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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1940) 1 (3): 420–421.
Published: 01 September 1940
.... Beginning with Kyd he follows the course of revenge tragedy through four well-marked periods, the charac- teristics of which are indicated by four chapter headings: “The School of Kyd,” “Interlude : The Reign of the Villain,” “The Dis- approval of Revenge,” and “The Decadence of Revenge Tragedy...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1949) 10 (2): 153–157.
Published: 01 June 1949
...” had come to symbolize all that was evil and repulsive, yet mysterious and attrac- tive, in Renaissance Italy. It was a convenient tag and good theater, and men like Kyd and Marlowe capitalized upon it. With the name they combined two traditions which were a part of the dramatic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 December 1949
... only concerned here, he tells us, in searching for “trends” in the more flam- boyant aspects of the “baroque” feeling for life. In the heroic figures of Mar- lowe, Chapman, Webster, and Jonson he finds a common “exaggerated dynamic of the will”; in Kyd’s Hieronimo and in Marston’s Antonio...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1987) 48 (2): 186–188.
Published: 01 June 1987
... readers, however, who will find in McAlindon’s chapters-one apiece on Kyd, Marlowe, Tourneur, Webster, and Middleton-a nearly played-out critical vein from which they have little to gain. I owe my sense of this polarization in the profession to recent experience at scholarly conferences and wish...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 399–400.
Published: 01 December 1962
... first six chapters which seek to establish the canons of Greene, Marlowe, Peele, and Kyd for the purpose of reconstructing the relation- ship of certain debated plays to Shakespeare’s early dramatic career. The author supplies a useful addendum to his “Organization and Personnel’’ by...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 400–401.
Published: 01 December 1962
... aesthetic assumptions are not defended, but they inform the first six chapters which seek to establish the canons of Greene, Marlowe, Peele, and Kyd for the purpose of reconstructing the relation- ship of certain debated plays to Shakespeare’s early dramatic career. The author supplies a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1963) 24 (2): 207–209.
Published: 01 June 1963
... “apparently did everything the adults did,” because “the dramatic simplicity of the time imposed few, if any, limitations on their activities.” But with the needs of such playwrights as Marlowe, Kyd, and Greene, “the children’s limitations became readily apparent.” It was “obvious” that however...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1940) 1 (4): 553–555.
Published: 01 December 1940
... a welcome corrective to overmuch theorizing, but there are times when one wishes for a more decisive stand. Parts of the treatment of Poley, Frizer, Skeres, Kyd, Richard Baines, and Sir Walter Raleigh’s circle in their relation to Marlmve are re-assertions, often without verbal change...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 528–531.
Published: 01 December 1949
... figures of Mar- lowe, Chapman, Webster, and Jonson he finds a common “exaggerated dynamic of the will”; in Kyd’s Hieronimo and in Marston’s Antonio, “exaggerated sensi- bility” ; in the philosophical D’Amville, “parodoxid eccentricity”-in all of these characterizations a trend toward the “art...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1965) 26 (2): 334–338.
Published: 01 June 1965
... of Kyd and Marlowe as “simple” writers. The high position Tomlinson would accord to Tourneur comes from the blending in this writer’s work of a moral condemnation of sin with a seeming delight in lechery and corruption. Sin itself becomes the source of vitality and life, and Tomlinson finds...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1940) 1 (2): 245–248.
Published: 01 June 1940
... appear in its most characteristic form earlier than the middle years of the 1580’s when Marlowe’s Fausfus brought the “practising magician” on the stage for the first time and Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy began the native tradition in the treatment of ghosts. (P. 57.) Mr. West finds that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1974) 35 (4): 352–363.
Published: 01 December 1974
... (III.iii.1-42). By the time of Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy (ca. 1585) and Marlowe’s daring explorations into the actualities of power in the great state, however, I suggest that politicized audiences had emerged in England, certainly in London. These popular audiences were intensely inter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1969) 30 (1): 161–168.
Published: 01 March 1969
... Conrad and Warrington Dawson: The Record of a Friendship. Durham: Duke University Press, 1968. xv + 242 pp. $10.00. Ross, Thomas W. (editor). Thomas Kyd: “The Spanish Tragedy.” Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, Fountainwell Drama Text, Vol. 6, 1968. 128 pp...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2000) 61 (3): 431–462.
Published: 01 September 2000
... equating author with murderer, however, Hieronimo does more than indicate a nascent desire for authorship and an attendant frustra- 1 Thomas Kyd The Spanish Tragedy, ed. J. R. Mulryne, 2d ed. (London: Black; New York: Norton, 1989), 2.4.102. The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1978) 39 (4): 331–362.
Published: 01 December 1978
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1960) 21 (4): 315–320.
Published: 01 December 1960
... by the word. Certainly, in Tuunburluine, there are few, if any, of the “shocking” trivialities of the Baines note and the Kyd letter ; yet the play does imply a conception of man so unorthodox that an Elizabethan might be excused for branding it as “atheist.” The very form of the word...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1967) 28 (4): 413–425.
Published: 01 December 1967
... segge” (2518), another substantial parallel is created-Gawain’s single concealed sash worn in guilt and the brotherhood’s multiple sashes worn in joy. In effect, the Christian knights share, rather than judge, Gawain’s experience. For “be renoun of be Rounde Table” (2519) these “most kyd...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1942) 3 (2): 263–285.
Published: 01 June 1942
... earliest extant venture with serious drama, derives from the current theatrical formulae fashioned by Mar- lowe and by Kyd. Several other matters, too, deserve serious con- sideration. Besides the development and the progression which the theater, as well as the age itself, had undergone...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1976) 37 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 March 1976
...” (17 1-72), a no- tion so much at odds with Shakespeare’s plot that T. s. Eliot and others have seen it as an inartistic carry-over from sources-for Sax0 Gramma- ticus’s Amleth, like Hieronymus in Kyd’s Spanish Tragedy, feigns madness to disarm suspicions. But Hamlet’s “antic disposition...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1979) 40 (3): 237–255.
Published: 01 September 1979
.... L. (London, 1568); Torquato Tasso; [The Householder’s] Philosophie, trans. Thomas Kyd (London, 1588); and Robert Cleaver, A Godly Form of HourehoMe Couernement (London, 1598). Little has been written about Tudor domestic literature, and what has been written still JOHN C. BEAN...