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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1981) 42 (2): 137–152.
Published: 01 June 1981
...Michael G. Ketcham Copyright © 1981 by Duke University Press 1981 THE ARTS OF GESTURE THE SPECTATOR AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PHYSIOGNOMY, PAINTING, AND THE THEATER By MICHAELG. KETCHAM In Spectator No. 4, Richard Steele...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1965) 26 (3): 448–461.
Published: 01 September 1965
...James H. Justus Copyright © 1965 by Duke University Press 1965 THE USES OF GESTURE IN WARREN’S THE CAVE By JAMES H. JUSTUS In his essay on Nostromo, Robert Penn Warren observes that Conrad was more interested in the kind of experienced...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 362–377.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Tim Armstrong Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 FINAL GESTURES B’ B’ TIMARMSTRONG As he was lying on his deathbed, Thomas Hardy dictated two angry squibs about his enemies George Moore and G. K. Chester- ton. The poems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1988) 49 (4): 362–377.
Published: 01 December 1988
...Tim Armstrong Copyright © 1988 by Duke University Press 1988 FINAL GESTURES B’ B’ TIMARMSTRONG As he was lying on his deathbed, Thomas Hardy dictated two angry squibs about his enemies George Moore and G. K. Chester- ton. The poems...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (4): 461–492.
Published: 01 December 2011
... to abandon. Yet in the context of the seventeenth century, such gestures were associated with modernity rather than the opposite. This essay reinterprets the significance of authorial modesty by analyzing this disconnect, which calls attention less to the changing strategies of writers than to the evolving...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2012) 73 (1): 13–35.
Published: 01 March 2012
... on John Milton’s repeated gestures of lyric disparagement as well as his iconography of the anthropomorphized book. Both of these rhetorical features seem to constellate around the genre of the lyric during the early modern period. Sharon Achinstein is professor of Renaissance literature at Oxford...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (1): 67–96.
Published: 01 March 2009
... of primitive aesthetics identified drama as the primal art form. The definition of drama, in its newly primitivist guise, expanded to include dance, narration with gesture, and indeed ritual itself. The new attention to ritual coincided with larger shifts in anthropological methodology, captured in the turn...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2011) 72 (2): 201–223.
Published: 01 June 2011
... with the influence of empowered Ophelias who illustrate a less solipsistic version of melancholy. Thus both authors criticize the inertia that gripped their male counterparts directly after the French Revolution. Staël's novel ultimately follows a tragic pattern, while Owenson's gestures toward the possibility...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 281–282.
Published: 01 September 1960
... (Leipzig, 1890), but the two works have, in fact, rather little in common. Sittl’s standard work is an ex- haustive account of gestures in classical antiquity. It deals with bodily motions intended to convey a meaning to another person and describes them historically and critically...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1961) 22 (3): 302–306.
Published: 01 September 1961
... to the human body and to the human voice. Such rhythms in the dialogue are possible because eventually the words spoken by the actor will be related to his gestures and movements and, by extension, to the visual arts such as ballet or even to rhythmic exercises such as gymnastics. The words themselves...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2015) 76 (4): 525–529.
Published: 01 December 2015
.... In a repeated rhetorical gesture of specification and indeterminacy or withdrawal at once, it is only in “certain moments of certain texts” that we encounter the radical aesthetic (1, 5). Pyle offers this prose “refrain” as a reminder that “a radical aestheticism is not a constitutive feature of textuality...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1977) 38 (4): 323–335.
Published: 01 December 1977
... gestures. Through those gestures, the hero shows an awareness of his fate and defies it by freely choosing the posture he wishes to strike at the moment of his de- struction. In Shakespeare, such final gestures nearly always reaffirm the initial image of the hero. But when I say that the hero’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1960) 21 (3): 280–281.
Published: 01 September 1960
... learned treatise, Die Gebarden der Griechen und Romer (Leipzig, 1890), but the two works have, in fact, rather little in common. Sittl’s standard work is an ex- haustive account of gestures in classical antiquity. It deals with bodily motions intended to convey a meaning to another person...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 527–531.
Published: 01 December 2009
... by its enemies and oldest friends” (91). Adams divides poetry’s offense into four principal categories: gesture, drama, fiction, and trope. The aim of this taxonomy, he notes, is “not to offer these offenses as something startlingly new but to remind of their con- tinued important presence...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 532–534.
Published: 01 December 2009
... divides poetry’s offense into four principal categories: gesture, drama, fiction, and trope. The aim of this taxonomy, he notes, is “not to offer these offenses as something startlingly new but to remind of their con- tinued important presence, given the relatively recent theoretical empha- sis...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 535–538.
Published: 01 December 2009
... — should exist in productive tension rather than in Hegelian synthesis. “Poetry must stand in opposition for friendship’s sake, but in a third, ‘antithetical’ posi- tion not defined by its enemies and oldest friends” (91). Adams divides poetry’s offense into four principal categories: gesture...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 538–542.
Published: 01 December 2009
... in opposition for friendship’s sake, but in a third, ‘antithetical’ posi- tion not defined by its enemies and oldest friends” (91). Adams divides poetry’s offense into four principal categories: gesture, drama, fiction, and trope. The aim of this taxonomy, he notes, is “not to offer these offenses...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (2009) 70 (4): 542–545.
Published: 01 December 2009
... — should exist in productive tension rather than in Hegelian synthesis. “Poetry must stand in opposition for friendship’s sake, but in a third, ‘antithetical’ posi- tion not defined by its enemies and oldest friends” (91). Adams divides poetry’s offense into four principal categories: gesture...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1949) 10 (4): 438–443.
Published: 01 December 1949
... gestures.‘ The sociktaires seemed no longer capable of pro- ducing a single actor or actress to compete with Frederick Lemaitre or Marie Dorval, and the public, after Hernani, followed the tri- umphant Romantic drama to other houses. By 1833, the deficit of France’s first theater amounted...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1980) 41 (4): 346–362.
Published: 01 December 1980
... observations on Berkeley: I suspect he knew very well that he was not refuting Berkeley thus; but if Berkeley could deprive this act of its substance, he could not deprive it of its moral energy, and what counted for Johnson was that energy. His triumphs as a moralist consist of gestures which...