1-20 of 753 Search Results for

heaven

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1951) 12 (3): 364–366.
Published: 01 September 1951
...-spelling features of the text are not as yet definitive and will require further bibliographical investigation before a number of points and minor readings can be settled. FREDSONBOWERS University of Virginia Joseph Hall’s “Heaven...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1959) 20 (4): 307–314.
Published: 01 December 1959
...Doris M. Alexander Copyright © 1959 by Duke University Press 1959 EUGENE O’NEILL, “THE HOUND OF HEAVEN,” AND THE “HELL HOLE” By DORISM. ALEXANDER “Some one’s got to go and rake Gene out of the Hell Hole was the usual decision of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2010) 71 (3): 229–269.
Published: 01 September 2010
...David Quint Milton tightly structures book 3 of Paradise Lost around analogies and distinctions between divine and solar light, the invisible heaven beheld by the poet's blind faith in the book's first half and the visible universe and sun visited by Satan in its second, vision down and up the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1962) 23 (1): 17–19.
Published: 01 March 1962
... : an earth which hangs like an apple from heaven and a hell remote from both heaven and earth. Besides being consistent with beliefs presented in The Christian Doctrine,’ the extramundane location of Milton’s hell provides imagery vital for conveying Milton’s attitude toward both Satan and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1949) 10 (4): 534.
Published: 01 December 1949
... epic conception. Chapter 4, “The Middle Epic Shift of the War in Heaven,” advances the no less startling theory that originally the war in Heaven and the creation were neither related by Raphael nor in their present positions, but in chronological order. Section 25 of Chapter 5 offers a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1984) 45 (2): 123–143.
Published: 01 June 1984
... importance, are those occasions upon which the Son rides out in what Milton calls the “Chariot of Paternal Deity” (6.750), first to end the war in heaven and then to create the new world to be inhabited by man. They offer two striking manifestations of the power of God, in one instance to destroy and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1975) 36 (1): 21–53.
Published: 01 March 1975
... comparison Isaiah 55:8 ff.: “As the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts” (p. 193). The Heraclitean idea of the balance of opposites flowered in the course of centuries into the doctrine ofconcordia discors, which can be...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1962) 23 (4): 291–296.
Published: 01 December 1962
... poem “The Pil- grimage” : “And they Confessed, that they were strangers, and Pilgrims on the earth.” Man is a stranger because his proper home is Heaven, and he is a traveler on the earth in order to return to his home: “SOstrengthen me, Lord, all the way, / That I may travel to thy Mount...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1966) 27 (4): 388–401.
Published: 01 December 1966
... the poem as light comes out of darkness, creation out of chaos, illumination of the poet out of his blindness, even, as Don Cameron Allen has pointed out,* the Heaven of Book III only after the descent to Hell. God has provided the positive values, but for prelapsarian Man the negative...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1952) 13 (2): 131–148.
Published: 01 June 1952
...: the idea of the heavens as consisting of solid crystalline spheres and the more scientific system of epicycles and eccentrics devised by Ptolemy to account for heavenly motions. Of both of them he was highly critical. 1 While I shall make primary reference throughout to the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1966) 27 (2): 185–196.
Published: 01 June 1966
... discussion of the War in Heaven. John Peter would have Satan urge a different and more convincing grievance on his followers in goading them to rebe1lion.l J. B. Broadbent would have the whole of the epi- sode tuned to one or another felicitous line in which Milton showed how the tale could have...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1971) 32 (3): 255–267.
Published: 01 September 1971
... places Heaven on the side of moral meanness, since it too prefers those who die through ways more banal than suicide. More recently, Donald C. Mell, Jr., offered an interpretation quite different from what he calls Gillie’s “highly existential reading.”1° He argues that the design of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1961) 22 (4): 403–405.
Published: 01 December 1961
... one of its ‘solutions’ ever written.” He notes that “the Son’s rhetoric is more flexible,” but suggests that “the derisive laughter of Yahweh will not carry over from Ysaliii ii. into the Heaven of Paradise Lost without debasement of both poems.” Also useful are the discussions of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1953) 14 (4): 341–347.
Published: 01 December 1953
..., and it, too, was carried on in numberless sermons and theological and devo- tional works. What then was the novelty in Paradise Lost? I see it thus. In all the earlier narrative treatments the writers had told the story in chronological order. Milton does not. The War in Heaven is...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1947) 8 (4): 435–447.
Published: 01 December 1947
... unto you, except ye be converted and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven.” Also John 3 :3 : “Jesus answered and said unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, except a man be born again, he cannot see the kingdom of God. Nicodemus saith...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1946) 7 (3): 361–362.
Published: 01 September 1946
... Heaven (see Book 4, lines 205 ff., “A Heav’n on Earth . . That is, Milton is careful to insist throughout the poem that, before the Fall, Earth is some sort of mysterious counterpart or reflection of Heaven, and no part of it more so than Paradise. Was this idea derived in part or in its...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1964) 25 (4): 496–497.
Published: 01 December 1964
... let us march against the powers of heaven, / And set black streamers in the firmament” represent “the essential mind of the play which is also Marlowe’s own mind, glorying in this attitude and giving it moral approval. Battenhouse’s contrary con- clusion is, in Steane’s estimate, “at odds...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1973) 34 (4): 384–405.
Published: 01 December 1973
... versions of the sequence. When King John arrives in France, lie wartis the French to desist from supporting his nephew Arthur, the rival heir to the crown. Otherwise, he storms, let peace ascend to heaven, (a) Whiles we, God’s wrathjul agent, do correct...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1982) 43 (2): 176–179.
Published: 01 June 1982
...; Milton’s paradise in turn reflects the sacred topography of heaven, of which hell is a demonic parody. The hermetic idea of God as a sphere whose center is everywhere, his circumference nowhere, is brought in, and the chapter concludes with some discussion of holy and demonic penetra- tion of a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 2015) 76 (4): 522–524.
Published: 01 December 2015
...—help unify the book. Chapter 3 perceptively explores how Milton’s treatment of Satan both reworks the myths of two characters who fall from the heavens, Icarus and Phaethon, and responds imaginatively and critically to the godless cosmology of Lucretius. Chapter 4 examines tropes of light and vision in...