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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 86–88.
Published: 01 March 1972
... for each poet by discrepancies be- tween the intellectual principles underlying liis first political assen ts and liis romantic intuitions of organic wholeness” (p. 49), one wonders if he has a workable thesis, regardless of its systeinic attractiveness. Or could it be that the tendency...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1971) 32 (4): 425–428.
Published: 01 December 1971
... aesthetic experience, do not contribute to our understanding 01‘ the causes of that experience in the play, antl do not add substance to Van Laan’s theory of’di-ama.Aside from constantly reminding us of liis particular approach to ii study of tlrama, they serve only to reiterate thc truism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (2): 160–182.
Published: 01 June 1958
... osterreichischen Universitaten 1952-1955 angenommen anglistischen Dissertationem.” Anglia, LXXIV ( 1956), 385-412. (Contains several Arthurian titles.) 4107. Arthos, John. On the Poetry of Spenser and the Form of Romances. 19 56. Rev. by B. E. C. Davis in MLR, LII (1957), 249-250. 4299...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1974) 35 (4): 432–434.
Published: 01 December 1974
... temptations is called for (the discussion of Al- bertine, pp. 151-62), Stambolian seems to me to adhere too closely to Proust’s 4 34 I< EV 1 E ws definition of tlie ideal reader (one who “must seek out liis inner spirit,” etc accepting even...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (2): 207–209.
Published: 01 June 1975
... of social re- new al, wi t h i ts concoin i tan t , rat her i ncongriious anti -in tel lec t 11a 1 ism ;I nd t lic increasingly troubled and fragile t’ziith in the poetic vision, was alniost Iioiirid to generate dissonances antl spli is, given liis own social situation, his instinc- tive...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 83–86.
Published: 01 March 1972
... poetry of the romantics “to 8(i REVIEWS a denionstra tion of the dileiiiina posed for each poet by discrepancies be- tween the intellectual principles underlying liis first political assen ts and liis romantic intuitions of organic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 80–81.
Published: 01 March 1972
... primacy of the sense of vision in the aesthetic experience” (p. lo). Sterne was interested in painting, and in painters, and liis emulation of Ho- garth (liis practice rather than theory) is evident. As for the theoreticians, Holtz links Sterne with Locke and Lessing: ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 473–475.
Published: 01 December 1973
... to tlicir litcrary context seem frequently eitlier straiiicd or ol)vioirs, Iiowevcr in reresting liis discussion of' the use of any par- tiC.tllil1. dctitil 01.01' light itli(l SI~;I~O\V IIKIY k.CVC CIO 110t need t~ hear. ;Il)otlt (:ole or 1)tiraiid or a\llstoii to Iwlicvc that the light...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 81–83.
Published: 01 March 1972
..., and liis emulation of Ho- garth (liis practice rather than theory) is evident. As for the theoreticians, Holtz links Sterne with Locke and Lessing: 82 REVIEWS Underlying the work of all three is a coninion conception of language...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 475–477.
Published: 01 December 1973
... to the visii;il iiiiagc and how it iiitcracts with the sense of detail, his generalizations alx,irt tlicsc IiiittterS in relation to tlicir litcrary context seem frequently eitlier straiiicd or ol)vioirs, Iiowevcr in reresting liis discussion of' the use of any par- tiC.tllil1. dctitil 01.01...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 69–72.
Published: 01 March 1972
... with liis wife after their ghost-haunted banquet lias broken up. In every passage Brown takes up, his close but rarely myopic scrutiny achieves its illumination: notably in liis re- marks on tlie controlled tone of the Prologue to Romeo and Juliet and on the force of the play’s ending (few...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (1): 118–121.
Published: 01 March 1970
..., and Gulliver himself, forced at last to recog- nize that he and liis countrymen are members of the “cursed Race of Yahoos,” adds his own voice to that tradition. Yet Carnochan recognizes the problem raised by Gulliver’s extravagant behavior at the end of the fourth book which the critics of the soft...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (1): 17–36.
