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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1946) 7 (4): 503–504.
Published: 01 December 1946
... problem; the more speculative side emphatically remains to be reexamined. HENRYW. WELLS Columbia University The True Text of King Lear. By LEOKIRSCHBAUM. Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins Press, 1945. Pp. ix + 81. $1.75. Mr. Kirschbaum believes that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1948) 9 (3): 357–359.
Published: 01 September 1948
... find useful and illuminating. H. T. SWEDENBERG,JR. University of California, Los Angeles Prefaces to Shakespeare. Volume I: Hamlet, King Lear, The Mer- chant of Venice, Antony and Cleopatra, Cymbeline. By HARLEY GRANVILLE-BARKER.Princeton, New...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1951) 12 (3): 363–364.
Published: 01 September 1951
... Shakespeare‘s King Lear: A Critical Edition. Edited by GEORGEIAN DUTHIE. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1949. Pp. ix 4- 425. $5.50. In his preface, Professor Duthie writes: “The aim of this work is to present the reader with a text of King Lear which will be as near to what Shakespeare wrote as I...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1984) 45 (1): 87–91.
Published: 01 March 1984
...William H. Matchett Stephen Booth. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1983. xi + 183 pp. $16.95. Copyright © 1984 by Duke University Press 1984 WILLIAM H. MATCHETT 87 “King Lear,” “Macbeth,” Indefinition, and Tragedy By...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1984) 45 (4): 327–337.
Published: 01 December 1984
... FIELD ANTONY AND CLEOPATRA IN THE WAKE OF KING LEAR* By WILLIAMH. MATCHETT There are a few literary works so successful-so thorough-that they have exhausted the possibilities in the areas they have ex- plored. Each...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1965) 26 (2): 257–263.
Published: 01 June 1965
...Warren Stevenson Copyright © 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 ALBANY AS ARCHETYPE IN KZNG LEAR By WARRENSTEVENSON A. C. Bradley, upon observing of the character of Albany in King Lear that he is “merely sketched” and as a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1949) 10 (2): 239–240.
Published: 01 June 1949
.... JOHN E. HANKINS University of Kansas This Grcat Stage: Image aptd Structure in King Lear. By ROBERTBECHTOLD HEILMAN.Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1948. Pp. xi + 339. $3.50. The modern study of Shakespeare’s imagery provides us with interesting evidence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1946) 7 (2): 153–174.
Published: 01 June 1946
...Roland M. Smith Copyright © 1946 by Duke University Press 1946 KING LEAR AND THE MERLIN TRADITION By ROLAND&I. SMITH It has been generally believed that the great scenes of King Lear which unfold the madness of Lear, Edgar, and the Fool sprang from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1960) 21 (3): 223–227.
Published: 01 September 1960
...Robert P. Adams Copyright © 1960 by Duke University Press 1960 KING LEAR’S REVENGES By ROBERTP. ADAMS In a play filled with grandeur, meanness, and complexly mysterious insights into the human condition, the passage in which Lear pleads, “0...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1950) 11 (1): 124–125.
Published: 01 March 1950
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2013) 74 (4): 441–463.
Published: 01 December 2013
... “double blessing” that Polonius gives Laertes shows this ritual comically, as do those of earlier sons Launce and Launcelot in The Two Gentlemen of Verona and The Merchant of Venice ; All’s Well That Ends Well renders it confusingly in feudal transition into a new age. King Lear offers it in the peaceful...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1985) 46 (2): 181–190.
Published: 01 June 1985
...John Reibetanz Copyright © 1985 by Duke University Press 1985 1 John L. Murphy. Darkness and Devils: Exorcism and “King Lear.” Athens and London: Ohio University Press, 1984. xii + 267 pp. $26.95. William F. Zak. Sovereign Shame: A Study of “King Lear.” Lewisburg, Pa.: Bucknell...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1964) 25 (3): 346–355.
Published: 01 September 1964
..., according to Kott, is a recognition of the nature of “le Grand Mkcanisme” by one of its victims. Richard I1 is suddenly and brutally confronted with the reality of his situation. King Lear, on the other hand, descends the tragic staircase slowly and only gradually comes to awareness. King Lear...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1967) 28 (2): 192–206.
Published: 01 June 1967
... words and their sounds that comes very close to nonsense a verbal play comparable to that of Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, or Sir W. S. Gilbert. Hopkins loses nothing in the comparison with iis fellow Victorians: play is seldom if ever trivial or meaningless, and it is entirely compatible...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1991) 52 (1): 105–108.
Published: 01 March 1991
... and superficial control of the outward action by a single character, the Halletts’ method obscures what most critics would regard as more important aspects of dramatic action. For example, according to the Halletts, King bar 1.1.53-107 is divided into three beats: “Shakespeare has Lear...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 323–336.
Published: 01 December 1962
... Bishop Orders His Tomb” is an instance of humor only.) I shall try to show that one reason for this is that King Lear, with its “comedy of the grotesque” (to use Vl’ilson Knight’s phrase), is fertilizing Browning’s exceptionally vigorous 1 Quotations from “Childe Roland” and other...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1954) 15 (2): 183–184.
Published: 01 June 1954
... styles have their origin in character. In Lear the images take over their largest role in all the plays; they are more fully integrated into the structure of the drama and have become “more meaningful The main groups of characters are distinguished by imagery habits, and imagery is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1972) 33 (3): 335–337.
Published: 01 September 1972
... to read on to the end. Yet in this the ordinary reader will be mistaken, while the reviewer and the scholar will find their patience rewarded. For the chapter that is most worth reading is the last-that on King Lear-which is aptly entitled “The Limits of Nobility-Everything and Nothing,” though...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1979) 40 (4): 415–417.
Published: 01 December 1979
... fine utterance of harmony, critical as well as theatrical. The final scenes to which he is particularly attentive in three long chapters are those of Hamlet, King Lear, and both Othello and Antony and Cleopatra. If this selection seems a bit thin-why not Macbeth? and why treat Othello merely as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1949) 10 (2): 237–239.
Published: 01 June 1949
.... In addition to the Roman plays, Lear, Macbeth, and Cymbcline are excluded from the group, though these last are based upon the same chron- icles from which the “histories” were drawn. Miss Campbell explains the dis- tinction as one of purpose. Illustrating from Spenser’s Letter to Raleigh...