1-20 of 464 Search Results for

freud

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
×Close Modal
Sort by
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1991) 52 (3): 355–358.
Published: 01 September 1991
.... Newsome, whose “Cartesian method,” as Posnock calls it (p. 225), “doesn’t admit surprises.” MILLICENTBELL Boston University Sexual Dissidence: Augustine to Wilde, Freud to Foucault. By JONATHAN DOLLIMORE. Oxford: Clarendon, 1991. x...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1996) 57 (3): 449–477.
Published: 01 September 1996
...: Masculine Thresholds in Schubert, James, and Freud Lawrence Kramer evenant: a specter, a ghost, a phantom, one who haunts, who R returns, who walks again. From the French rmenir: to come again, return, reappear, haunt, rebegin, recover, regain consciousness, but also to fetch as...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1978) 39 (4): 363–385.
Published: 01 December 1978
...DAVID EGGENSCHWILER Copyright © 1978 by Duke University Press 1978 “DIE VERWANDLUNG,” FREUD, AND THE CHAINS OF ODYSSEUS By DAVIDEGGENSCHWILER For nearly half a century, since Hellmuth Kaiser’s 1931 essay in Ima...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2013) 74 (2): 261–276.
Published: 01 June 2013
...Peter Höyng In Beethoven’s last symphony one encounters a prototype in which music serves as a powerful catalyst for literature. It is his music that transported Schiller’s poem “An die Freude” (“Ode to Joy”) beyond its temporal, linguistic, and geographic origin. If one dubs this phenomenon “world...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 1958) 19 (1): 53–59.
Published: 01 March 1958
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2014) 75 (1): 77–101.
Published: 01 March 2014
... divergences between Proust’s and Freud’s understandings of consciousness and to measure them against the rival philosophical and psychological theories developed during the twentieth century. The current pluralism in the humanities’ approach to analyzing representations of the mind allows the literary...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1996) 57 (3): 508–509.
Published: 01 September 1996
... reflection and conceptual genealogy. Lukacher pairs Freud and Heidegger as the two most important heirs of Shakespeare’s staging of con- science, which is itself situated between the JudeclChristian tradition of con- science as an internalized moral law and the Greek (pagan and pre- Socratic) “daemon...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1976) 37 (2): 198–202.
Published: 01 June 1976
... forms” (p. 27). No specific authors are cited. The only figure who represents our age, aside from the impersonal forces of progressive industrialization, is Freud. Kroeber argues that Con- stable and Wordsworth are impermeably closed to a Freudian approach. Freud has little interest in...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1943) 4 (3): 343–357.
Published: 01 September 1943
... particular, it is clear that his interest in dreams, amateurish though it may be, is due to the contemporary emphasis. Inevitably the mention of dreams brings into the discussion the name of Sigmund Freud. We are now accustomed to statements like that of Dandieu : “Nourri de Bergson et-pourquoi...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1999) 60 (2): 291–293.
Published: 01 June 1999
..., specifically, Cervantes’ hand. The reader ponders that “truncated hand” after a salubrious run through Freud, Descartes, and virtually all the major critical discourses of European modernity and post- modernity. Cervantes’ maimed hand gives way to Don Quixote’s eroticized hand and, at the book’s...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 1991) 52 (2): 217–221.
Published: 01 June 1991
... that good Marxist Raymond Williams consis- tently marginalizes and abstracts the female. Miller admires Williams. She maintains a good-humored tone in analyzing his thought (and that of Lacan, Freud, Bakhtin), yet her relentless demonstration of how women disappear from or are generalized by...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2017) 78 (2): 275–277.
Published: 01 June 2017
... conflicts prepared in his name. Over and beyond the two chapters devoted to Freud at the beginning and the end, Silke-Maria Weineck’s repeated returns to the Oedipus complex indicate her indebtedness to twentieth-century psychoanalysis. But through her analyses of Freud and Sophocles, along with Plato...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1991) 52 (4): 357–375.
Published: 01 December 1991
... anxiety and obsession are reflected in discourse, both literary and nonliterary. Moreover, they seem to be as prevalent today as they were four hundred years ago. The passages that I read from Freud’s Moses and Monotheism, Bakhtin’s Rabelaas and His Wwld, and Rabelais’s work illustrate my point...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2003) 64 (1): 1–32.
Published: 01 March 2003
... repertoire of inquiry into human relations.—Hortense J. Spillers, “‘All the Things You Could Be by Now, If Sigmund Freud’s Wife Was Your Mother’: Psychoanalysis and Race” early a century ago—back in the old millennium—W. E. B. DuBois Noffered a description of American social life...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2014) 75 (1): 57–75.
Published: 01 March 2014
...: American Literature across Deep Time . Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press . Freud Sigmund . 1985 . The Complete Letters of Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess , edited and translated by Masson Jeffrey Moussaieff . Cambridge, MA : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 March 2004) 65 (1): 69–92.
Published: 01 March 2004
... in what Freud calls “the fundamental rule,” psychoanalysis’s most necessary component: no self-censorship. The revolutionary hope for radical equality creates a space for uttering inaudible desires and stimulates the belief that they will be, eventually, articulable. It is only the capacity to...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1989) 50 (3): 227–247.
Published: 01 September 1989
... language and the images it invokes-that call our attention to an internal discontinuity within the text, to the presence within it of something other than the story of an easy or charming journey. As Freud suggests, we are not necessarily the authors of our own texts: just as dreams, like ancient...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 December 1997) 58 (4): 497–508.
Published: 01 December 1997
... his place among the group of twenti- eth-century thinkers that includes Freud, Heidegger, Sartre, Beauvoir, Merleau-Ponty, J. L. Austin, and Wittgenstein.’ These thinkers share, among other things, a painstaking attentiveness to the particular case, a wish to take the concrete...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 June 2016) 77 (2): 268–271.
Published: 01 June 2016
... are consistently spoken of as if they were real people, as open to physio-psychological analysis as real people are. One example is the analogy Staten draws between Nachträglichkeit in Sigmund Freud’s patient Emma and Dorothea’s delay in understanding what has been erotic all along in her feelings...
Journal Article
Modern Language Quarterly (1 September 1991) 52 (3): 352–355.
Published: 01 September 1991
... Yeazell’s pen- etrating eye. True, Freud’s discussion is about male neurosis, not female behavior, but this essay (like so much of Freud, an unsurpassed if unwitting history of bourgeois values) stunningly reveals where two centuries of modest fictions led for many. What may have started as a...