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guinevere

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 275–297.
Published: 01 September 1970
... evildoers escape punish- ment and that the most noble characters come to unfortunate ends. RALPH HANNA 111 279 by more somber and revealing events: the Grail quest, the love of Guinevere and L>ancelot,and the final catastrophe. The break between...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1962) 23 (1): 3–16.
Published: 01 March 1962
... to relationship and to place, there is a clear and logical unity among the elements of what we might call the Arthur group: Arthur, his court, Gawain, and Guinevere. The relationship among Morgain, the Green Knight (or Bercilak) , the host’s castle, and the Green Chapel is less obvious; but any...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1973) 34 (4): 372–383.
Published: 01 December 1973
... die CJmwertitng aller Werte, the revaluation of all values” (p. 34). But Adler does not develop these observations, for he is most concerned with what he sees as Guinevere’s plight. Jack- son has written most convincingly of the alienation of ‘I’ristan and Iseult as lovers (there are many...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 333–334.
Published: 01 June 1965
... and the sense of sanctification at the end. Yet his very last sentence is much too literal in referring to the conclusion as “a scene not of triumph but of abject dissolution.” One asks, what of the promise of Arthur’s healing, what of Guinevere’s death, of Lancelot’s in the odor of sanctity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1969) 30 (4): 618–620.
Published: 01 December 1969
... and the Liebestod. Since the sanction for Lancelot’s false philosophy is Arthur’s impossible idealism, Arthur becomes once again-as in other recent and, I think, misguided readings of the Idylls-the well-meaning villain of Camelot, and Guinevere, in whom, we are told, a long-suppressed Keatsian eroticism...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1963) 24 (4): 333–341.
Published: 01 December 1963
... is “wener hen Wenore,” as evidence that she is morally superior to Guinevere. The line merely states that she is prettier. Her conduct in the narrative, if we take it literally rather than as a necessary role in the comedy of testing the hero’s loyalty to his host, is highly immoral...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1955) 16 (3): 218–225.
Published: 01 September 1955
...- scended the superlative ; she was lovelier than the loveliest Guinevere (81-84, 945) and as forthputting as she was beautiful. Three times George J. Engelhardb 22 1 she proffered herself to him. Since it was a discreet household over which she was mistress...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 334–338.
Published: 01 June 1965
... and the sense of sanctification at the end. Yet his very last sentence is much too literal in referring to the conclusion as “a scene not of triumph but of abject dissolution.” One asks, what of the promise of Arthur’s healing, what of Guinevere’s death, of Lancelot’s in the odor of sanctity...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (3): 219–234.
Published: 01 September 1986
... Lancelot’s passion for Guinevere and Mark’s hatred of Tristram, although composed of shallow representations, considerable dimension, if not consider- able depth. In Arthur’s England the actual being of people and events is remote, disjunctive, secondary: they gradually become vivid and impressive...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 181–183.
Published: 01 June 1972
... aptness. Perella expends his main exegetic effort on the Paolo and Francesca epi- sode in Inferno V. Having examined kiss conceits in relation to such fictional pairs of lovers as Guillem and Flamenca, Lancelot and Guinevere, Tristan and Yseut, Pyramus and Thisbe, he turns his attention...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (1): 119–121.
Published: 01 March 1942
... of courtly love. What are we to think, for example, of Professors Cross and Nitze’s excellent study, Lancelot and Guinevere, which is very directly concerned with the problem but makes no mention of the Arabic influence? Are the theories of such a distinguished scholar as Jeanroy to be passed...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (4): 395–397.
Published: 01 December 1981
... influence of the child and Ar- thur’s last rebuke to Guinevere are not merely mawkish or priggish Victorian set-pieces but the enactment of a serious historical and moral vision, such pas- sages are not thereby necessarily redeemed for today’s audience; one’s assent is all too likely to remain...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1972) 33 (2): 183–186.
Published: 01 June 1972
.... Perella expends his main exegetic effort on the Paolo and Francesca epi- sode in Inferno V. Having examined kiss conceits in relation to such fictional pairs of lovers as Guillem and Flamenca, Lancelot and Guinevere, Tristan and Yseut, Pyramus and Thisbe, he turns his attention to the pair from...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (1): 203–227.
Published: 01 March 1965
... tradition. ChrCtien’s Chevalier de la Charrette gives in a coherent form a story about the rape of Guinevere (the Welsh Gwenhwyfur) by a certain Meleagant (the Welsh Melwm) to which sufficient allusions have come down in Welsh poetry to make it clear that this was the subject of a well-known...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (2): 99–121.
Published: 01 June 1960
.... “King Arthur’s Farewell to Guinevere.” N&Q, VI ( 1959), 446-448. (Tennyson’s “Guinevere.” ) 4679. Grinsell, L. V. The Archaeology of HGssex. An account of Wessex antiquities from the earliest times to the end of the pagan Saxon period, with special reference to existing field monuments...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 307–314.
Published: 01 June 1942
..., Phillips D. “John Donne’s ‘Bracelet of bright hair about the bone.’ ” [Exhumation of Guinevere.] MLN, LVI ( 1941), 366-368. 845. Chadwick, H. M. and N. K. The Growth of Literature. New York : The Macmillan Co., 1932. Additional rev. by John Webster Spargo in MLQ, II (1941), 307-312...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1952) 13 (2): 163–179.
Published: 01 June 1952
.... 176 Arthur& Bibliography 3183. Watson, Melvin R. “The Chronology of ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.’ ” 1949. Rev. by Gladys D. Willcock in YWES, xxx, 1949 (1951), 78. 3420. Webster, Kenneth G. T. Guinevere: A Study of her Abduc- tions. Milton, Mass. : The Turtle...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (4): 419–425.
Published: 01 December 1947
..., 49) is one of the ancestors of the Fir Bolg. 19 Cf. Meljahkanz, who carries off the damsel in Wolfram’s Parzival 125, 77) ; Meljaganz, the abductor of Guinevere in Hartmann’s Iwein (5530 f.; $680), and in Pleier’s Garel (ed. Walz, Hartmann, vv. 53-60, 17G41). In Diu Crhe the form...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1953) 14 (2): 163–183.
Published: 01 June 1953
... (3588). 3420. Webster, Kenneth G. T. Guinevere: A Story of her Abduc- tions. 1951. Rev. by A. C. Cawley in MLR, XLVII (1952), 611 ; by James Kinsley in Med. Z., XXI (1952), 48-49 ; by Mary Williams in Fr. St., VI (1952)’ 243-244 ; by Helaine Newstead in JEGP, LII (1953)’ 250-252. 342...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1954) 15 (2): 147–167.
Published: 01 June 1954
... : Metzler, 1953. Brief note by A. Closs in Ger. L. & L., VII (1954), 155. 3420. Webster, Kenneth G. T. Guinevere: A Story of her Abduc- tions. 1951. Rev. by Jean Frappier in RLC, XXVII (1953), 101-103. 3421. and Roger Sherman Loomis. Ulrich von Zat- zikhoven. Lanzelet. 1951...