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gnostic

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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1984) 45 (2): 163–190.
Published: 01 June 1984
...Dwight Eddins Copyright © 1984 by Duke University Press 1984 ORPHIC CONTRA GNOSTIC RELIGIOUS CONFLICT IN GRAVITY’S RAINBOW By DWIGHTEDDINS The most common assumption among the critics of GmuityS Ruin- bow seems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (1): 110–112.
Published: 01 March 1977
... the reprise of “misreadings” of favorite poets that Bloom has been pursuing for years: Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Browning, Yeats, Emerson, Whitman, and (of course) Wallace Stevens. What is added to Bloom’s theory by Poetry and Repression is the theme of gnosticism. Though casually...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (1): 90–91.
Published: 01 March 1961
..., the most Modern, critic. Paulson’s analysis is divided into four parts : “The Parody of Eccentricity,” “The Quixotic Theme,” “The Gnostic View,” and “The Christian View of Man.” He claims for the Tale “an encyclopedic fullness in protean disorder” and an “intensely personal quality...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (1): 91–94.
Published: 01 March 1961
... decade of our century has grown to new life, has had its form closed, opened, and is now in the hands of the very latest, the most Modern, critic. Paulson’s analysis is divided into four parts : “The Parody of Eccentricity,” “The Quixotic Theme,” “The Gnostic View,” and “The Christian...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (2): 243–256.
Published: 01 June 1965
... Cathars. This idea has been the basis of a long controversy; many scholars have supported Rougemont, while conserva- tive majority opinion holds that between the Gnostic, dualistic theology of Catharism and the erotic joie of the troubadours there can be little common ground. Yet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (3): 365–369.
Published: 01 September 1944
... we are told that there were Francis Lee Utley 367 Iscariotists or Judaistae, provided with their Gospel of Judas. How much their alleged veneration of Judas was true Gnostic or Manichaean devil-worship, and how much was an unfriendly fiction...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1942) 3 (2): 171–204.
Published: 01 June 1942
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (3): 303–305.
Published: 01 September 1981
... with Plato or Plotinus or with various Gnostic heretics (and he touches many more than these in this study) does not mean that he is their partner in belief or that he was directly influenced by them, only that he brings a like perspective to the oldest problems of human philosophy. Indeed, what...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1998) 59 (4): 511–514.
Published: 01 December 1998
... adopts a “Gnostic evasion of the body by treating Eve as a spiritual principle. . . . It is something else alto- gether: the woman as pulling man down to the body and death, but assent to this as necessary and right, the goal of eros as lifedeath itself” ( 136). Mil- ton, of course, cannot...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 264–268.
Published: 01 September 1961
...- wise some Christian Theologians follow them concerning the ranks of angels : and the Pseudo-Christian Gnostics, under the names of Aeons and Gods, invented many in this connection. Even the Cabalists in their own World of Angels muster thousands of Angels under the leaders Sandalphon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1975) 36 (1): 21–53.
Published: 01 March 1975
... was set / His mirror, with full face borrowing her light / From him” (7.375-78). In his note to 8.150-51, however, Fowler suggests that Milton “may intend a more covert allu- sion to a Gnostic polarity in which ‘male light’ was mental light and ‘female light’ physical” (p. 823). The lines do...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1993) 54 (1): 67–76.
Published: 01 March 1993
... in the past decades on heresy and reform, sainthood, friendship, poverty, and asceti- cism alongside the monumental reformulations of the meaning and impact of gnosticism and the Stoics. More important, a wave of fresh scholarly activity has revitalized the ways we have traditionally understood...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1967) 28 (3): 317–328.
Published: 01 September 1967
... earliest complete account of the Isis myth is to be found in Plutarch. Yet there is a sense in which “Horus” chafes under this load of gnostic fossil and Enlightenment allegoric, for Nerval does better by the myth than that. His handling of its materials is remarkably sympa- thetic...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1956) 17 (3): 261–272.
Published: 01 September 1956
... year, under the title Blake and Modern Thought. The work also incorporated an article published previously in French in Modern Philology (November, 1925) entitled “Blake et les celto- manes.” Saurat viewed Blake as an eighteenth-century gnostic, but at the same time hailed him as a kindred...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (1): 45–60.
Published: 01 March 1944
... to a visible conversion of the con- secrated elements are ascribed to Gnostic and other heretical teachers, and were thoroughly condemned by the Church Fathers (v. Irenaeus, “Adv. Haer Bk. I, chap. xiii ; Hippolytus, “Refutation of all Heresies chap. xxxiv-xxxv) . Orthodox acceptance...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2008) 69 (4): 461–480.
Published: 01 December 2008
... the productive con- notations of anxiety without ever relinquishing its singular explanatory value in the domains of poetic history and practical criticism; the vast machinery of philosophies of history and identity, of Anglo-American literary tradition, and of Gnostic speculation probes the riddle...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1947) 8 (1): 3–19.
Published: 01 March 1947
... that there existed before his time the gnostic setting of a ritual, unsuccessfully attended by a neophyte, means projecting into the past what could only have developed after him. ChrCtien, on the other hand, with his modern approach to fairy tale, liked the idea of an adventurer who failed.06 In view...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (1): 111–134.
Published: 01 March 1965
... all the complex diversity of practices which Swift opposes, has selected the heresy of Gnosticism. This one basic error which expressed man’s tendency to stress his own sufficiency, and thus through pride to separate himself from other men and his basic responsibilities, Paulson feels, sums...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1946) 7 (4): 385–410.
Published: 01 December 1946
...” ? Other periods of human history whose mentality was radically different from ours certainly believed it, and ancient mythologies recognized in the celestial bodies the visible forms of their gods The Gnostics saw in them the “heavenly hosts in mate- rial form, whose glowing, eruptive vital...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1944) 5 (3): 380.
Published: 01 September 1944