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guise

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 67–96.
Published: 01 March 2009
... of primitive aesthetics identified drama as the primal art form. The definition of drama, in its newly primitivist guise, expanded to include dance, narration with gesture, and indeed ritual itself. The new attention to ritual coincided with larger shifts in anthropological methodology, captured in the turn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (3): 309–318.
Published: 01 September 1947
... of this subject is the question of the extent to which Marlowe had outside suggestion for the char- acter of Guise. And one does not have to read far into conteniporary discussions of French poiitics to become aware that the playwright has caught up from them almost every single detail of the nature...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (2): 151–173.
Published: 01 June 1947
... interpretation. Thus the characterizations of Navarre, Henry 111, Catherine de Medici, and Guise are those dictated by Protestant favor or hostility. Notably, nearly every one of the resounding villainies of Guise is traceable to the rabid anti-Catholic diatribes currently circulating in France...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (3): 231–247.
Published: 01 September 1980
... as a woman, she can make her observations without breaking the dramatic illusion. At the same time, because she is able to step aside from her male disguise, she has a “certain awareness that she is taking part in a play” (Hyland, p. 29). According to Hyland, the dis- guise is used as a device...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 263–285.
Published: 01 June 1942
... by those hollow men who pass in the world as great.Q Once under way the plot is carried along by the energy and the impetuosity of the hero himself. Restricted to a definite milieu, Bussy follows the unrestrained course of his prototype, baits Guise ar?d the courtiers, overthrows his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (1): 77–81.
Published: 01 March 1945
...., 10148) is a sixteenth-century manu- script which on its first page reproduces the arms of Antoinette de Bourbon (1494-1583) quartered with those of her husband Claude de Lorraige, duke of Guise (1496-1550). Claude was aIso lord of Joinville, having inherited the title along...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (3): 272–280.
Published: 01 September 1950
... to such “other means” in August, 1559, was based primarily on the hope that Antoine de Navarre would stage a “peaceful demonstration” in Paris, assert his right as first prince of the blood, and become the guardian or regent for the young Franqois 11, ejecting the Guises from dominance and giving...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 164–171.
Published: 01 June 1963
... ten more during 1895. He wrote in this guise only twice afterward : “The First of May” (L34, ca. 1905) and “,Fancy’s Knell” (L41, ca. 1900-0s). It is doubtful that Housman would have been so permanently linked with the Shropshire country if he had retained the original title to the 18...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1941) 2 (2): 336–339.
Published: 01 June 1941
... (with slight changes in lines 20 and 21) at the beginning of the Hymne de la Paix. In the note to Artif. 27, Monsieur is identified as “Henry I, duke of Guise”; in the Hymne, 27, he is identified as the duc d’Alenqon, brother of Henri 111. The following lines make it clear that the latter...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1957) 18 (2): 113–124.
Published: 01 June 1957
... is not content with one role but must appear in a variety of guises and disguises.6 Consequently, we find hiin playing not only the part of a clown and bawd, like Pompey, but assuming some- times the characteristics of an irrepressible and impertinent Luc~o,~ sometimes the role of the Duke himself...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 109–110.
Published: 01 March 1943
... is simply made that the first outbreak of polemic came in connection with the anti-Tuscan movement which first appeared in the Cinquecento under the guise of a doctrine favoring the use of a “courtly” type of speech (“lingua corti@and’) instead of one more narrowly Tuscan (p. 14). It may have been...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 367.
Published: 01 December 1956
... of the study of science among English women, beginning with the “fantastic” Duchess of Newcastle, authoress of thirteen books having to do with science (often in the guise of poems or prose romances), and ending with Margaret Bryan, authoress of the Comprndious System of Astron- omy. He explores...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 117–131.
Published: 01 March 2009
... you. (4.4.565 – 68)1  This offer of escape from imperiled banishment to a long-deferred but now-imminent restitution requires the continued assumption of dis- guises: the alternate, exchanged, or otherwise vicarious identities in which a Bohemian prince...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 175–195.
Published: 01 June 1979
... of- fice, who was familiar with the houses in Nighttown? The raucous voice, the obscene limericks delivered with such punctilio . . . Was he playing Rimbaud? Villon?8 The roles into which Joyce slipped in later life were (inadvert- ently) more revealing and, though simpler in guise...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1945) 6 (2): 234–235.
Published: 01 June 1945
...Brents Stirling Don Cameron Allen. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins Press, 1943. Pp. 103. $1.50. Copyright © 1945 by Duke University Press 1945 234 Reviews absolutes into literary history under the guise, paradoxically enough, of offering explanations. A more...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (3): 417–418.
Published: 01 September 1940
... donnoit double plaisir.” Thus we have a documentation of character for all the leading members of the Court; we see the gal- lantry of Guise, the laziness of Villeroy, the industry for the King’s pleasures of Saint-Aignan, the grace of young Mlle. de La Valliitre. His best compliment, after his...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (1): 123–124.
Published: 01 March 1943
... and is therefore constantly at pains to re-create its past in lovable guise. Then, too, he has a remarkable sense of humor, and this turns many a naturally dry incident into a pleasant episode. Volume XI11 is vivid and exciting because of the richness of the period it records and also because...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (2): 206–207.
Published: 01 June 1963
... his adaptation to the differing demands of drama. On the one hand, Marston progresses in comic and satiric technique from the mere bur- lesque of “lovers-indistress” plots to an increasingly refined use of the dis- guised critic-spectator who establishes satiric distance between...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1948) 9 (2): 241–242.
Published: 01 June 1948
... of political dis- cussion in English drama; he admired Dryden’s ability to ratiocinate in heroic verse; in the Henriade he parallels Dryden’s The Duke of Guise in attacking religious bigotry; he borrowed lines from The Medal for Zaire; he based on The Indian Enzperour not only his Alzire...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (4): 366–367.
Published: 01 December 1956
... eighteenth centuries might address herself. He traces the development of the study of science among English women, beginning with the “fantastic” Duchess of Newcastle, authoress of thirteen books having to do with science (often in the guise of poems or prose romances), and ending with Margaret...