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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 45–60.
Published: 01 March 1944
... of Chicago, 1926). 2 The Jew-Host story consists of two essential elements, the anti-Jewish and the purely doctrinal, and stories containing one or the other of these elements are found as far back as the second and third centuries A.D. It is interesting to note that the earliest claims...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (1): 79–82.
Published: 01 March 1986
..., the term Exillilerutur conceals a host of personal dramas often fraught with the pathos of cultural isolation or material hardships. It is this markedly individual side of the exilic experience in Switzerland on the part of Thomas Mann, Mud, Kaiser, and Brecht that Kieser investigates in all its...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 298–307.
Published: 01 September 1970
... TuZe,l most critics since Ralph Baldwin2 have agreed that the Parson’s answer to the Host’s call to “knytte up we1 a greet mateere” (X.28)3 makes a suitable finish for the Canterbury Tales. Penance, however besmirched its motives, is the final reason for pil- grimage; and the interposing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1991) 52 (3): 225–261.
Published: 01 September 1991
...] frights English out of his wits” (2.1.138-39), and Ford’s promise to the Welsh schoolmaster at the end (“I will never mistrust my wife again, till thou art able to woo her in good English” C5.5.133-341). The play is also full of translations and mock translations. The Host of the Garter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (4): 431–458.
Published: 01 December 1940
... as literal comment) expands this statement with per- suasive eloquence : On the further bench of the tavern the pardoner remains still seated. There enter Chaucer, the knight, the squire, the friar, the host-old acquaintances. We are by ourselves, no one need be afraid of speaking...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (4): 367–376.
Published: 01 December 1961
...,” Quod this Somonour, “and I bishrewe me, But if I telle tales two or thre Of freres.. . . For we1 I woot thy pacience is gon.” (844-49) As the Host restores peace at this point, it would seem that the Sum- moner’s patience...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (3): 199–203.
Published: 01 September 1956
.... Final preparation of the manuscript and the proofreading have been handled by the editorial staff of the MLQ. 1 The classic statement is by Francis J. Child: “Spenser confounds Sabaoth (hosts) with Sabbath (rest). He obviously means the latter only: all things are to rest eternally...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (1): 3–16.
Published: 01 March 1962
... of Gawain’s test. In Fit One and Fit Four, Gawain and the Green Knight meet for the beheading test; in Fit Three, Gawain undergoes the temptation of the host’s wife. Fit Two, which is largely transitional, includes the journey that links the beheading test and the preliminaries of the temptation...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 387–391.
Published: 01 September 2021
... a purview defined by curiosity and open-mindedness rather than by any national border, generic classification, or linguistic distinction. The list of literatures, language, and contexts beyond English is extensive. My surely incomplete search turned up not only a host of national literatures but also many...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (3): 227–240.
Published: 01 September 1984
... himself as “le bon hoste” (1 2355) or “mon bon hoste” (1 01 67, 20799, 29479). Jesus the host who comes to save his friends should be served devotedly in return. Mary Magdalene recognizes this fact after her conversion from sin, when she muses upon how she can best serve him, for “qui le sert est...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 539–540.
Published: 01 December 1949
... work is shifted to “an evaluation of the effect of imitation and notoriety upon the interpretation” of Werther itself. In the past most of our knowledge of Werther fame has been based on the host of Werther novels, rather exclusively by mediocrities, that sprang up here and everywhere...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2020) 81 (2): 139–167.
Published: 01 June 2020
... firmly avows his vision of the heavenly host of Isaiah and Revelation in the daily sunrise, the frame of the question comes from an alternative prophetic tradition that may even introduce a hint of uncertainty into this moment of prophetic enthusiasm. Blake sees like Isaiah, glimpsing the hem...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 540–541.
Published: 01 December 1949
... of Werther fame has been based on the host of Werther novels, rather exclusively by mediocrities, that sprang up here and everywhere. The limitation of Mr. Atkins’ study to poetry and drama is qualitatively more important and leads to a quite different literary history of the subject...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2019) 80 (1): 106–108.
Published: 01 March 2019
... shows how Russian literature complicated the guest-host relationship and the notion of authentic nationality it entailed. In the case of Gogol’s novel, the performance of hospitality always contains some horrifying excess that, like a fly in the soup, calls into question both the praiseworthiness...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1958) 19 (1): 3–20.
Published: 01 March 1958
... apparent to the Host as the silent Erasmus’ must have been to his companions. Socially as well as physically, distance obscures details, and in any circle the vulgar mind tends to reduce to types the individuals who move in other circles. The Host saw not the reality before his eyes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1964) 25 (2): 153–170.
Published: 01 June 1964
... the yearly punishment of the fallen host (X.566). The pattern is repeated in various ways in every subsidiary mode of Hell from polemical debate to the experience of the first explorers. The experience of infernal philosophers is typical : In discourse more sweet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (3): 247–257.
Published: 01 September 1955
... with the Father’s authority and power, sets forth to rout the rebellious hosts of Satan is closely modeled on Ezekiel. Milton “has worked in detail after detail of the Scriptural original,” says A. W. Verity; ‘‘Paradise Lost contains no more striking instance of his skill in 1 Cf., e.g., Carl H...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1951) 12 (3): 267–285.
Published: 01 September 1951
... domestic scene of Heavenly Guest with host and hostess sitting down on their mossy seats and falling to the viands with hungry relish, Wesley must have regarded these lines as frivolous or in bad taste-and out they went. . . . So down they sat...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 333–341.
Published: 01 December 1963
... is “wener hen Wenore,” as evidence that she is morally superior to Guinevere. The line merely states that she is prettier. Her conduct in the narrative, if we take it literally rather than as a necessary role in the comedy of testing the hero’s loyalty to his host, is highly immoral...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (4): 344–359.
Published: 01 December 1955
... ruisseaux hostes de la prairie, Herbes ny fleurs, ny oposC rocher Ne la scauroient engarder de moucher, BThe most probable source is, perhaps, Iliad XIV, 414-20, or XIII, 178-81, which contain the full image of the falling warrior compared to the stricken oak...