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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (3): 268–276.
Published: 01 September 1952
...Paul Schach Copyright © 1952 by Duke University Press 1952 270 Loan Translations in Pennsylvania German /ge:lweSb/ and /harSmig/ correspond exactly to yellow-wasp and deer-fly. /slaqedogder/ is apparently a translation of smke-doctor, the common designation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 370–371.
Published: 01 December 1956
... und Lateirtisch (Bonn, 1949). Gneuss divides his work roughly as follows: I. History and appraisal of previous work pertaining to the subject; 11. Systematic illustration of Old English forms according to the Betz termin- ology; 111. Intensive examination of (Latin) loans in the Vesparian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 371.
Published: 01 December 1956
... work pertaining to the subject; 11. Systematic illustration of Old English forms according to the Betz termin- ology; 111. Intensive examination of (Latin) loans in the Vesparian Psultcr. The chief concern of the work is with “cultural borrowing” (Bloomfield) in what Haugen (Language...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
... Lutherans j . (3) MHG ii : dae:a “door”. (4) MHG ie : fae: ts6 “fourteen”, fae: tsic “forty”. VI. KG [ae] is a low-front vowel occurring in Eng. loan words in all positions, and in some words of German origin before [r] when followed by svarabakhti [a], [i] , or [ j] (for the one...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (3): 274–283.
Published: 01 September 1953
...”, and the English loan words bagiwib/-a “buggy-whip”, and rewa/-ra “river”. The word riv/-a “ring” is often pluralized in English fashion : rivs. ci:x [tsi:c] “pillow cover”, e:xha: s “squirrel”, Sa: b “moth”, listed under the correspond- ing heading by Reed, are not part of the active vocabulary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (1): 88–98.
Published: 01 March 1963
... and EinfEuss for influencia; and such new formations are now known as Lehniibersetzungen or loan translations. Even the word deutsch seems to have been modeled on the Latin adjective vulgaris. While scholars are quick to recognize Latin words and loan trans- lations in the Germanic languages...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (3): 329–349.
Published: 01 September 2012
... continuing stigma. In Surajpal Chauhan’s story “Saajish” (“Plot,” “Conspiracy the protagonist, Nathu, approaches a bank for a loan.22 The rst in his family to attend a university, Nathu 21 See also Surajpal Chauhan, “Parivartan ki baat” (“Speaking of Change...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (3): 322–342.
Published: 01 September 1948
... with the root-vowels of the singular, and (b) those which have a different root-vowel from that of the singular. English loan- words may have [-s] plurals, or they may be fitted into the pattern presented by one of the above-mentioned types; for example, the plural of [bugi] “buggy” may occur...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 326–339.
Published: 01 December 1956
... various ways in which he might proceed, not all of which would be possible in every case. He could take over either an existing native word or a well-established loan- word; he could adopt the Latin word of his original and so introduce a new loan-word into the language; he could employ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 101.
Published: 01 March 1943
.... Heffner, “Notes on Walther’s Use of konnen and mogen”; Albert F. Buffington, “English Loan Words in Pennsylvania Ger- man”; 0. W. Long, “Werther in America”; Harry W. Pfund, “George Henry Calvert, Admirer of Goethe” ; Charles F. Barnason, “Early Danish and Swedish Writers on Native History”; W...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 200–211.
Published: 01 June 1952
... : Surviving Lost Words Words War 33 42 Feudalism 10 19 Equestrian terms 22 13 Arabic loans 15 8 Dress fabrics 13 15 Religion 32 8 Foods. etc. 8 9 Admn., justice, gov. 5 6 Trade, etc...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (3): 497–498.
Published: 01 September 1942
... photostatic copies made for the benefit of libraries and other purchasers. Of slightly over one hundred of the titles listed there is not one copy in the United States. Probably the new achievement will involve loan librarians in some embarrassment, and bibliophiles may have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (4): 503–504.
Published: 01 December 1944
..., however, is probably not available for general use. The omission of my own Celtic library is due to my failure to describe it to Dr. VanMale. As a supplement to the ma- terials listed for inter-library loans, I cite a few of the titles: a complete run of the Transactions of the Gaelic Society...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (3): 359–360.
Published: 01 September 1944
... it supplanted. Noreen, on the other hand, was what one might call a hyperphilo- logist, one of those who would carry the sound-laws down to what amounts pretty nearly to laws based upon individual phenomena. W. G. Johnson discusses loan-words from English in the Swedish dialect still...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (3): 377–378.
Published: 01 September 1946
..., is its remarkable retention of inflexional endings and its considerable, but not complete, freedom from foreign loan words. A. LEROYANDREWS Cornell University ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 101–102.
Published: 01 March 1943
... Use of konnen and mogen”; Albert F. Buffington, “English Loan Words in Pennsylvania Ger- man”; 0. W. Long, “Werther in America”; Harry W. Pfund, “George Henry Calvert, Admirer of Goethe” ; Charles F. Barnason, “Early Danish and Swedish Writers on Native History”; W. F. Twaddell...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 230–231.
Published: 01 June 1945
... heroic legends given their due recognition once more, but the varied loans from classical art and science, and the contributions of patris- tic theology, also receive significant emphasis. These latter debts of Old English poetry are not always estimated at their true worth. Kennedy’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1971) 32 (1): 3–20.
Published: 01 March 1971
... of the Virgin Mary. When the knight laments that he can offer no guarantor for his loan, “But God that dyed on tree,” Robin is scornful. “l)o away thy iapis,” he says (stanzas 62-63). But mention of the Virgin brings a dif- fereri t response: “I haue none other,” sayde the knyght...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 409–410.
Published: 01 December 1963
... reports also associating with certain Florentine nuns to one of whom, referred to as “ma tante,” he loaned his hose and doublet to be used in the performance of a convent play. All this is in the strangest contrast to the almost contem- porary sojourn in the same Italian cities of the sage...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (1): 80–81.
Published: 01 March 1956
... a misleading name for the Icelandic landscape !) whereas dxarhrarin remains unchanged. The men from Modruveltir are the “men from Modruvellir,” whereas the Vatnsfirbingar are the “men from Water Firth.” Noteworthy is the rendering of Kirkjubar as “Kirkby” (p. la),which is a loan word...