Published: 01 March 1948
..., XLVII (May, 1779), 354-62 ; ibid. (June, 1779), 450-53; Donaldson, Elements of Beauty, L (October, 1780), 225-27 ; Warton, History, LII (August, 1781), 108-14 ; Blair, Lectures on Rhetoric, LVI (July, 1783), 45-60 ; Scott, Critical Essays, LX (November, 1785), 349. But see LII (October, 1781...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 479–484.
Published: 01 December 1973
... clarifies scholarly intei-change; Professor 1,egouis is equally direct in liis comments, antl I do not wish to bore the readers of‘ AfLQ by restating iiiy detailed observations yet once more. I appreciate his careful exaniinatioii of‘ niy paper, and rvill observe only that liis objections came...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (3): 280.
Published: 01 September 1956
... to 1079. l’hcse attest liis fairly Reiieral re;idiiigs in ...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (1): 113–114.
Published: 01 March 1967
...). of the Innds(-ape- passage in “This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison” only that “The li?ic.\ are a poetic rendering of the Uerkele)ran doctrine . . .” (1). 49) i.; not otdy inadequate but positively baneful in its confusion of poetry antl i~liilom~~liy. This stage in the discussion of Komantic poetry...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 558–559.
Published: 01 December 1940
.... Yet, Whiting’s book-and this is to me its greatest value--is not primarily a study of sources in the ordinary fashion. Some of the works to which he refers in liis extensive bibliography have been mentioned in scattered notes before, but all the materials have never been so impressively...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (2): 147–159.
Published: 01 June 1958
...: 68XV (May, 1763), 373. 69 XXXI (April, 1771), 297. 7OLV (Feb., 1783), 156; see also LII (Aug., 1781), 159, and LII (Nov., 1781), 398. 71x1 (May, 1761), 394. 79 VII (Jan., 1759), 78; see also I11 (May, 1757), 476. 73 LIV (Aug., 1782), 152; see also VII (Jan., 1759), 79...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 224–237.
Published: 01 June 1948
... and Erikskronika.) Paris : Delamain et Boutelleau, 1947. Rev. by V. S [antoli] in RLM, 11 ( 1947) 327-328. 2545. Bjdgholm, N. The Layamon Texts. 1943. Rev. by A. A. Prins in Museum, LII (1947), 258-260. 2840. Boesch, B. Deutsche Literaturgeschichte in Grundzugen. Bern : Francke, 1946...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 470–473.
Published: 01 December 1973
...<:es. Kawson’s book is largely concerned with secondary meanings, or “iinder- sides,” sirstained by references like the one above to Heart of’ tlark~7e.s~.His thesis applies to, indeed is one explanation for, the moments of greatest in- tensity in Swift, and perhaps also for what he calls .Johnson’s “sadness.” Its subject, however, is Fielding, and not much is said of Joseph Andrews and Tom Jones but ;I p-eat deal almut .Jontithccn Ii’ild, A Joiimcil of‘ci I’oyuge lo t2isDori, arid Amulici. Kesiirrection is a good thing, and Kawson makes no excessive claims as to his works’ over-all quality; lie does find high points in 12ieldiiig’s art, analogoirs to thosc iri Swift’s, in ;I passionate anguish at in- creasingly irnassimilable brute fact. Fielding tlie magistrate seeing the reality of’ 1,ondori lifk, Fielding the man seeing Iiis own dropsical, dying body: I think these are tlie unstated unassinii1al)lc ficts to which Kawson alliicks. ?I’lie effect has been described by others as experience insufficiently assimi- lated, ;I firilure to adjust forni to content, and ii succiiiiibing to sentiniental conveii tions as a way of coping with unac:custoined experience. Kawson’s eniplixis is ;I salutary one, I>ut we are reniinded of’ aesthetic norms wlien lie, very occasionally, refkrs to Pope’s confidence in order as “a little stultifying” (I>. 51). ,Aside ti-oni liis enipliasis on these in tense nionients, and despite illunii- iiating detail and fine analyses, Kawson does not tell us...