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ishmael

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 172–176.
Published: 01 June 1963
... work. One ,critic who does recognize the difference between the London edition and the Harper version rationalizes the change in the follow- ing manner: “Ishmael survives, you may say, because someone had to live to tell the story-an explanation which is not only vulgar but which also...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (4): 337–352.
Published: 01 December 1962
... own intellectual and artistic needs. He was thus able to find in Fuller an organizing idea for White Jacket.g More important, his active reading of the Holy State provided one basis for his account of the relation between Queequeg and Ishmael, a point of departure for the powerful description...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 181–186.
Published: 01 June 1964
... of the author’s conception and the force of Ishmael’s response. Blackmur is right in saying that only “the ordinary exigencies of life on a whaling ship provided drama” and that “Melville had no talent for making his dramatic scenes objective except by aid of external and unrelated force.“2...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 237–244.
Published: 01 September 1963
... to make the Adamic elements of Typee and Redburn an organic part of the con- summate craftsmanship of Moby-Dick. Closer still to the central meanings of Moby-Dick are the allusions to Marlowe’s Faust, to Milton’s Satan, and to the biblical Ishmael. All these mythic figures appear...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (2): 118–127.
Published: 01 June 1956
..., for the opening words of his next book (Moby-Dick) are “Call me Ishmael.” In Moby-Dick the recurrent image, hitherto delectable, becomes a shape of death-a coffin or a whale; but whereas the delectable image threatened death, the threatening image carries life in its belly, Life-in-Death. Immersed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (2): 180–190.
Published: 01 June 1973
... Sebastian’s rudeness and indif- ference without complaint. His one-way “life-long affection” for Sebastian, “which somehow or other had always been crushed and thwarted” (p. 33), is typical of the relationship between narrator and hero in elegiac romance. It reflects the relationship between Ishmael...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (1): 99–104.
Published: 01 March 1941
... includes one of his most sinister and graphic figures, the squatter Ishmael Bush. If it includes the conventional pair of heroines and the usual jejune love story, it also unrolls an exciting and moving narrative against one of Cooper’s widest canvases. Several scenes and incidents, moreover...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 218–219.
Published: 01 June 1952
... and the Search; he shows that Ishmael the dis- inherited son and Prometheus the creative culture hero and a false Prometheus or betrayer do occur in numerous guises-in persons, groups, nations; that a polarity between mountain and valley, light and dark, space and time, fire and stone, withdrawal...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 206–208.
Published: 01 June 1972
..., at the prospect of Hawthorne compressed into a continuity with George Washington Harris and Henry Clay Lewis; or at the guideposts to Melville’s “descent to faith” planted by the author in “the comedy of love” of Queequeg and Ishmael (p. 101) and in “the jokes in Billy Budd” (pp. 130-32). Finally...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (3): 350–353.
Published: 01 September 2019
... to the remains of seventeenth-century religion: the unshakeable “imagination of a kind of otherness” and an attendant sense of moral accountability (150, 144). Ahab proved too intractable to acknowledge that experience had outgrown the Calvinist uniform into which he was determined to stuff it. But Ishmael...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (3): 308–311.
Published: 01 September 1984
... and certainly presents an observant narrator, but where is Ishmael’s hero worship and loss? (And how can we seriously compare the narrator’s function in regard DANIEL T. O’HARA 311 to the poor protagonist of “Bartleby the ScrivenerReniemhrunce of Things...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (1): 54–66.
Published: 01 March 1972
... PARKER 59 which Elizabeth S. Foster might never have written, to judge from his treatment. There are a good handful of misreadings and misstatements scattered about the book. The statement that in one voice Ishmael offers “a smug recommendation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (3): 295–298.
Published: 01 September 1976
... that ‘‘Ishmael as dramatized first- person narrator soon becomes absorbed into the larger omniscient vision of the novel”; luckily for us, “the inconsistency is not troublesome” (p. 13). (So much for a complex subject on which critics like Walter E. Bezanson and Robert Martin Adams have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1994) 55 (1): 79–106.
Published: 01 March 1994
... HistOriCimr and Other Old-Fashioned Tspics. He is working on “American Literary Realism and the Failed Promise of Contract.” Thomas I Nature of Subaltern Opposition 81 There are few better expressions of the synecdochical ideal of democ- racy than Ishmael’s celebration...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (1): 136–141.
Published: 01 March 1970
... His- tory”; John Stafford, “Sympathy Comes to America”; Everett Carter, “The Typicality of Oliver Wendell Holmes”; Carl Bode, “Thoreau and the Bor- rowed Reeds”; Howard P. Vincent, “Ishmael, Writer and Art Critic”; Merton M. Sealts, Jr., “Melville’s Chimney...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 317–324.
Published: 01 September 1950
...-the unknown. Moby Dick, the White Whale, had to be killed if the tragic crew of the Pequod were to find rest. Ishmael (Melville) speaks of white in these terms : It was the whiteness of the whale that above all things appalled me. But how can I hope to explain myself here; and yet, in some...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 255–258.
Published: 01 June 2003
... for making Melville palatable and read- able throughout the early and middle decades of the twentieth century: (1) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 258–260.
Published: 01 June 2003
... for making Melville palatable and read- able throughout the early and middle decades of the twentieth century: (1) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 260–265.
Published: 01 June 2003
... for making Melville palatable and read- able throughout the early and middle decades of the twentieth century: (1) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2003) 64 (2): 266–269.
Published: 01 June 2003
... for making Melville palatable and read- able throughout the early and middle decades of the twentieth century: (1) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2...