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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (3): 253–256.
Published: 01 September 1963
...Roy Harvey Pearce Copyright © 1963 by Duke University Press 1963 “THE END. YOURS TRULY, HUCK FINN” POSTSCRIPT By ROYHARVEY PEARCE In the last chapter of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck speaks twice of going...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1983) 44 (2): 157–177.
Published: 01 June 1983
... of spontaneity is the prevailing assumption that Huckleberry Finn is an improvised creation, like many Romantic docu- ments before it a “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings.” Twain himself fosters this as~umption.~But while he presents the novel, in Huck’s voice and in the famous first notice...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (3): 413–418.
Published: 01 September 1999
... on followed and shored up one another’s misinterpretations in order to idolize Twain’s novel. In this way they generated a chauvinist misreading of Huck’s moral transformation that brooked no (black) dissent, tacitly alleging that their method was one of “the functions of criticism in our time.” Arac...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 206–207.
Published: 01 June 1977
... with Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn at the Phelps farm. He argues that in the chaotic, turbulent world of the novel, the characters (particularly Huck) do not act according to precon- ceived or innate principles; they react to the situations in which they find themselves. His reading of the book...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 397–400.
Published: 01 September 2006
... 2006 To Hell and Back: Race and Betrayal in the Southern Novel. By Jeff Abernathy. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2003. xii + 225 pp. Since Leslie Fiedler’s unavoidably influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 400–404.
Published: 01 September 2006
.... Since Leslie Fiedler’s unavoidably influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have agreed that the relationship between Huck and Jim at the center of Mark Twain’s most celebrated novel has something archetypal to say — or, at least...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 404–407.
Published: 01 September 2006
... influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have agreed that the relationship between Huck and Jim at the center of Mark Twain’s most celebrated novel has something archetypal to say — or, at least, has been made to have something...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 408–411.
Published: 01 September 2006
... influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have agreed that the relationship between Huck and Jim at the center of Mark Twain’s most celebrated novel has something archetypal to say — or, at least, has been made to have something...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 411–416.
Published: 01 September 2006
... 2006 To Hell and Back: Race and Betrayal in the Southern Novel. By Jeff Abernathy. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2003. xii + 225 pp. Since Leslie Fiedler’s unavoidably influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2006) 67 (3): 416–418.
Published: 01 September 2006
... influential essay “Come Back to the Raft Ag’in, Huck Honey!” appeared in 1948, scholars of U.S. literature have agreed that the relationship between Huck and Jim at the center of Mark Twain’s most celebrated novel has something archetypal to say — or, at least, has been made to have something...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2000) 61 (2): 287–358.
Published: 01 June 2000
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (2): 207–210.
Published: 01 June 1977
... of this book will find most to object to. A few interpretations strike me as “stretchers,” and I suspect most readers who know Huckleberry Finn well would find others. For example, Carrington argues that “Huck makes Jim pay and pay” (p. 41) for pressuring Huck to remain loyal; and he asserts...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 327–332.
Published: 01 June 1965
... of honest effort.” Tom Sawyer’s dream is “to dis- cover buried treasure, to perform a self-sacrificial act for love of his beloved, to save a life, to triumph over his enemy.” In Huckleberry Finn, Huck “searches for an ideal society founded upon the freedom that grows out of moral responsibility...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (1): 1–36.
Published: 01 March 1991
...” “posted” at the beginning of the work- itself sending a shot of hyperbole in the direction of ironic self-inca- pacitation. But Huck’s ethical life does proceed under the aegis of a half-abandoned boy who, in Rousseauist fashion, meets most of his ethical tests in the processive confrontation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (2): 115–124.
Published: 01 June 1961
..., the Duke and the Dauphin, Colonel Sherburn, even the men who float twenty-dollar gold pieces down to Huck-these and many others come through in what is startling fullness when we recall Moll’s narrative. Of all the characters in Moll Flanders, husbands, lovers, relatives, 124...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (4): 403–404.
Published: 01 December 1976
... the article may tell us something a little sur- prising about that era of hard-nosed historical scholarship, especially since it was John Livingston Lowes at whom the neophyte was taking dead aim. But more to the point is the Huck Finn ironic innocence with which we are The third...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 531–532.
Published: 01 December 1949
... and conflict, and which in turn influenced the chronicles (especially the melodramatic incidents in The French Chronicle of London). By the way, this chronicle got the wrong Queen Eleanor, though it was hardly as genially befuddled as Huck Finn’s notion that Henry VIII ordered Jane Shore...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 532–533.
Published: 01 December 1949
...,” which was more ready to assign motives and conflict, and which in turn influenced the chronicles (especially the melodramatic incidents in The French Chronicle of London). By the way, this chronicle got the wrong Queen Eleanor, though it was hardly as genially befuddled as Huck Finn’s notion...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 209–219.
Published: 01 June 1970
... to the dictates of his own nature. The Yankee’s most famous philosophical oration denies that a Huck Finn could exist: r-.1 raining--training is everything; training is all there is to a person. We speak of nature; it is folly; there is no such thing as nature; what we call...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (2): 212–216.
Published: 01 June 1978
...- versity of California Press, 1978. xiii + 397 pp. $14.95. Reiss, Hans. The Writer’s Task ji-om Nietzsche to Brecht. Totowa, N.J.: Kowman aiid Littldield, 1978. xiv + 221 pp. ?i19.50. Scheid, Judith K. “Enfant Terrible” of Contemporary East German Drama: Peter Hucks in His Role as Adaptor...