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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2011) 72 (2): 201–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
...Raphaël Ingelbien; Benedicte Seynhaeve This essay explores the intertextual use of Hamlet in Sydney Owenson's Wild Irish Girl and Germaine de Staël's Corinne to shed new light on these writers' interventions in European Romantic politics. Both Owenson and Staël associated their male protagonists...
Image
Published: 01 June 2017
Figure 13. Giuseppe Molteni, An Old Man Showing a Little Girl a Bust of the Duchess Marie Louise , 1830 (Praz 1971 : 223) Figure 13. Giuseppe Molteni, An Old Man Showing a Little Girl a Bust of the Duchess Marie Louise, 1830 (Praz 1971: 223) More
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1998) 59 (3): 394–396.
Published: 01 September 1998
...Marilyn R. Farwell Julie Abraham. New York: Routledge, 1996. xi + 213 pp. $59.95 cloth, $17.95 paper. Copyright © 1998 by Duke University Press 1998 394 MLQ I September 1998 Are Girls Necessary? Lesbian Writing and Modern Histories. By...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 2013) 74 (3): 331–362.
Published: 01 September 2013
... Wife ), ideological argumentation ( The Country Gentleman ), and ambivalent or ironic presentation of conflicted or unstable values ( The Man of Mode ). London can be fun ( The Shoemaker’s Holiday ), glamorous ( The Lady of Pleasure ), wicked ( Friendship in Fashion ), low ( The Roaring Girl ), ugly...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1986) 47 (1): 48–65.
Published: 01 March 1986
... failing career and Mansfield’s growing success, her vehement rejection of Lawrence’s reading of her in The Lost Girl, found outlets in both the extraordinary invective of their letters and the records of their friends, but the real bat- * Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1976) 37 (2): 151–167.
Published: 01 June 1976
..., with the understood predicate “den Tod verstehn.” The addition of a separate predicate for the little girls, especially after the lengthy series of attributes, “die sehr blaf3 aussehn, / Mit grol3en Augen, und die immer frieren,” comes as a distinct surprise. This new predicate, however...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1966) 27 (1): 68–79.
Published: 01 March 1966
... the function of the girls and women in the novel, because Stephen’s messianic dreams are intimately connected with them. Negatively put, then, my hypothesis is: no true messiah is a true misogynist. Or, as the novel has it, -Let us take woman, said Stephen. -Let us take...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1964) 25 (4): 425–433.
Published: 01 December 1964
... Pinkie’s loathing for her. Greene plays upon Rose’s innocence in a manner that suggests Gothic melo- drama. And yet this remarkable girl ensures for the novel a praise beyond the “masterpiece of horror’’ proclaimed on the back cover of the Viking paperback editi0n.l Through her, Greene...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1969) 30 (4): 508–522.
Published: 01 December 1969
... A negro maid woos Cestus, a man of a different color What do I care if my face is black? Dark, 0 Cestus, has this color too, but love Wants it anyway. You are aware that always The forehead of the traveler is scorched. Ah, the girl who...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1948) 9 (3): 298–302.
Published: 01 September 1948
... Experience, “The Voice of the Ancient Bard,” “A Little Girl Lost,” “The Chimney Sweeper,” “A Poison Tree,” and “To Tirzah.” Of these, “A Little Girl Lost which tells of the youthful pair playing on the grass, carries the following motto: Children of a future age...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1954) 15 (4): 343–348.
Published: 01 December 1954
... fiction, there is no appeal.” The novelist is subject to the power of American women, Boyesen revealed, through the agency of “the editors of the paying magazines, behind whom sits, arrayed in stern and bewildering loveliness, his final judge, the young American girl. She is the Iron Madonna...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1963) 24 (3): 263–273.
Published: 01 September 1963
... of “la petite bande” and falls in love with Alber- tine Simonet, the heroine of two subsequent volumes, Proust inserts the Rivebelle interlude-or, more exactly, the Rivebelle digression. The digression, which has no relation to the girls, encompasses not only the evening following that...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1965) 26 (4): 545–557.
Published: 01 December 1965
... this edition. WILLIAM AXTON 547 reader first meets Esther as a child, he finds her quailing before her aunt’s imputation of a stain inherited from her parents’ sin. The girl, her aunt says, has been “orphaned and degraded from the first” by...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 309–311.
Published: 01 September 1943
... inanimated than necessary,” Brown calls them). . . . This is part of what Keats meant. The rest may be suggested by excerpts from his letters: I know not how it is, the Clouds, the Sky, the Houses, all seem anti-Grecian and anti-Charlemagnish. . . . She [a girl in Ireland] is fair, kind...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1972) 33 (4): 396–404.
Published: 01 December 1972
... even as early as 1784-89 Blake recognized such a fall as desirable. There is, for one thing, the evidence of the two poems, “The Little Girl Lost” and “The Little Girl Found” (later transferred to Experience), in which Lyca willingly submits to the descent into experience, a descent largely...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1963) 24 (2): 191–196.
Published: 01 June 1963
... et nous revinmes toutes les deux dans le parloir oi~Mylord Coloquinte, les pieds h l’aise dans ses pantoufles, lisait sa gazette, devant le feu.3 Here the housewifely poses of the girls, engaged in a seemingly trivial task which is reproduced with photographic accuracy, imparts a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1978) 39 (2): 121–131.
Published: 01 June 1978
... that we are expected to accept seriously the notion that a momentary and casual acquaintanceship could forever mar the happiness of an eighteen-year-old girl, which prevents the de- termined antiromanticism of the ending from rescuing the story” (p. 107).8Moreover, Elmore himself strikes...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1957) 18 (3): 251–261.
Published: 01 September 1957
... (New York, 1925), p. 254, report that “Shaw’s criticism was devoted first to art” and that “in painting his hero was Whistler.” ‘1 SmnArts, p. 121. 12 Swinburne in the 1860’s cqmposed a poem for Whistler’s “White Girl, No. 2” which was actually exhibited with the picture as part of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1973) 34 (4): 477–479.
Published: 01 December 1973
... the Macrocosm: CicadaThe Esthetic Perspec- tive: Girl Drowned in the Well”; and “The Psychological Perspective: As Soon As Five Years Pass.” Part 11, called “The Archetypal Symbols of Lorca,” is divided into two chapters: “The Child-symbol: Narcissus” and “The Ocean-symbol: Fable.” If...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1944) 5 (2): 250.
Published: 01 June 1944
... Wooley reveals Storm’s relationship to the young girl and traces her history down to her death in 1903. “Was Theodor Storm Religious?” (Study number IV). The author’s answer cannot satisfy us. Storm was not “kirchlich.” The study proves that convincingly. Storm was ethically a good man. For...