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lucrece

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 458–460.
Published: 01 December 1953
...E. S. Miller Allan Holaday. Urbana: University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, XXXIV, NO. 3, 1950. Pp. ix + 185. $2.00, paper; $3.00, cloth. Copyright © 1953 by Duke University Press 1953 Thoma Heywood’s “The Rape of Lucrece.” Edited by ALLANHOLADAY. Urbana...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (4): 339–351.
Published: 01 December 1974
...G. W. Majors Copyright © 1974 by Duke University Press 1974 SHAKESPEARE’S FIRST BRUTUS HIS ROLE IN LUCRECE By G. W. MAJORS Moral ambiguities scarcely abound in The Rape of Lucrece. For all the atten tion given...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 457–458.
Published: 01 December 1953
.... MILLETTHENSHAW University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 457 Thoma Heywood’s “The Rape of Lucrece.” Edited by ALLANHOLADAY. Urbana : University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, XXXIV, No. 3, 1950. Pp. ix + 185. $2.00, paper; $3.00, cloth...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (4): 458–460.
Published: 01 December 1953
...Gretchen Paulus Austin Wright. Chicago: University of chicago Press, 1950. Pp. ix + 265. $4.00. Copyright © 1953 by Duke University Press 1953 Thoma Heywood’s “The Rape of Lucrece.” Edited by ALLANHOLADAY. Urbana : University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, XXXIV...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 1997
...). The early part of The Rape of I,ucrece focuses on five soliloquies by Tarquin; the later part, after the rape, on ten soliloquies by Lucrece. In one passage she soliloquizes for 27 2 lines without narrative interruption. These solilo- quies represent speech. Most are introduced by “quoth he” (253...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 354–356.
Published: 01 September 1968
... of Errors, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, and Love’s La- bour‘s Lost. Discussions of Venus and Adonis and Lucrece follow. The final chapters consider the resolution of what has gone before in Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. The order of the discussions is not meant...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1992) 53 (1): 5–22.
Published: 01 March 1992
... and history in a dignified manner, without reinterpreting them in the light of Christian and chivalrous principles” (p. 207). He describes how Lydgate “praises the ancients’ heroism and steadfast- ness, without any Christian bias . . . speaks favourably of [Lucrece’s] suicide” (p. 215), and “shows...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (1): 73–74.
Published: 01 March 1957
... inevitably be discussed. And while he provides some interesting speculation about the possible influence of Italian paintings upon Vmw and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece, the plays are discussed largely in the light of their Italian settings and of a hypothetical visit by Shakespeare...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 356–358.
Published: 01 September 1968
... a comparable study of the relationships between the sonnets and Shake- speare’s later plays or a study of Venus and Adonis and Lucrece in relation to The Phoenix and the Turtle. In brief, it is a pleasure to read and to review The Early Shakespeare...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (1): 71–73.
Published: 01 March 1957
... on Shakespeare, where plays must inevitably be discussed. And while he provides some interesting speculation about the possible influence of Italian paintings upon Vmw and Adonis and The Rape of Lucrece, the plays are discussed largely in the light of their Italian settings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1968) 29 (3): 351–354.
Published: 01 September 1968
...-a development that is balanced by the increasing sophistication of The Comedy of Errors, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, and Love’s La- bour‘s Lost. Discussions of Venus and Adonis and Lucrece follow. The final chapters consider the resolution of what has gone before in Richard III, Romeo and Juliet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (1): 73–76.
Published: 01 March 1988
...). In this system, the legends of Dido and Medea treat the problems of multiple viewpoints and the indeterminacy of truth; those of Lucrece and Ariadne, the inadequacy of knowledge and language to grasp present truth; Philomela, the relation of art and evil; Phyllis, the universality of human falseness...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (2): 253–256.
Published: 01 June 1950
... Record, Vol. 49, No. 6, February, 1950. Pp. 24. Hine, Reginald L. Charles Lamb and His Hertfordshire. New York : Macmilltan Company, 1950. Pp. xxv + 374. $3.75. Holaday, Allan. Thomas Heywood’s The Rape of Lucrece. Urbana : University of Illinois Studies in Language and Literature, XXXIV...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (3): 329–333.
Published: 01 September 1994
... the written petition gradually acquired ideological force, well before the mass petitions of the revolution- ary 1640s. Another section reconsiders the apparent disparity between the argument of Shakespeare’s Rape of Lucrece (with its vocabulary of early republicanism) and the poem’s political...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (2): 130–136.
Published: 01 June 1955
... Tweene frozen conscience and hot burning will. . . . (Lucrece, Stanza 36) The final lines of Macbeth’s soliloquy, then, as I read them, might be paraphrased thus : If this horrible deed is committed, it will cause such an upset in the natures of things...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 130–139.
Published: 01 June 1972
..., who consecrates the Lucretian void as “the sensorium of God,” he admits that there is no room for theology in his system. Even the heroic cele- bration of the Commonwealth and the martyrdom of Lucrece is fol- lowed by the typically Lucretian half-line of derision: “As I am breaking now...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1959) 20 (3): 233–242.
Published: 01 September 1959
... (“that vnhappy crime of nature, / Which you miscal my beauty”) is as equally irrelevant as Lucrece’s. After all, beauty is not a crime of nature; nature has its proper uses. The scene could only be concluded by Volpone taking his position to its logical conclusion in rape; but since Jonson has made...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (3): 431–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
... attributes the revolt of Cambridge in particular to mercenary motives (which the condemned man qualifies [155–7 perhaps to delegitimize his claim to the throne by typing him as Judas. 29 In the words of Lucrece, “O opportunity, thy guilt is great” (Rape...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (2): 213–225.
Published: 01 June 1996
... time” but after Columbus’s voyages, and largely after the march on Tenochtitlhn. It is only common sense to suggest that their mirrors of reality cannot not in Western Culture (London: Routledge, 1994); Richard L. Kagan, Lucrec-ia’s Dreams: Politics and Prophecy in Sixteenth-Century Spain...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2017) 78 (4): 443–464.
Published: 01 December 2017
... Ian . Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press . Boner Patrick J. 2013 . Kepler’s Cosmological Synthesis: Astrology, Mechanism, and the Soul . Leiden : Brill . Boyancé Pierre . 1963 . Lucrèce et l’épicurisme . Paris : Presses Universitaires de France . Burton...