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maid

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (3): 247–271.
Published: 01 September 1973
... makes its impression. Shall I say it? ’Tis the Heart alone that reconciles Con- trarieties, and admits of things incompatible. (La Bru- yere, The Characters) “THE VISIONARY MAID” TRAGIC PASSION...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 95–100.
Published: 01 March 1940
...E. H. Eby Copyright © 1940 by Duke University Press 1940 HERMAN MELVILLE’S “TARTARUS OF MAIDS” By E. H. EBY Scholars have been investigating of late the literary methods of Herman Melville, the nature and extent of his ideas, but have over...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 147–161.
Published: 01 March 2009
... has forty-four verses (fig. 7). In addition to the published verses, there were countless untold and unpublished variants. In the 1840s, though, the blackface musical idiom became more sophisticated. A good example is J. C. Scherpf’s 1847 piano piece “The Guinea Maid” (fig. 8...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (4): 472–475.
Published: 01 December 1950
... the maid as dn gemahele. Finally, certain attributes of the maid which at first seem inconsist- ent with her humble origin become in the light of our explication completely understandable : for example, the use of minneclich in line 1233 : “Ir lip der was vil minneclich.” This word Saran...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (1): 23–35.
Published: 01 March 1940
... herself a maid Q English and Scottish Popular Ballads, I, 493. See also Lutz Mackensen, “Der singende Knochen,” FF Communications, XLIX, Helsinki, 1923, pp. 14 ff. loEnglish and Scottish Popular Ballads, I, 151-57; Erk and Bohme, Deutscher Liederhort, I, 581-85, No. 190 ; Grundtvig...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 211–216.
Published: 01 June 1947
... a worthless present. Proof: “auch der magd bringt er nur diirftige dinge mit, im gegen- satz zu den wertvollen geschenken, die er fur die ‘damen’ des bauern- hofes . . . zusammengestohlen.” Thus, on careful examination, the seemingly casual remark about the maid’s presents is actually the pivot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (4): 347–368.
Published: 01 December 1981
..., he often tries to retreat behind his own or- thodoxy, as when he follows his sensual paean to “Andalusia’s maids’’ (64) with a reminder-more to himself, it seems, than to the reader-of the alluring nature of Vice (65). His admiration of Spanish womanhood has its source in the heroic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (1): 64–77.
Published: 01 March 1973
... that cannot be sustained. An apparently extraneous incident early in the novel actually repre- sents a further extension of the narrator’s “cloche” image, whose relev- ance to his own fate becomes evident only later on. He relates a vivid boyhood memory of a neighbor’s maid who goes mad, climbs up...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 498–507.
Published: 01 December 1969
...Charles A. Hallett Copyright © 1969 by Duke University Press 1969 MIDDLETON’S ALLWIT: THE URBAN CYNIC By CHARLESA. HALLEXT Speaking of Thomas Middleton’s A Chaste Maid in Cheapside, F. S. Boas remarked: “For grossly cynical audacity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (3): 340–355.
Published: 01 September 1969
... is regulated lawfully by a higher natural principle: Say there be; Yet nature is made better by no mean But nature makes that mean: so, over that art, Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 508–522.
Published: 01 December 1969
... A negro maid woos Cestus, a man of a different color What do I care if my face is black? Dark, 0 Cestus, has this color too, but love Wants it anyway. You are aware that always The forehead of the traveler is scorched. Ah, the girl who perishes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 187–195.
Published: 01 June 1945
..., a “Biscayner.” Isdaura seems unnaturally upset, but the wedding goes forward. On the wedding night a fire breaks out in the house, and in the excitement of extinguishing it a further tragedy occurs: Julia, Isdaura’s maid, falls into the well and drowns. Again Isdaura’s grief is extreme. Some...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 287–295.
Published: 01 June 1942
... of the young maid that a young “maid” has been his Cythna - “This child of twelve constant companion-“With her years old-so was she made My my happy infant hours I led sole associate, and her willing and is told that, once again, feet Wandered with mine. . . .” “The maid thou lovest thy wan...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (4): 436–441.
Published: 01 December 1986
... CHARLES R. FORKER 437 maids)- the three groups that make up “the genre’s paradigmatic social triangle” (p. 8). A couple of preliminary chapters examine the extraliterary actiiali ties of early Stuart London -social, economic, ideological -agains t...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (3): 289–298.
Published: 01 September 1972
....3 Because the plot requires that the mistress retain a desperate sang-froid, the maid is put forward as a substitute character to enact the murder that Lady Dedlock has “often, often, often wished’’ (chap. 55). Hortense may thus in some sense be seen as an embodiment of Lady Dedlock’s anger...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (4): 439–441.
Published: 01 December 1975
... of topics with which it deals. It is not possible in a short review to discuss, for example, what makes the Maid of Orleans “a saint out of season,” or how Fiesco is primarily a “player,” with the result that Schiller in his drama seems to be rejecting one of his most cherished ideas, play...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (1): 100–102.
Published: 01 March 1973
... and Cressida and Jonson’s A Staple of News, and reaches “The Limits of iMultiplicity” in A Chuste Maid in Cheapside and Bartholomew Fair. In a final chapter he considers how dramatists of the time reacted throughout their careers to the impulse to plot-variety, increasingly in some instances...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (4): 336–347.
Published: 01 December 1977
..., Carterhaugh (Kertonha, Charter’s ha’, Car- tershay, Charter’s Wood, Chester‘s Wood, Chaster’s Wood, Gordon’s wud, Moorcartney, the greenwood), he has been threatening all maid- ens who come near. A young woman, Janet (Jennet, Lady Margaret, Leady Margat, Fair Margret, May Margery, May, the maid...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (1): 20–35.
Published: 01 March 1973
... “fool-bashfulness, / That maid in the old time, whose flush of grace / Would never suffer her to get good clothes” (I.iii. 12-14). He prevails upon Gratiana to “chide away that foolish country-girl / Keeps company with your daughter, chastity” (II.i.82-83), and asks, “Who’d sit at home...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (3): 294–297.
Published: 01 September 1981
...: “Modern students of Mid- dleton accept the ascription to him on the title-page of Anything for a Quiet Lfe, 1662, and there is no support for Webster’s part in The Fair Maid ofthe Inn, from the first folio of Beaumont and Fletcher, 1647” (p. 199). Unfortunately, matters are not so simple...