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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1963) 24 (1): 13–20.
Published: 01 March 1963
...Bruce M. Johnson Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 CONRAD’S “KARAIN” AND LORD JIM By BRUCEM. JOHNSON More than a year before beginning what he thought would be a short piece called “Tuan Jim : A Sketch,” Joseph Conrad had written an...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1989) 50 (1): 38–57.
Published: 01 March 1989
.... 241. 42 ZORA NEALE HURSTON man in her life who tries to thwart her growth and restrict her freedom,just as Jim restricts Arvay (Hemenway, p. 3 12). The subversive undertow of Seraph on the Suwanee exists on every page, although Hurston’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1974) 35 (1): 95–98.
Published: 01 March 1974
... be true of many of these models, that they are predicated on some notion of human “essence,” on some conception that man has been meant to be something. She is apparently confusing my use of “ordained” to describe some of Lord Jim’s attitudes toward self with quite a different discussion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1971) 32 (1): 89–106.
Published: 01 March 1971
... Jim Latter in the political trilogy. As he watches Edward operate, Tom becomes increasingly disenchanted with politics. At the height of his success, Edward seems dehumanized and cynical. His egocentric amorality contrasts with Tom’s loyalty and steadfastness. Tom’s remark that all Edward...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1986) 47 (4): 447–449.
Published: 01 December 1986
... Marlow as narrator and both contemplating, in the histories of Kurtz and Jim, very different ver- sions of Western imperialism. The challenge for a political criticism of Conrad is to relate the apparent apology for colonialism in LordJim to its scathing denunciation in Heart of Darkness. But...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1973) 34 (1): 85–97.
Published: 01 March 1973
..., this time a quixotic seaman with a burden of guilt, whose experience would echo in Conrad’s memoirs. Jim’s “keen percep- . . . tion of the Intolerable drove him away for good ” (chap. 1). Three books lately published explore Conrad’s recurring...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1983) 44 (2): 157–177.
Published: 01 June 1983
... White-in Huckleberry Finn,” in Form and Fable iii Aniericnn Fiction (New York: Oxford University Press, 1961), pp. 3 17-42; Chadwick Hansen, “The Character of Jim and the Ending of Huckleberry Finn,” MR, 5 (1963), 45-66; Maxwell Geisniar, Mark Twain: An American Prophet (Boston: Houghton Mifflin...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2009) 70 (1): 147–161.
Published: 01 March 2009
... pre- 1843 minstrelsy but also on class. See Cockrell; Gary D. Engle, ed., This Grotesque Essence: Plays from the American Minstrel Stage (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State Univer- sity Press, 1978); W. T. Lhamon Jr., Jump Jim Crow: Lost Plays, Lyrics, and Street Prose of the First Atlantic Popular...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1992) 53 (2): 257–259.
Published: 01 June 1992
... contemporary women: Stein’s “Melanctha”and The Niger of the “Narcissus”; 258 REVIEWS Woolf’s The Voyage Out and Heart of Darkness, Chopin’s The Awakening and Lord Jim. The doublings are at times inspired. The Voyage Out and Heart of Darkness...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1970) 31 (4): 474–491.
Published: 01 December 1970
...,” Sci- ence, March 29, 1968. pp. 1448-49; and John Lear, “Heredity ‘Transactions,” Saturday Review, March 16, 1968, pp. 36, 86. Both of these are rightly piit down in the review of six reviews by Guniher Stent, “\Vhat They Are Saying about Honest Jim,” Quarterly Review of Biology, 43 (1968...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1994) 55 (4): 345–382.
Published: 01 December 1994
... as Stein in Joseph Conrad’s Lord Jim or Creighton in Rudyard Kipling’s Kim, make explicit the naturalist’s and ethnologist’s assump- tion of the sorcerer’s power and insight. In Stoker’s Dracula Dr. van Helsing (like Stein, a moody German with fractured English) wields the beneficent force...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1963) 24 (3): 253–256.
Published: 01 September 1963
... “howling adventures amongst the Injuns. . . .” Jim tells Huck that, now that his father is dead, he does have the money. But he will, however, have to claim it himself. The mat- ter of the money and the “howling adventures” is then dropped. Since Tom is “most well” now, Huck says, there “ain’t...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1977) 38 (2): 206–207.
Published: 01 June 1977
... readers of this book will find most to object to. A few interpretations strike me as “stretchers,” and I suspect most readers who know Huckleberry Finn well would find others. For example, Carrington argues that “Huck makes Jim pay and pay” (p. 41) for pressuring Huck to remain loyal; and he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1978) 39 (2): 207–208.
Published: 01 June 1978
..., featureless petrification of his everyday life into a more vital form of existence” (p. 125). Stiller uses the story of Jim White’s descent into the Carlsbad Caverns “as a convenient metaphor for the narrator’s descent into the deepest layers of his consciousness” (pp. 60-61). According to Butler...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1964) 25 (2): 227–228.
Published: 01 June 1964
... critics, does not receive the full analysis that one would expect. It is perhaps inevitable that a reading of some of the other novels from this political perspective is not equally fruitful. In the discussion of Lord Jim and Heart of Darkness, the emphasis upon the public, political aspect...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1973) 34 (2): 180–190.
Published: 01 June 1973
... subtle, expansive meditations-vast tropes-on time, memory, and art. Works of elegiac romance vary greatly not only in length, but in setting, character, and tone as well. Some are novels of exotic ad- venture, such as Heart of Darkness, Lord Jim, and Moby-Dick. Others run to the conventions...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2000) 61 (2): 287–358.
Published: 01 June 2000
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1984) 45 (3): 308–311.
Published: 01 September 1984
... readings of major fictions- “Heart of Darkness,” Lord Jim, The Great Gatsby, The Good Soldier, All the King’s Men, and Doctor Faustus (an isolated Continental example, but worthy of a place)- make a strong stab at canonically establishing what every reader of modern fiction has been aware of but...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2014) 75 (1): 57–75.
Published: 01 March 2014
... and the Case of Romantic Historicism . Chicago : University of Chicago Press . Conrad Joseph . 1986 . Lord Jim . London : Penguin . Curtius Ernst Robert . 1991 . European Literature and the Latin Middle Ages , translated by Trask Willard R. . Princeton, NJ : Princeton...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2006) 67 (3): 397–400.
Published: 01 September 2006
...: University of Georgia Press, 2003. xii + 225 pp. Since Leslie Fiedler’s unavoidably influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have agreed that the relationship between Huck and Jim at the center of Mark Twain’s most celebrated novel...