1-20 of 65 Search Results for

ishmael

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1963) 24 (2): 172–176.
Published: 01 June 1963
... difference between the London edition and the Harper version rationalizes the change in the follow- ing manner: “Ishmael survives, you may say, because someone had to live to tell the story-an explanation which is not only vulgar but which also does not explain since Melville could have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1964) 25 (2): 181–186.
Published: 01 June 1964
... of the author’s conception and the force of Ishmael’s response. Blackmur is right in saying that only “the ordinary exigencies of life on a whaling ship provided drama” and that “Melville had no talent for making his dramatic scenes objective except by aid of external and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 337–352.
Published: 01 December 1962
... own intellectual and artistic needs. He was thus able to find in Fuller an organizing idea for White Jacket.g More important, his active reading of the Holy State provided one basis for his account of the relation between Queequeg and Ishmael, a point of departure for the powerful description...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1963) 24 (3): 237–244.
Published: 01 September 1963
... Marlowe’s Faust, to Milton’s Satan, and to the biblical Ishmael. All these mythic figures appear in Melville’s earlier work. The first mention of the unsatisfied savant is in Chapter 13 of Mardi: “Doctor Faust saw the devil ; but you have seen the ‘Devil Fish.’ ” Melville had not yet realized...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1956) 17 (2): 118–127.
Published: 01 June 1956
...- tion that he is saved. On the contrary, that is confirmed, for the opening words of his next book (Moby-Dick) are “Call me Ishmael.” In Moby-Dick the recurrent image, hitherto delectable, becomes a shape of death-a coffin or a whale; but whereas the delectable image threatened death, the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1952) 13 (2): 218–219.
Published: 01 June 1952
... he emerges with certain persistent ideas and symbols which do seem to be fundamentally sig- nificant in Melville’s writing. He gives interesting evidence of a preoccupation with such themes as the Fall and the Search; he shows that Ishmael the dis- inherited son and Prometheus the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1973) 34 (2): 180–190.
Published: 01 June 1973
... elegiac romance. It reflects the relationship between Ishmael and Ahab, between Marlow and Jim, between Seurel and Meaulnes, Dowel1 and Ashburnham. This one-way relationship, furthermore, is similar to both Sebastian’s “first adolescent romance” and his “last dark love” (p. 137). All of these...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1972) 33 (2): 206–208.
Published: 01 June 1972
... I do, at the prospect of Hawthorne compressed into a continuity with George Washington Harris and Henry Clay Lewis; or at the guideposts to Melville’s “descent to faith” planted by the author in “the comedy of love” of Queequeg and Ishmael (p. 101) and in “the jokes in Billy Budd” (pp. 130...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1941) 2 (1): 99–104.
Published: 01 March 1941
... the author’s deadliest bores, Obed Bat, it also includes one of his most sinister and graphic figures, the squatter Ishmael Bush. If it includes the conventional pair of heroines and the usual jejune love story, it also unrolls an exciting and moving narrative against one of Cooper’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1976) 37 (3): 295–298.
Published: 01 September 1976
...” (p. 12). We are told that ‘‘Ishmael as dramatized first- person narrator soon becomes absorbed into the larger omniscient vision of the novel”; luckily for us, “the inconsistency is not troublesome” (p. 13). (So much for a complex subject on which critics like Walter E. Bezanson and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1984) 45 (3): 308–311.
Published: 01 September 1984
...- teenth-century works: Moby-Dick may enact demystification and certainly presents an observant narrator, but where is Ishmael’s hero worship and loss? (And how can we seriously compare the narrator’s function in regard DANIEL T. O’HARA 311 to the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1972) 33 (1): 54–66.
Published: 01 March 1972
... PARKER 59 which Elizabeth S. Foster might never have written, to judge from his treatment. There are a good handful of misreadings and misstatements scattered about the book. The statement that in one voice Ishmael offers “a smug recommendation of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1965) 26 (3): 486–493.
Published: 01 September 1965
.... Blair, John G. The Poetic Art of W. H. Auden. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965. vii + 210 pp. $4.50; 36s. Brodtkorb, Paul, Jr. Ishmael's White World: A Phenomenological Reading of Moby Dick. New Haven and London:+ Yale University Press, Yale Publications , in American...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1988) 49 (2): 200–207.
Published: 01 June 1988
... pp. $45.00. Martin, Reginald. Ishmael Reed and the New Black Aesthetic Critics. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988. ix + 120 pp. $29.95. Mizruchi, Susan R. The Power of Historical Knowledge: Narrating the Past in Hawthorne, James, and Dreiser. Princeton: Princeton University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1970) 31 (1): 136–141.
Published: 01 March 1970
... American Literary His- tory”; John Stafford, “Sympathy Comes to America”; Everett Carter, “The Typicality of Oliver Wendell Holmes”; Carl Bode, “Thoreau and the Bor- rowed Reeds”; Howard P. Vincent, “Ishmael, Writer and Art Critic”; Merton M. Sealts, Jr., “Melville’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1950) 11 (3): 317–324.
Published: 01 September 1950
... unorthodox. To Melville white was evil, harsh, ugly-the unknown. Moby Dick, the White Whale, had to be killed if the tragic crew of the Pequod were to find rest. Ishmael (Melville) speaks of white in these terms : It was the whiteness of the whale that above all things appalled me. But...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2003) 64 (2): 255–258.
Published: 01 June 2003
...) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2) the myth of “the author’s” ostensible “conversion to terminal humility” (100), whereby Melville comes to distance himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2003) 64 (2): 258–260.
Published: 01 June 2003
...) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2) the myth of “the author’s” ostensible “conversion to terminal humility” (100), whereby Melville comes to distance himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2003) 64 (2): 260–265.
Published: 01 June 2003
...) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2) the myth of “the author’s” ostensible “conversion to terminal humility” (100), whereby Melville comes to distance himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2003) 64 (2): 266–269.
Published: 01 June 2003
...) disengagement of a moderate, judicious Ishmael from an evidently crazed and dangerous Ahab, demonized into a Hitleresque demagogue of the untrustworthy and unruly lower orders; and (2) the myth of “the author’s” ostensible “conversion to terminal humility” (100), whereby Melville comes to distance himself...