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guyon

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (1): 1–26.
Published: 01 March 2021
...David Wilson-Okamura Abstract Epics modeled on the Odyssey typically include a version of Homer’s Circe episode. Edmund Spenser’s variant, the Bower of Bliss, is unusual for ending in physical violence so pronounced that many readers have taken against its putative hero, Sir Guyon. This essay...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (2): 160–178.
Published: 01 June 1970
..., Guyon, the.Knight of Temperance, is separated from his guide the Palmer: once in canto i, when Guyon charges the Redcrosse Knight; again in canto vi, when Guyon enters Phaedria’s boat. In the first canto Guyon is inflamed with wrath; he gallops impetuously, heedlessly away from his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (4): 535–541.
Published: 01 December 1942
.... Spenser’s use of Elizabethan psychology in Book I1 of the Faerie Queene has been pointed out by Professors Edward Dow- den, Merritt Hughes, Ernest Strathmann and other Guyon, the 6 The Works of Edmund Spenser. Variorum edition, The Johns Hopkins Press, vol. 11 (1933), appendices IX and X, pp...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (4): 426–445.
Published: 01 December 1967
..., if modern theorizing about the poem is correct, will never emerge. There has to be (unless we redefine “epic”) an epic narrative before there is an imagistic structure. I1 Britomart first appears at the beginning of Book 111, where she unhorses Guyon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (1): 43–52.
Published: 01 March 1946
... The Faerie Queene more closely resemble those cited by Professor Jud- son and Professor Osgood. None is the result of mere whimsicality, and in each case a worthy object is at stake. First and foremost is the notable example of the palmer, who, when he finds Sir Guyon lying in a swoon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 37–42.
Published: 01 March 1947
... of the Fairy Queen, but has sought vainly for her realm. Yet with Guyon he is in Fairy Land all the time. Guyon visits the Celtic Otherworld three times : [to Phaedria’s isle ; to Mannon’s cave ; to Acrasia’s bower]. . . . On the other hand, Britomart says that she has come from her native soil...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (3): 306–309.
Published: 01 September 1977
... observes that the reader is given a vision of Belphoebe which is denied Guyon be- cause, lacking imagination, he cannot see figures who embody “the human yearning for an ideal realm which can be experienced only in imagination” (p. 102). While it is odd, then, that Braggadocchio and Trompart...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (3): 237–255.
Published: 01 September 1979
... in Western literature of a beautiful woman whose personal life is not fo- cused upon love and matrimony. Her masculine counterpart is Guyon, as .Spenser understands in giving Belphoebe her stately first appear- ance in the Book of Temperance. The strategy of Temperance, as re- 4 All...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (3): 475–485.
Published: 01 September 1941
... fashion, to show how this kind of creature will act: he steals Sir Guyon’s horse and spear. And observe the fidelity of The names of several characters in The Faerie Queene passed over into contemporaryQ literary use, as for example Fidessa in Griffin’s Fidessu, more Chaste then Kinde (15...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (3): 465–473.
Published: 01 September 1941
... direct against him. 11.8.43.6. In the fight with Prince Arthur Pyrochles protects himself with Guyon’s shield “Which oft the Paynim sau’d from deadly stowre.” 11.10.19.5. Guendolene pursued and killed Estrild, the mis- tress of her husband, Locrine: “The one she slew...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (2): 141–148.
Published: 01 June 2021
... was a student called “the burden of the past” (Bate 1970 ). But by now, and indeed long since, that book forms part of the burden. And so I welcomed David Wilson-Okamura’s ( 2021 ) defense of Edmund Spenser’s Guyon, a raw youth in The Faerie Queene who prepares a moral future by ransacking the Bower of Bliss...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (1): 135–141.
Published: 01 March 1969
... in the light of the criticisms of Alpers and Robert Durling,2 though my debt to Alpers will owe next to nothing to his theoretical dogmas-i.e., I would change not my way of reading the poem, but my particular view of Guyon as a character. Alpers possesses a rare virtue for which one should be grate...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 97–98.
Published: 01 March 1976
... can offer a roster of names that will equal the list of expert Balzacians: Allem, Bardkche, Le Yaouanc, Bouteron, Pommier, Conner, Guyon, Regard, Dargan, Citron, Pierrot, even old Spoelberch de Lovenjoul himself have made Balzac studies ’ the best of our time. Anthony Pugh already...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2021) 82 (3): 376–378.
Published: 01 September 2021
... supple, pointed prose carries its learning easily: Keats’s advice to Shelley, “Load every rift with ore” (which, she points out in a fine passage, reworks Mammon’s to Guyon), might describe her own language. It’s major work, fascinating in its account of Spenser’s readers and acute in its understanding...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (3): 371–373.
Published: 01 September 1944
... of Book I1 (page 134), “Arthur is simply doubling for Guyon in an adventure which, in turn, duplicates the allegory of the destruction of the Bower of Bliss. The two allegories represent two different ideas for the final battle in the illustration of temperance.” (4) Mrs. Bennett’s acute...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (3): 373–375.
Published: 01 September 1944
... of the Castle of Alma, a proper share in the virtue of temperance. As Mrs. Bennett interprets the development of Book I1 (page 134), “Arthur is simply doubling for Guyon in an adventure which, in turn, duplicates the allegory of the destruction of the Bower of Bliss. The two allegories represent two...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 95–97.
Published: 01 March 1976
... the Baudelairians, the Hugolians, the Flaubertists, or the Zolists can offer a roster of names that will equal the list of expert Balzacians: Allem, Bardkche, Le Yaouanc, Bouteron, Pommier, Conner, Guyon, Regard, Dargan, Citron, Pierrot, even old Spoelberch de Lovenjoul himself have made Balzac studies...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (4): 645–648.
Published: 01 December 1996
...-repressive piety like the “rigour pitilesse” that Guyon feels when he breaks down the Bower of 648 MLQ I December 1996 Blisse (in Watkins’s persuasive analogy [ 1371). But Aeneas cannot appropri- ate Dido’s pain. He is (and we are) unable to turn his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 354–364.
Published: 01 December 1963
... which illustrate, in constrasting ways, this causal relationship. In the final canto of Book 11, Sir Guyon gains a victory over both vices. Arriving at the threshold of the Bower of Bliss, he is met by Excess, who offers him a cup of wine. Guyon dashes the cup to the ground and then proceeds...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (2): 205–208.
Published: 01 June 1943
... himself “emongst loose ladies and lascivious boyes” (F.Q., II.v.29) When Guyon reached the fountain in the Bower of Bliss, he discovered that it was overspread with a trail of ivy whose “lascivious armes adown did creepe” to steep themselves wantonly in the silver dew (F.Q.,II.xii.61...