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Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1999) 60 (1): 59–83.
Published: 01 March 1999
...Michael Thurston Copyright © 1999 by Duke University Press 1999 Documentary Modernism as Popular Front Poetics: Muriel Rukeyser’s “Book of the Dead” Michael Thurston In the standard history of modern American poetry, 1929 does not stand out. Ernest Hemingway published A...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1996) 57 (1): 115–117.
Published: 01 March 1996
... of his legacy, as a final comparison with Hegel shows. Tim Fulford, Nottingham Trent University Letters from the Front. Vol. 3 of No Man ’s Land: The Place of the Woman Writer in the Twentieth Century. By Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar. New Haven, Conn.: Yale...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1999) 60 (1): 119–122.
Published: 01 March 1999
... trying to pinpoint one intellectual arena as the single (or even the principal) source of manifestly different develop- ments with varied effects in every arena of thought and experience. Timothy J. Reiss, New York University Home Fronts: Domesticity and Its...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2019) 80 (2): 195–219.
Published: 01 June 2019
... the pressure of anticommunism. The 1940s work of Muriel Rukeyser, turning away from an earlier documentary poetics, exemplifies her generation’s concern with the continuity between the Popular Front and World War II rather than a retreat from New Deal reform to patriotic consensus. During this...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1940) 1 (1): 3–6.
Published: 01 March 1940
... one) of sound change. This is above all the case when, in the pro- duction of a particular vowel or diphthong, two organs are concerned, and one is active at the front of the mouth while the other is active at the back of it. Concentration results here in the process of fronting...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1950) 11 (1): 7–16.
Published: 01 March 1950
... perspective scenery and its front curtain, was born at the turning point of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries in Italy; thence it slowly spread first to the French and English and, later, to the German courts. Much pictorial material relating to such courtly entertainments, mainly masques...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1947) 8 (3): 267–289.
Published: 01 September 1947
... the general phonetic description of their principal allophones :? VOWELS: front (unrounded) central (unrounded) back (rounded) high 1: 1 u: u mid e: e 0: 0 low a a...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1941) 2 (4): 656–657.
Published: 01 December 1941
...Carl F. Bayerschmidt A. E. Zucker. Translated from the Low German of the Fifteenth Century with Introduction and Notes. Records of Civilization Sources and Studies, No. XXXII. New York: Columbia University Press, 1941. Pp. x + 134, front. $2.00. Copyright © 1941 by Duke University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1945) 6 (3): 327–328.
Published: 01 September 1945
... Walter Scott, 12 vols. (London, 1932-1937), 11, 410. 2 VIII, 181-93. 3 “8vo. pp. 279. Edinburgh ; Ballantyne.” 4 See note 3, above. 327 328 An Unidentified Review Laura, p. 12,”5by which he presumably means the illustration front- ing...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1952) 13 (3): 313.
Published: 01 September 1952
... in point of time represent beginnings. Each partook of short-lived but vigorous movements destined to leave a stamp on literature through sheer violence before dissipating when con- fronted by more settled minds. From a stylistic point of view both Storm and Stress and...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1951) 12 (1): 93–95.
Published: 01 March 1951
... Vingt gCants soucieux qui portaient A leur front Un mil, comme la lune, immobile et tout rond. . . . A la vue de l’enfant, les Cyclopes interrompirent leur travail et Vulcain parut : I1 prit l’enfant divin . . . Et frkmit, au dedans, d‘une douleur am6re...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1953) 14 (2): 184–198.
Published: 01 June 1953
.... 269), does not appear in KG. (The plural is Jo:fa.) IV. KG [el, a short mid-front vowel, slightly lowered before MHG r, from: ( 1) MHG e in closed syllables : fenJda “window”, etc. (2) MHG e in open syllables: Jwefalholts “match”, ewa “boar”, fedadeg “feather-bed”, aisahefa “iron...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1977) 38 (4): 411–413.
Published: 01 December 1977
...). I. A. Richards, R. Jakobson, M. A. K. Halliday, J. R. Firth, J.-P. Sartre, F. de Saussure, and J. Dixon’s Growth Through Eng- lish are all wheeled into front-line positions before the attack begins. More books on language and linguistics are listed in the “Theoretical” section of the...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1948) 9 (3): 363–365.
Published: 01 September 1948
... not mentioned purposely, yet whether or not Defoe was his tool modifies or confirm’s Defoe’s clamorous assertions of independence and our reliance upon his word. (Today we go beyond the news front to get behind the news.) It has been said that to understand Defoe it is often necessary to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1941) 2 (2): 345–347.
Published: 01 June 1941
... used connote very definite ideas. On p. 8, the author enters upon a discussion of the Latin sound of c before a front vowel, and asserts that its sound was k. That may give rise to unprofitable controversy, and some will probably always remain doubtful of any conclusion. Would it not...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1976) 37 (3): 211–220.
Published: 01 September 1976
... orchestra pit at the Savoy and lit it by spotlights attached to the front rail of the dress’circle, an expe- dient imitated in the majority of old proscenium theaters afterwards.1° But this new lighting and its suggestion of an apron stage were met at first with general disapproval: The...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1977) 38 (4): 413–414.
Published: 01 December 1977
... Shakespeare’s plays are sometimes performed, and indeed were designed for the stage, and therefore that sometimes what happens in front of the viewer’s eye is as significant as the words (which in any event don’t mean very much). Tiresome as these formulas are, they could have led in the hands of...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1978) 39 (4): 421–422.
Published: 01 December 1978
..., it thereby serves to organize his work. ‘The drama which Frederick Garber sees as central is Thoreau’s prob- lematic relation to nature. He sees Thoreau as always fronting nature; hence, the line (or frontier or border) on which Thoreau takes his stand is that indeterminate boundary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1949) 10 (1): 105–106.
Published: 01 March 1949
... classes and observed them closely in their daily life. As a result of this observation his confidence in them was reassured. Everywhere he saw evidence that, despite the anguish of war and the Occupation, the French people have still the will to con- front hardships with cheerful courage. No...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1949) 10 (1): 106–107.
Published: 01 March 1949
... Occupation, the French people have still the will to con- front hardships with cheerful courage. No escapists were those earnest “little people” whom he saw each day bravely meeting problems of dis- heartening difficulty. Mr. Falls is persuaded that the future of such a people is assured, and he...