revaluation, whereas writers once marginalized for political reasons, including Shen Congwen, are in various stages of canonization. Increased cross-cultural contacts have brought about...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 167–185.
Published: 01 March 2008
... into their apartments, live off their money, and control them. Men, Chinese or foreign, become their vehicles in the pursuit of capitalist consumption and entertainment. To be sure, there have been accomplished women writers from Shanghai, such as Ru Zhijuan and Wang Anyi, in the post-Mao era...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (1): 63–70.
Published: 01 March 1978
..., Mao, DeGaulle) and when the historian at- tributes a meaning to that event. Writing history is, at all junctures, a task similar to writing fiction, to the extent that, in one case as in the other, it is up to the writer to create the meaning. This is why ap- proaching the work...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (1): 29–44.
Published: 01 March 2008
... with acquir- ing a formal style than with forging a highly individualistic sense; his experiments with form were so numerous that the style of one work is no guarantee for that of the next. As early as the 1920s Mao Dun, the famous Chinese novelist, perceived that “in the Chinese world of letters, Lu...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2018) 79 (4): 460–462.
Published: 01 December 2018
... addition to Western studies of the culture of the early years of the People’s Republic, a list that includes Chang-tai Hung’s Mao’s New World (2011) and Krista van Fleit Hang’s Literature the People Love (2013). Volland’s contribution demonstrates the international dimension of Chinese culture...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 395–414.
Published: 01 September 2012
... as a perverse form of proletarian literature, Performing a New France Lee traces this tradition back to Mao Zedong’s “Yan’an Talks on Literature and Art.” By contrast, Marston Anderson’s more Lukácsian observations present it as a major contribution to global...