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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1985) 46 (1): 48–63.
Published: 01 March 1985
...Darrel Mansell Copyright © 1985 by Duke University Press 1985 THE GHOST OF LANGUAGE IN THE TURN OF THE SCREW By DAKKELMANSELL 1 A word...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2010) 71 (3): 367–371.
Published: 01 September 2010
...Susanna F. Ferlito Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy .By Joseph Luzzi. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008. x + 294 pp. University of Washington 2010 Reviews Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy. By Joseph Luzzi. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2008. x + 294...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2016) 77 (2): 193–217.
Published: 01 June 2016
...Samuel Fallon Abstract After the popular Elizabethan writer Robert Greene died in 1592, a series of pamphlets appeared with stories of his ghost’s haunting returns. These pamphlets—Henry Chettle’s Kind-Harts Dreame (1592), Barnabe Riche’s Greenes Newes both from Heauen and Hell (1593), and John...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (2): 270–276.
Published: 01 June 1999
... it an extraordinarily valuable resource for students of twentieth-century Ameri- can poetry. Ursula K. Heise, Columbia University The Ghosts of Modernity. By Jean-Michel Rabatk. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996. xxii t 258 pp. $49.95. Modernity, Jean-Michel...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 163–200.
Published: 01 June 2011
... son of the murdered king is limited in his freedom to maneuver and whose quest for freedom is both fueled and stymied by the Ghost's command that he kill his uncle. Hamlet dramatizes the felt connections between external constraints on freedom of action and internal states that inhibit or foster...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1976) 37 (1): 15–34.
Published: 01 March 1976
... and violent protagonist on the stage, spends the vast bulk of his play trying in vain to avoid be- coming the revenge hero demanded of him by his father’s ghost and, concomitantly, to avoid participating in such a scene as the final blood- bath. H. D. F. Kitto has convincingly demonstrated...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1970) 31 (3): 275–297.
Published: 01 September 1970
... the Arthurians appear especially de- fenseless and nai’ve. The failure of the knights to recognize the other- ness of nature limits the range of chivalric experience quite sharply in a manner that is vaguely comic; with the appearance of the ghost and the responses which she elicits, the implications...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1940) 1 (2): 245–248.
Published: 01 June 1940
... this doctrine and liter- ature. Mr. West’s aim is to scrutinize the ghosts in the plays of Shakespeare’s contemporaries-ghosts and related daemonic figures with their dependent human pursuits, ceremonial magic and witch- craft-and to elucidate these spirit findings by specific .references...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2001) 62 (4): 355–376.
Published: 01 December 2001
... set pieces (“handfuls . . . of tragical speeches5 Another reference, from 1596, indicates that the play was already so familiar that the ghost’s injunction—“Hamlet, revengeregistered as a byword. These responses to the Ur-Hamlet might just as well have greeted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 163–170.
Published: 01 March 2009
..., although in a very different way from the ghost of old Hamlet. Derrida was of course mainly occu- pied with the specters and their demands, not with Fortinbras, who belongs to the world of politics and whose wars and conquests, even if they serve merely as the backdrop to the tragedy of Hamlet...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1943) 4 (4): 473–494.
Published: 01 December 1943
... of Apparitions (London, 1813), must be purchased at the price of the “Pleasures of Superstition,” much of the sublime in poetry, and “the thrilling delight of a ghost-story by a Christmas fire-side.” It was to just such a fireside that Walter Scott was invited on November 26, 1805, by Pandemonia...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1997) 58 (2): 201–225.
Published: 01 June 1997
... contradiction.1 Through a ritual inheritance of Marx’s legacy Specters stakes out an identification with Marxism whose peculiarity lies not primarily in the rhetoric of conjur- ing or being “inspired by” Marx’s ghost but in the fact that Derrida’s claim to this ghostly heritage seems to entail...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1999) 60 (2): 267–270.
Published: 01 June 1999
... investigation makes it an extraordinarily valuable resource for students of twentieth-century Ameri- can poetry. Ursula K. Heise, Columbia University The Ghosts of Modernity. By Jean-Michel Rabatk. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 1996. xxii t 258 pp...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1996) 57 (3): 510–512.
Published: 01 September 1996
... and the thermometer as indexes of literal rather than metaphoric weather. Equally fascinating: a twentiethcentury ghost story, the obsessively supported tale of two Englishwomen encountering Marie Antoinette on a visit to Versailles. Castle offers unpredictable interpreta- tions: a reading of The Femab...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1979) 40 (2): 135–154.
Published: 01 June 1979
... HAMLET every scene except for Hamlet’s soliloquies, the main dramatic effect is provided by someone watching, listening to, or spying upon someone else. It opens with Barnardo and Francisco watching for the Ghost. We then shift to Gertrude and Claudius in council, watched by the ostenta...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1978) 39 (4): 331–362.
Published: 01 December 1978
...,” or by that of the scholarly Horatio, he who addresses the Ghost and is to de- liver Hamlet’s story to the surviving audience, as “orator”4f we elide the initial letter and transpose Italian into Latin. However, Shakespeare seems less concerned with the nationality of his Characters’ names than...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1986) 47 (3): 291–315.
Published: 01 September 1986
.... He sees in the dramatic exchange between ghostly father and living son Shakespeare’s investment of personal energy in the idea of transcendental separation. But, following the traditional belief (first recorded a century after the fact) that Shakespeare played the part of the ghost, he...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (2): 115–136.
Published: 01 June 1981
... im- personality. Hamlet does not refer to his encounter with the Ghost of his father, or to the Ghost’s accusations against Claudius and Gertrude, or to the plan to catch the conscience of the King that Hamlet so exu- berantly revealed in his preceding soliloquy. Each entry in Hamlet’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1950) 11 (1): 50–57.
Published: 01 March 1950
..., to which the belief and power of his own life could be united This refuge, the “ghost of memory” leads one to believe, was a part of prenatal ex- istence;4 but rather than a heavenly home, as in Wordsworth’s Ode: Intimutions of Immortdity, this prenatal life appears to be the endless...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 201–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
...) (224; 336). Lord Nelvil’s conscience, though, is synony- mous with his father’s will, which weighs as heavily on his mind as the Ghost’s terrible revelation and command, in Wilhelm Meister’s read- ing, weighs on the delicate soul of the Prince of Denmark. Faced with the necessity of giving up...